Tell Us About Your Research Practices and Needs

In order for the University of Cincinnati Libraries to provide the best possible research and data support services, we would like to encourage all faculty, staff and students to participate in a brief survey regarding your research practices and needs.

Taking part in this survey is completely voluntary, but your participation will help us to continue and create more meaningful services centered around your research and data needs. If you agree to participate, please complete the survey via the URL provided to give us more information about your primary research area, the type of data used for your research, and the assistance sought to deal with your data. We appreciate your time and look forward to serving you.

https://redcap.research.cchmc.org/surveys/?s=NAAAF33RH4

Workshops on Research Reproducibility

Research Reproducibility Workshops

workshops facilitator April Clyburne-Sherin
workshops facilitator April Clyburne-Sherin

UC Libraries and IT@UC are pleased to offer two workshops on Research Reproducibility as part of the Data and Computational Science Series.  We are partnering with Code Ocean to offer these workshop on Oct 3rd and 4th.  The workshops facilitator is April Clyburne-Sherin from Code Ocean.  April is an epidemiologist, methodologist and expert in open science tools, methods, training and community stewardship. She holds an MS in Population Medicine (Epidemiology). Since 2014, she has focused on creating curriculum and running workshops for scientists in open and reproducible research methods and is co-author of FOSTER’s Open Science Training Handbook. She is currently the Director of Scientific Outreach for the reproducibility platform Code Ocean.  Code Ocean (https://codeocean.com/) is a cloud-based computational reproducibility platform that provides researchers and developers an easy way to share, discover and run code published in academic journals and conferences.  Their mission is to make the world’s scientific code more reusable, executable and reproducible.  More information and registration for the workshops can be found at the links below.  Questions?  Email AskData@UC.Edu.  The events are free and open to all.

Workshop 1 — East Campus, Biomedical and Clinical Focus

URL – https://webapps2.uc.edu/ce/FacDev/Workshops/Details/11432

Title: Integrating reproducible best practices into biomedical and clinical research: A hands-on workshop for researchers – Data And Computational Science Series

Date: Wednesday, Oct. 3, 1 – 3pm

Location: Troup Learning Space Conf Rm-MSB G005G

Workshop 2 — West Campus, General Audience

URL – https://webapps2.uc.edu/ce/FacDev/Workshops/Details/11433

Title: Preparing your data and code for reproducible publication: A hands-on workshop for researchers – Data And Computational Science Series

Date: Thursday, Oct. 4, 10am – 12pm

Location: CEAS Library Classroom 850D Baldwin

DCS2 CodeOcean_flyerV2

 

Hannah Stitzlein Joins UC Libraries as Metadata Librarian

Today, Hannah Stitzlein began work at the University of Cincinnati Libraries as the metadata librarian. Hannah was previously visiting metadata services specialist for the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. In this role, she developed best practices for the Illinois Digital Heritage Hub, taught metadata workshops, assessed digital collection metadata and developed workflows. Prior to her visiting position, Hannah spent three years with the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County. Her library experience also includes internships with Wisconsin Library Services, the Lloyd Library and Museum and the Henry R. Winkler Center for the History of the Health Professions. Hannah holds an MLS from the University of Wisconsin, Madison and a BFA from Pacific Northwest College of Art.

In the role of metadata librarian, Hannah will be responsible for providing leadership and guidance in the development and implementation of metadata and data management strategies to support discovery, access, management and preservation of the libraries physical and digital collections.

Welcome back to Cincinnati and to UC, Hannah!

How UC Researchers use the Open Science Framework – Emily Kean

As the first installment of the series “How UC Researchers use the Open Science Framework”, we hear from Emily Kean, Research and Education Librarian and Liaison for Nursing who is based at the Health Sciences Library.

Research Project Description or statement about your research interest I’m incorporated on several research teams from UC Health and the College of Nursing that are conducting systematic or integrative reviews. I’m responsible for generating reproducible search strings that will eventually be published as part of the review manuscripts.

Why did you chose to use the OSF to organize your research/projects? I needed an organization tool that allowed me to track my progress over time and also share my work privately with the entire research team. I used one or two other options before settling on the Open Science Framework. OSF seems to work best for my needs. Adding collaborators is very easy and the design is so intuitive, there isn’t much of a learning curve for training new team members.

What about the OSF makes this tool a good choice for your project management (i.e. specific function of the OSF)? I love the wiki and the fact that multiple people can edit and view the same content simultaneously. Most of my process is documenting term harvesting and testing and the wiki has been the perfect way to organize my work. My research partners can see my progress in real time, and at the end, I have reproducible search strings.

Additional information about the project or using the OSF that you are willing to share: None of my projects are currently public, but one of the features of the OSF that I’m looking forward to using is sharing my sites publicly after our manuscripts are published. Typically, only one search string for a systematic review would be printed, and the OSF will allow me to share all of the progress and multiple completed strings with other interested researchers.

 

Jelly Beans and Politics

By:  Alex Temple, Benjamin Gettler Papers Project Archivist

I’m currently working through Benjamin Gettler’s political work, and have just finished the first of six folders on his political correspondence.  So far I’ve identified 150 items, representing approximately 30 years of his work, views, correspondence, and recognition.  Largely, Gettler placed his energy into the Republican party, notably towards the Reagan/Bush campaigns.  His campaign aid for politicians earned him various accolades, such as an honorary address to the House of Representatives from Representative Brad Wenstrup; invitations to Inaugural Balls for Ohio Governor Bob Taft and President Ronald Reagan, and an invitation to visit the White House in 1982.

White House InvitationWhite House Invitation Continue reading Jelly Beans and Politics

University of Cincinnati Press and CLIPS to Receive Free Installation and Training on the Manifold Platform to Help Meet Digital Publishing Goals

On Thursday, Manifold, an open-source, web-based publishing platform that easily integrates the publication of networked and enhanced ebooks with existing publication workflows, announced that it had selected the University of Cincinnati Press and Library Publishing Services (CLIPS) as one of 10 groups to receive free installation and training on their platform.

Liz Scarpelli, director of the University of Cincinnati Press, said of their involvement: “Manifold will help us further our mission to publish new modes of scholarship and enhanced publications by providing a professional, agile and dynamic presentation site for our authors and readers.  We anticipate using Manifold for many of our publications from traditional monographs to digitally innovative projects designed to expand the dialogue between scholars and community based experts and practitioners.  We see Manifold as a key tool in our discoverability strategy at the University of Cincinnati Press and Cincinnati Library Publishing Services (CLIPS).  The mission based approach and affordability and technical support available through the pilot make Manifold an easy choice in partners for us.”

Read the Manifold press release below to learn more: Continue reading University of Cincinnati Press and CLIPS to Receive Free Installation and Training on the Manifold Platform to Help Meet Digital Publishing Goals

Most UC Libraries Closed Labor Day, Monday, Sept. 3

labor dayUC Libraries will be closed Monday, September 3 for Labor Day, except for the Donald C. Harrison Health Sciences Library, which will be open 9am-5pm. This closing includes the Walter C. Langsam Library 4th floor space, which will close Sunday, September 2 at 11pm and re-open Tuesday, September 4 at 7:45am.

A complete listing of library hours can be found online at www.libraries.uc.edu/about/hours.html.

Enjoy the long holiday weekend.

Join UC Libraries for “The Great American Read” and Vote for Your Favorite Novel

The Color Purple, Harry Potter, Gone Girl – is one of these your favorite novel? Did you enjoy or struggle reading The Grapes of Wrath, War and Peace or Heart of Darkness when assigned for class? Did you sneak read The Stand or Twilight when your teacher wasn’t looking? These favorite, or not-so-favorite, books are amongst the 100 best-loved novels up for consideration as “The Great American Read.”

The University of Cincinnati Libraries and CET are partnering to host three screenings of “The Great American Read,” 8-9 p.m., Tuesdays, Sept. 11 and 25 and Oct. 9 in the Digital Commons Space on the fourth floor of the Walter C. Langsam Library. The PBS series features some of the 100 best-loved novels with testimonials from celebrities, authors, notable Americans and book lovers across the country talking about their pick for “The Great American Read.” Fresh popcorn and refreshments will be served.

The themes of the three screenings will include:

  • Sept. 11 – The Great American Read Fall Kick-Off
    Join host Meredith Vieira in the search for America’s best-loved novel.
  • Sept. 25 – Heroes
    Take a journey with some literary heroes to examine what makes them complex and relatable.
  • Oct. 9 – What We Do For love
    Fall in love all over again with some of literature’s most beautiful romances.

 

RSVPs not required, but attendees are encouraged to mark “going” on the Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/298457014220539/.

Can’t join us for the screenings? Visit “The Great American Read” at http://www.pbs.org/the-great-american-read/home/ to learn more and vote for your favorite novel.

The Open Science Framework – a tool to help you organize and collaborate on research projects

Welcome back to campus!  As you begin to plan out your research projects or continue on going research, you may find a need to tie down all the working parts of your projects.  One tool that can help you is the Open Science Framework.  This tool developed by the Center for Open Science is a easy to use platform that allows you to create a structure to organize projects, invite collaborators, share within your research group and with the research community at large.  The mission of the COS is to promote transparency and reproducibility in research through practice and resource development.  Though the words open and science appear in the name, the projects you manage within the OSF are private from the start and made only public if you choose to share.  And you can share a part or all of the project as you wish.  And it is not just a STEM platform.  Any group needing to organize a project can use the OSF.  UC has a dedicated portal to the OSF at https://osf.uc.edu .

Over the next few weeks, stop back to Liblog to learn more about how UC researchers are using the OSF to facilitate their research projects.

Dean’s Corner: Welcome Back UC!

I am currently visiting Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia for the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) World Library and Information Congress along with some of my colleagues from UC Libraries, but I’m excited to return to UC and greet our new and returning students and faculty.

At IFLA’s World Conference with Library Chief Technology Officer May Chang and Global Services Librarian Hong Cheng. Behind us is Kuala Lumpur’s famous Petronas Towers.

Before we dive into the fall semester, here’s a brief overview of the last few months at UC Libraries.

Several key library positions were filled over the summer, including: associate director of business affairs Jeremy Berberich; business and data analytics librarian Maggie Patel; associate dean of library services Brad Warren; and content analyst Dorcas Washington. The Digital Scholarship Center also continued to grow, welcoming digital scholarship library fellow Erin McCabe and data visualization developer Ezra Edgerton. They joined software developer Zhaowei Ren, with the support of a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

UC Libraries joined HathiTrust, a national and international partnership of research institutions and libraries.

The Winkler Center Advisory Board hosted the annual Cecil Striker Society Lecture, “Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Impacting the Health of Children in Our Community and the World: The Past, Present and Future,” with co-lecturers Michael K. Farrell, MD and Bea Katz, PhD.

Continue reading Dean’s Corner: Welcome Back UC!