New Health Sciences Distance Learners Guide

Below today’s hours and the enhanced location maps on tLinks to the Distance Learners guide, UCL Workshops, and UC eJournalshe left-side of the redesigned Health Sciences Library website are three images that link to a new guide for health sciences distance learners, a list of workshops offered by UC Libraries, and a list of UC eJournals. The list of workshops and eJournals are familiar features of the HSL website but the Health Sciences Distance Learners guide is new with the website redesign. Continue reading New Health Sciences Distance Learners Guide

Redesigned Health Sciences Library Website Coming Soon!

HSLhome

On May 6, the Health Sciences Library along with all UC Libraries will unveil a completely redesigned website.

Available at http://libraries.uc.edu/hsl/ (same URL as current site) the new website is easy to read and navigate with an updated look and feel, an uncluttered homepage with most content viewable without scrolling, new information and streamlined navigation. User-requested features such as the posting of today’s hours, enhanced location maps and a prominent link to Off-Campus Access from the homepage are included in the redesign.

New content around the growing subject of digital scholarship has been added, as well as a website dedicated to the Libraries’ Special Collections. Also featured prominently on the site are links to HSL Research Guides, a Distance Learning guide, workshops, eJournals and frequently used Health Sciences resources.

The tabbed search box, available on the left-side of the homepage and throughout on many secondary pages of the site, will allow users to search for articles, books, journals, databases and quickly and easily.

For those viewing the site on a tablet or mobile device, the redesign is responsive to adjust to individual screen sizes.

The website redesign does not include the Library Catalog or online databases.

Feedback is welcome as the Health Sciences Library website is a work in progress and will continue to develop over the summer.

Watch for more information about the newly redesigned HSL site!

 

 

Announcing a Redesigned UC Libraries Website

homepage

On May 6, the University of Cincinnati Libraries will unveil a completely redesigned website.

Available at www.libraries.uc.edu (same URL as current site) the new website is easy to read and navigate with an updated look and feel, an uncluttered homepage with most content viewable without scrolling, new information and streamlined navigation. User-requested features such as the posting of today’s hours, enhanced location maps and a prominent link to Off-Campus Access from the homepage are included in the redesign.

Continue reading Announcing a Redesigned UC Libraries Website

New: Comprehensive Physiology

compphysComprehensive Physiology is an authoritative collection of review content assembled in the physiological sciences.

This publication includes the complete content from the Handbook of Physiology series and will be continually expanded through a dynamic program of updates.  The audience for Comprehensive Physiology is academic scientists in the life sciences, advanced students in the life sciences and medicine, instructors in these disciplines, and academic clinicians.

Key Features:

  • More than 30,000 pages of classic content from the Handbook of Physiology series
  • A publishing program that will add 4,000 pages of new content per year
  • An editorial team comprising leading names in the field
  • Fully citable content, qualifying for abstracting, indexing, and ISI ranking

Go to the Health Sciences Library eBook page to find a link to Comprehensive Physiology in the A-Z list.

New Digital Collection: The Elliston Project: Poetry Readings and Lectures at the University of Cincinnati

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The Elliston Project holds over seven hundred recorded readings and lectures given under the auspices of the University of Cincinnati Department of English and Comparative Literature and the U.C. Libraries since 1951. Material includes readings and lectures on poetry by those who have served as George Elliston Poet in Residence, among whom are Robert Frost, Denise Levertov, Louise Glück, Thom Gunn, and C.D. Wright. Other major figures, including Czeslaw Milosz, Derek Walcott, Seamus Heaney, and Rita Dove, are also represented, as are many prose writers and a wide range of poets at various stages of their careers. Readings in this ongoing audio archive feature poets’ comments on their work; both complete performances and individual poems are accessible.
Continue reading New Digital Collection: The Elliston Project: Poetry Readings and Lectures at the University of Cincinnati

Digitized Correspondence and Photographs of Albert B. Sabin Available on the Web

sabin1The University of Cincinnati Libraries have completed a  three-year project to digitize the correspondence and photographs of Albert B. Sabin,  developer of the oral polio vaccine and distinguished service professor at the University of Cincinnati’s College of Medicine and Children’s Hospital Research Foundation from 1939-1969.

The collection is freely and publicly available via the Albert  B. Sabin website at http://sabin.uc.edu/ and includes approximately 35,000 letters and accompanying documents totaling 50,000 pages of correspondence between Sabin and political, cultural, social, and scientific leaders around the world. Also included are nearly 1,000 photographs documenting the events and activities worldwide that were part of Sabin’s crusade to eradicate polio. Continue reading Digitized Correspondence and Photographs of Albert B. Sabin Available on the Web

UC Libraries Donation Becomes a Sizeable Challenge in Preservation

By Dawn Fuller

UC Libraries will host a special reception to celebrate the installation of one of the most extraordinary urban maps in the Western world in the Archives & Rare Books Library. The reception will take place from 3-5 p.m., Monday, April 22, in the Reading Room of the Archives & Rare Books Library, located on the 8th floor of Blegen Library.

Continue reading UC Libraries Donation Becomes a Sizeable Challenge in Preservation