UCBA Library Hosts 1st Faculty Lightning Talks

lighting talk graphic

By Lauren Wahman

 

These short, 15-minute presentations will showcase faculty research and share different aspects of the research process.

Thursday, March 22 2:00-3:00 pm
Muntz 117

Sonja Andrus
‘So, You Teach for Transfer. Do You Know What You’re Looking For?’ A Quick Look at Transfer in Two-Year College Students

Wendy Calaway & Keshar Ghimire
Evidence From Classroom Research:  Evaluating Students’ Perceptions Toward Courts and Police

Heather Vilvens
Creating Effective Safe Sleep Messaging for Caregivers of Infants Less than 1 Year Old

Faculty Publications on Display in the UCBA Library

By: Christian Boyles and Lauren Wahman

Faculty publications book display
Books (print and electronic) written or edited by UCBA faculty

 

The UCBA Library’s display for the month of March features a selection of books and journal articles written by UCBA faculty.  It includes works of poetry, the history of UCBA, technology’s impact on teaching and learning, and how Glee influenced pop culture and social issues.  The display can be found at the entrance of the library and on the reference shelf near the print station.  The displays will be available through March 31st.

articles on display
Journal articles, from a range of disciplines, written by UCBA faculty

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spring Break Hours for UCBA Library

spring  break graphic

The UCBA College Library will have the following hours during Spring Break:

  • Saturday, March 10:  CLOSED
  • Monday, March 12 – Thursday, March 15:  12:00 pm – 5:00 pm
  • Friday, March 13:  12:00 pm – 4:00 pm
  • Saturday, March 17:  CLOSED

The Library will resume regular Spring Semester hours on Monday, March 19th at 7:30 am.

Please visit our hours webpage to view all UCBA Library hours, including holidays and any exceptions to our regular schedule.

Design the UCBA Library’s National Library Week Button

Button Contest Graphic

Create the winning design for our National Library Week buttons and win a $30 UC Bookstore Gift certificate and bragging rights!

Design a 2.25 inch button. Guidelines and templates can be found on the Button Design Contest page. Design submissions will be accepted from March 5 – March 30, 2018. Submit final designs in PDF or JPG format to: ucbalibrary@ucblueash.edu.

The winning design will be determined using a blind submission and voting process among the UCBA Library Team.  Voting team members will not be aware of the students responsible for the button designs during the voting process. The winner will be notified on Monday, April 2, 2018.

From the Desk of…Christian Boyles

Christian Boyles, Collection Services Manager, UCBA Library.

Welcome to my desk, I hope you like it.  Up until a few months ago, my space was pretty barren.  That all changed when a co-worker told me that I “needed more $h!t in my area.”  I hope I rose to the occasion.

 

The UCBA Library’s Book of the Month

by Christian Boyles

February 2018

A History of the United States in Five Crashes book cover

A History of the United States in Five Crashes
HB3722 .N39 2017

About the Book

In this absorbing, smart, and accessible blend of economic and cultural history, Scott Nations, a longtime trader, financial engineer, and CNBC contributor, takes us on a journey through the five significant stock market crashes in the past century to reveal how they defined the United States today.

The stories behind the great crashes are filled with drama, human foibles, and heroic rescues. Taken together they tell the larger story of a nation reaching enormous heights of financial power while experiencing precipitous dips that alter and reset a market where millions of Americans invest their savings, and on which they depend for their futures. Scott Nations vividly shows how each of these major crashes played a role in America’s political and cultural fabric, each providing painful lessons that have strengthened us and helped us to build the nation we know today.

A History of the United States in Five Crashes clearly and compellingly illustrates the connections between these major financial collapses and examines the solid, clear-cut lessons they offer for preventing the next one.

Is it checked out?  Don’t worry about it.  Here are some other titles on the subject.

Inside JobInside Job DVD cover (DVD) HB3722 .I57 2011Provides an analysis of the global financial crisis of 2008, which at a cost of over $20 trillion, caused millions of people to lose their jobs and homes in the worst recession since the Great Depression, and nearly resulted in a global financial collapse. Through exhaustive research, and extensive interviews with key financial insiders, politicians, journalists, and academics, traces the rise of a rogue industry which has corrupted politics, regulation, and academia.

Booms and Busts book coverBooms and Busts: an encyclopedia of economic history from Tulipmania of the 1630s to the global financial crisis of the 21st century(ebook): This authoritative set explores three centuries of good times and hard times in major economies throughout the world. More than 400 signed articles cover events from Tulipmania during the 1630s to the U.S. federal stimulus package of 2009, and introduce readers to underlying concepts, recurring themes, major institutions, and notable figures. Written in a clear, accessible style, “Booms and Busts” provides vital insight and perspective for students, teachers, librarians, and the general public – anyone interested in understanding the historical precedents, causes, and effects of the global economic crisis. 

After the Music Stopped book coverAfter the music stopped: the financial crisis, the response, and the work ahead. HB3717 2008 .B55 2013: Many fine books on the financial crisis were first drafts of history–books written quickly to fill the need for immediate understanding. Alan S. Blinder, former vice chairman of the Federal Reserve Board, takes the time to understand the crisis and create a truly comprehensive and coherent narrative of how the worst economic crisis in postwar American history happened, what the government did to fight it, and what we must do from here–mired as we still are in its wreckage. Blinder shows how the U.S. financial system, grown far too complex for its own good–and too unregulated for the public good–experienced a perfect storm beginning in 2007. When America’s financial structure crumbled, the damage proved to be not only deep, but wide. It took the crisis for the world to discover, to its horror, just how truly interconnected–and fragile–the global financial system is. Blinder offers clear-eyed answers to the questions still before us, even if some of the choices ahead are as divisive as they are unavoidable.

Now on Display for Black History Month and the African American Read In

The UCBA Library has two displays running for the month of February: the African American Read In display (located at the entrance of the library) and the Black History Month display (located near the print station). Both displays will be available through February 28th.

Titles from the African American Read-In display can be used for the college sponsored Read-In event scheduled for Thursday, Febuary 8, 2018 from 12:30pm-1:45pm in the Audiotorium lobby. Read In events are held nationally during Black History Month and highlights African American authors. A full list of titles can be browsed online on the National African American Read In Guide along with information on how to volunteer as a reader.

Black History Month Poster

 

 

 

 

Black History Month Display

Bookish Travels

by Christian Boyles, Michelle McKinney and Kellie Tilton

UCBA Library staff and faculty, Christian Boyles (Collections Services Manager), Michelle McKinney (Reference and Web Services Librarian) and Kellie Tilton (Instructional Technologies Librarian) hit the road and visited a few bookish places over the holiday season. Click on the images to get a better view of the photos.

Christian Boyles / Washington DC / Library of Congress: In December, the missus and I went to DC for her birthday.  Along with visiting many great Smithsonian museums, walking a gazillion miles, seeing grand architecture, priceless works of art and ephemera and the new Star Wars film, we went to the Library of Congress.  For someone who has worked in libraries for a gazillion years, going there felt like what going to the Vatican must feel like to a Catholic.

The building itself is an amazing and imposing structure designed in the Beaux-Arts style with a bonkers fountain out front featuring the Roman god Neptune, some sea monsters and a bunch of naked people riding what I guess are horse snakes.  What that has to do with literature and the centralized housing of knowledge was lost on me.  Inside is no less impressive.  Walking in, I was legitimately awestruck by the LOC’s grandeur.  Imagine if St. Peter’s Cathedral and some enlightenment era French king’s home had a baby and you’re still nowhere close to how awesome it is.  Probably the crown jewel of the place is the reading room. Housed under a dome, it is a masterpiece of archetecture featuring arched stained glass windows, semetrical study carrells, Corinthian columns, and statues of some of the great minds in religion, poetry, commerce, philosophy, etc.  Just looking in on that, I’m pretty sure I felt my IQ nudge up a couple points.  Throughout the building, there were displays of ancient manuscripts going back hundreds and thousands of years.

Unfortunately, we were running short on time, so we couldn’t take the tour.  But, we did manage to check out a very cool exhibit on the American experience of World War 1.  In a perfect world, I would have spent a day, if not more, discovering all the cool features and offerings.  Insider tip: if you’re in DC and are having a sugar crash, the LOC’s vending machines are very comprehensive and cheap.

Michelle McKinney / Louisville, KY / Wild Fig Coffee & Books: In early January, I treated my husband to a quick trip to Lexington for his birthday. Before heading back home, I discovered a bookstore just down the street from where we were having breakfast. Wild Fig Coffee & Books is located near UK’s campus and is owned by award-winning author, Crystal Wilkinson. The independent bookstore has an eclectic selection of new and old books, including a wide range of graphic novels. Wild Fig also carries a variety of bookish and feminist gifts such as mugs, socks and greeting cards. The coffee is pretty tasty too!

Kellie Tilton: On Christmas Day, 2017, a friend from college and I hopped the pond to begin an epic two week, three country excursion that was kick started because we snagged tickets to see Harry Potter and the Cursed Child Parts I & II in the West End. With our tickets falling in the week between Christmas and New Year’s Eve, we decided to make the most of the time frame.

We spent a handful of days in London – mostly in pursuit in all the Harry Potter-related attractions London had to offer – then it was up to Edinburgh, Scotland to bring in the New Year with their Hogmanay celebrations. We made a quick trip across the Channel via the Chunnel to have a gandar at Paris (and basically eat a million croissants) before landing back in London to spend one more weekend catching the things we missed the first time.

Highlights of this adventure include, but are not limited to, The Warner Brothers Harry Potter Studio Tour, The British Library (and it’s History of Magic exhibition in celebration of the 20th anniversary of Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone publishing), the play (obviously), Hogmanay, Kensington Palace, and the Paris Catacombs. I brought back four new editions for my Harry Potter in Translation Collection. It just goes to show, your literary loves will provide ample reasons to travel the world!