Exhibit Celebrates Leonard Bernstein at 100

Bernstein Centennial Celebration
Performer. Composer. Teacher.
These three descriptions of world-renowned musician Leonard Bernstein, who was born 100 years ago this year, are celebrated in a new exhibit on display on the 4th floor lobby of the Walter C. Langsam Library now through the end of the calendar year. The exhibit includes biographical and professional information about Bernstein, recordings, books and images. It corresponds with a display in the Albino Gorno Memorial (CCM) Library of additional Bernstein materials and recordings.

ccm displayThe exhibit was designed by UC Libraries communication co-op student Sophia Yu with assistance from co-op student Sam Kane. It was curated by Jenny Doctor, head of the CCM Library, and Paul Cauthen, assistant music librarian, and produced by Melissa Cox Norris, director of library communications.

For more about Leonard Bernstein, read the full exhibit text below by Jenny Doctor. Interested in attending a Leonard Bernstein Concert, visit https://ccm.uc.edu/boxoffice/bernstein-festival.html, to learn about how CCM is celebrating Leonard Bernstein at 100! Continue reading Exhibit Celebrates Leonard Bernstein at 100

How UC Researchers use the Open Science Framework – UC Center for Police Research and Policy

In our second installment of the series “How UC Researchers use the Open Science Framework”, we hear from Hannah McManus, Gabrielle Isaza, and Clair Green-Schwartz, Research Associates with the IACP / UC Center for Police Research and Policy 

Hannah McManus, Gabrielle Isaza, and Clair Green-Schwartz, Research Associates with the IACP / UC Center for Police Research and Policy

Research Project Description or statement about your research interest

The International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP)/University of Cincinnati (UC) Center for Police Research and Policy engages in rigorous research that has practical implications for the field and is intended to serve as a national model for the way law enforcement agencies and researchers work together to help protect communities, safeguard citizens’ rights, and ensure the fair treatment of all individuals.

There is currently a gap between research and practice, and the IACP/UC Center for Police Research and Policy seeks to play an important role in closing that gap. Often times existing research does not provide actionable recommendations that can be easily translated into specific, practical policies and practices that could enhance policing. Moreover, academic researchers often do not have access to all the data that police departments have that is necessary to conduct rigorous and meaningful research on police practices. The goal of the IACP/UC Center for Police Research and Policy is to provide a path for law enforcement and researchers to work together on studies that can drive future practices and policies.

Why did you chose to use the OSF to organize your research/projects?

The IACP/UC Center for Police Research and Policy is funded by the Laura and John Arnold Foundation (LJAF). The LJAF is committed to funding research that meets the most rigorous standards of quality and transparency. As such, we make public our preregistration document for each project, which involves describing the research design in detail before the statistical analyses are performed. Further, we update the Center’s OSF profile as we gather more information on individual projects, and submit all applicable research materials onto the OSF for public viewing. At the end of our research projects, we include the findings either in the form of a written report or a link to a publication or preprint elsewhere. These findings must be freely available in some form, which removes the financial barriers that some may face when trying to access research. The Center’s OSF webpage thus provides a comprehensive overview of an entire research project from start to finish. And further, in the event that a research project does not lead to a peer-reviewed publication, posting the results at OSF serves a valuable informative purpose.

What about the OSF makes this tool a good choice for your project management (i.e. specific function of the OSF)?

The OSF is a useful web platform to centralize all parts of the project from initial idea to final results. It keeps a useful history of documents for us to track changes and progress over time. Ultimately, this tool is most useful in its ability to serve as a platform for transparency in research.

Please use this link for further detail about the Center for Police Research and Policy’s research projects:

https://osf.io/f2drv/

Rebecca Olson Joins UC Libraries as Business and Social Sciences Informationist

Today, Rebecca Olson joined UC Libraries as business and social sciences informationist. Rebecca has many years of experience as a law librarian. She was certified in 2018 in School Media from Southern Connecticut State University.  Prior to beginning her career in libraries, Rebecca received her MLS from Indiana University and her BA from the University of Connecticut.

Rebecca’s main responsibilities will be to develop and deliver innovative research and instructional services to the UC communities in business and the social sciences. She will work collaboratively with business and social science faculty and with UC Libraries faculty and staff to design, develop and implement a suite of cohesive services for faculty and students in business and the social sciences for data access, management and preservation.

Welcome to UC Libraries, Rebecca!

 

 

Dean’s Corner: End of Summer 2018

As you know, I spent the last week of August in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia for the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) World Library and Information Congress (WLIC). When I returned, I met with my senior leadership for a day long retreat at Hueston Woods near Oxford, Ohio. I gave updates on my planning thoughts for UC Libraries’ newest strategic endeavors, we reflected on the new opportunities and challenges we may face in the upcoming year and talked about further alignment with UC’s Next Lives Here directions. We also spent time bringing the two new members of my senior leadership team, Associate Dean for Library Services Brad Warren and Associate Director of Business Affairs Jeremy Berberich, up to speed. We ended the day with dinner with a special guest, Jerome Conley, the Dean of the Miami University Libraries.

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Tell Us About Your Research Practices and Needs

In order for the University of Cincinnati Libraries to provide the best possible research and data support services, we would like to encourage all faculty, staff and students to participate in a brief survey regarding your research practices and needs.

Taking part in this survey is completely voluntary, but your participation will help us to continue and create more meaningful services centered around your research and data needs. If you agree to participate, please complete the survey via the URL provided to give us more information about your primary research area, the type of data used for your research, and the assistance sought to deal with your data. We appreciate your time and look forward to serving you.

https://redcap.research.cchmc.org/surveys/?s=NAAAF33RH4

Workshops on Research Reproducibility

Research Reproducibility Workshops

workshops facilitator April Clyburne-Sherin
workshops facilitator April Clyburne-Sherin

UC Libraries and IT@UC are pleased to offer two workshops on Research Reproducibility as part of the Data and Computational Science Series.  We are partnering with Code Ocean to offer these workshop on Oct 3rd and 4th.  The workshops facilitator is April Clyburne-Sherin from Code Ocean.  April is an epidemiologist, methodologist and expert in open science tools, methods, training and community stewardship. She holds an MS in Population Medicine (Epidemiology). Since 2014, she has focused on creating curriculum and running workshops for scientists in open and reproducible research methods and is co-author of FOSTER’s Open Science Training Handbook. She is currently the Director of Scientific Outreach for the reproducibility platform Code Ocean.  Code Ocean (https://codeocean.com/) is a cloud-based computational reproducibility platform that provides researchers and developers an easy way to share, discover and run code published in academic journals and conferences.  Their mission is to make the world’s scientific code more reusable, executable and reproducible.  More information and registration for the workshops can be found at the links below.  Questions?  Email AskData@UC.Edu.  The events are free and open to all.

Workshop 1 — East Campus, Biomedical and Clinical Focus

URL – https://webapps2.uc.edu/ce/FacDev/Workshops/Details/11432

Title: Integrating reproducible best practices into biomedical and clinical research: A hands-on workshop for researchers – Data And Computational Science Series

Date: Wednesday, Oct. 3, 1 – 3pm

Location: Troup Learning Space Conf Rm-MSB G005G

Workshop 2 — West Campus, General Audience

URL – https://webapps2.uc.edu/ce/FacDev/Workshops/Details/11433

Title: Preparing your data and code for reproducible publication: A hands-on workshop for researchers – Data And Computational Science Series

Date: Thursday, Oct. 4, 10am – 12pm

Location: CEAS Library Classroom 850D Baldwin

DCS2 CodeOcean_flyerV2

 

Hannah Stitzlein Joins UC Libraries as Metadata Librarian

Today, Hannah Stitzlein began work at the University of Cincinnati Libraries as the metadata librarian. Hannah was previously visiting metadata services specialist for the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. In this role, she developed best practices for the Illinois Digital Heritage Hub, taught metadata workshops, assessed digital collection metadata and developed workflows. Prior to her visiting position, Hannah spent three years with the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County. Her library experience also includes internships with Wisconsin Library Services, the Lloyd Library and Museum and the Henry R. Winkler Center for the History of the Health Professions. Hannah holds an MLS from the University of Wisconsin, Madison and a BFA from Pacific Northwest College of Art.

In the role of metadata librarian, Hannah will be responsible for providing leadership and guidance in the development and implementation of metadata and data management strategies to support discovery, access, management and preservation of the libraries physical and digital collections.

Welcome back to Cincinnati and to UC, Hannah!

How UC Researchers use the Open Science Framework – Emily Kean

As the first installment of the series “How UC Researchers use the Open Science Framework”, we hear from Emily Kean, Research and Education Librarian and Liaison for Nursing who is based at the Health Sciences Library.

Research Project Description or statement about your research interest I’m incorporated on several research teams from UC Health and the College of Nursing that are conducting systematic or integrative reviews. I’m responsible for generating reproducible search strings that will eventually be published as part of the review manuscripts.

Why did you chose to use the OSF to organize your research/projects? I needed an organization tool that allowed me to track my progress over time and also share my work privately with the entire research team. I used one or two other options before settling on the Open Science Framework. OSF seems to work best for my needs. Adding collaborators is very easy and the design is so intuitive, there isn’t much of a learning curve for training new team members.

What about the OSF makes this tool a good choice for your project management (i.e. specific function of the OSF)? I love the wiki and the fact that multiple people can edit and view the same content simultaneously. Most of my process is documenting term harvesting and testing and the wiki has been the perfect way to organize my work. My research partners can see my progress in real time, and at the end, I have reproducible search strings.

Additional information about the project or using the OSF that you are willing to share: None of my projects are currently public, but one of the features of the OSF that I’m looking forward to using is sharing my sites publicly after our manuscripts are published. Typically, only one search string for a systematic review would be printed, and the OSF will allow me to share all of the progress and multiple completed strings with other interested researchers.

 

Jelly Beans and Politics

By:  Alex Temple, Benjamin Gettler Papers Project Archivist

I’m currently working through Benjamin Gettler’s political work, and have just finished the first of six folders on his political correspondence.  So far I’ve identified 150 items, representing approximately 30 years of his work, views, correspondence, and recognition.  Largely, Gettler placed his energy into the Republican party, notably towards the Reagan/Bush campaigns.  His campaign aid for politicians earned him various accolades, such as an honorary address to the House of Representatives from Representative Brad Wenstrup; invitations to Inaugural Balls for Ohio Governor Bob Taft and President Ronald Reagan, and an invitation to visit the White House in 1982.

White House InvitationWhite House Invitation Continue reading Jelly Beans and Politics