Answering the call: 25th General Hospital featured in UC Magazine

Barbara Lincoln Ashbaugh with patients in Tongres (Belgium)
Barbara Lincoln Ashbaugh with patients in Tongres (Belgium)

The April edition of UC Magazine features an article based on Courage and Skill in World War II: 25th General Hospital, a UC Libraries online exhibit. Additional photographs, texts and video can be viewed from the digital collection.

During the summer of 1941, the U.S. Army invited the University of Cincinnati to organize the 25th General Hospital to serve as a major medical facility in the European war theater. More than 600 physicians, surgeons, nurses, and enlisted men served the 25th with distinction in England, France, and Belgium until the end of the war. An earlier incarnation of the 25th had bravely served on the battlefields of World War I.

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Now Available: JoVE (Journal of Visualized Experiments)

The Neuroscience, Bioengineering, and General sections of the Journal of Visualized Experiments are now available!

As its name implies, the Journal of Visualized Experiments (JoVE) is a combination of text and video.  This peer-reviewed, PubMed indexed journal captures and transmits experimental techniques for life science research, providing advanced state-of-the-art techniques more quickly to the research community.   Learn more about JoVE.

View one of the video-articles entitled: Inducing Dendritic Growth in Cultured Sympathetic Neurons

JoVE welcomes participation and contributions; find out how you can submit video-articles to this dynamic journal.

Find the  Neuroscience, Bioengineering, and General sections of the Journal of Visualized Experiments (JoVE) on the library’s journal list at http://aj2vr6xy7z.search.serialssolutions.com/

A Look into the World of Landscape Architecture: The Myrl E. Bottomley Collection

By Janice Schulz

Myrl Bottomley
Professor Myrl E. Bottomley

In 1922, the College of Engineering and Commerce started a new degree program in Architecture that included a few classes in Landscape Design. The classes were well received, and when the Architecture Department moved to the newly created School of Applied Arts in 1925, a complete degree in Landscape Architecture was offered. With the growth of the Landscape program and the School of Applied Arts, a dedicated professor was needed to lead the Landscape Architecture program. Enter Professor Myrl Elijah Bottomley in 1926. A native of Michigan, Bottomley earned his Bachelor of Science degree from Michigan State College in 1916. He served in World War I as a lieutenant on the front lines in France, where, as a result of gas attacks, he developed health issues that would stay with him for the rest of his life. After returning from the war, he earned a Master of Landscape Design from Cornell University in 1922. Before coming to UC he served as Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture at Iowa State College from 1922-1925. Continue reading A Look into the World of Landscape Architecture: The Myrl E. Bottomley Collection

Documenting a Lifetime of Service: The Papers of Theodore M. Berry Now Available

Theodore M. BerryBy Kevin Grace, UC Archivist and Head of the Archives and Rare Books Library

Theodore M. Berry (1905-2000) was a key figure in American civil rights in the 20th century, a man who marked his life with a formidable sense of justice. From the 1930s, when he graduated from the University of Cincinnati with bachelor’s and law degrees, until his death just before a new century, Berry worked tirelessly to promote racial harmony and served with distinction in President Lyndon Johnson’s programs for civil rights during the 1960s.

Three decades ago, Berry donated his papers to the University of Cincinnati where they are housed in the Archives and Rare Books Library.

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Edythe Klumpp and the "Case of the Century"

By Janice Schulz

Every city in every era seems to have its “Crime of the Century” and during the 1950s in Cincinnati, that was the 1958 murder of Louise Bergen, a Cincinnati housewife.  The trial of her accused killer, Edythe Klumpp, was held during the summer of 1959. The case was sensational for many reasons – a “love triangle” between Edythe, Louise, and Louise’s husband, Bill Bergen; Edythe’s history of two divorces and other affairs; the participation of Foss Hopkins, Edythe’s defense attorney; the specter of the death penalty for a woman; and the controversial role of Ohio Governor Michael DiSalle in Edythe’s ultimate fate.

Edythe Klumpp Booking
Edythe Klumpp’s booking photographs. From the collection of the UC Archives & Rare Books Library

Louise Bergen’s body was found burned near the public beach at Cowen Lake on the evening of November 1, 1958. The subsequent investigation zeroed in on Bill Bergen’s live-in lover, Edythe Klumpp, who confessed after failing a lie detector test. Edythe claimed that the killing was accidental, that a gun went off during a struggle and hit Louise in the throat. But Hamilton County Prosecutor C. Watson Hover disagreed, charging her with first degree murder and seeking the death penalty.

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Langsam Library Exhibit Features Graphic Novels

By Janice Schulz

You would probably not be surprised to learn that UC Libraries hold copies of Malcolm X’s biography, Fahrenheit 451, Shakespeare’s Macbeth, and Treasure Island. What might surprise you, however, is that these are all titles of graphic novels. A new exhibit currently on display on the fourth floor of Langsam Library features these and many of the other graphic novels available in UC Libraries’ collections. The exhibit was curated by Janice Schulz, University Records Manager and Archives Specialist, and designed by Cole Osborn, former design student.

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