Oct. 30 Life of the Mind Lecture to Address the Topic of ‘Next’

life of the mindLife of the Mind, interdisciplinary conversations with UC faculty, will return 3-5 p.m., Tuesday, Oct. 30, in Annie Laws (407 Teachers/Dyer) with a lecture by Sarah Stitzlein, professor of education and affiliate faculty in philosophy. Professor Stitzlein will speak on “What’s Next for America? Teaching Hope and Reviving Democracy.”

Life of the Mind is a semi-annual lecture series that features a distinguished University of Cincinnati faculty member presenting his or her work and expertise. The series includes intriguing insights from diverse perspectives and encourages faculty and students from across the university to engage in further discourse. The presentation is not simply a recitation of the faculty member’s work but promotes an informed point of view.

Sarah M. Stitzlein is professor of education and affiliate faculty in philosophy. As a philosopher of education, she explores the purposes and practices of education from the perspective of social and political philosophy. She aims to uncover problems in education and envision better alternatives. Her work touches on issues of political agency, educating for democracy and equality in schools. She is president-elect of the John Dewey Society, editor of the journal “Democracy & Education” and winner of the UC Excellence in Teaching Award.

sarah stitzleinIn this presentation, she will share insights from her newest book, Reviving Hope in Democracy: Teaching Hope and Overcoming Despair in America (Oxford University Press, 2019). This book was awarded a Toward an Open Monograph System grant for Open Access publishing from the UC Office of the Provost, Association of American Universities, Association of Research Libraries and the Association of American University Presses.

The lecture takes up recent polls revealing alarming trends in America: citizens have become increasingly cynical, less certain that they can have an impact in democracy and more supportive of authoritarianism. Professor Stitzlein will detail shifts in the hope of citizens, including increased reliance on messianic political leaders to fulfill hopes, exhaustion amongst populations plagued by inequality and reduction of citizenship to personal responsibility and entrepreneurialism. The speaker will provide her perspectives on the dangers these changes pose in relation to democracy, the investigation necessary to understand these forces better and the reasons why what we hope for and how we hope together are crucial considerations as we strive to overcome despair and revive democracy.

A panel of three will respond to and discuss the lecture from diverse perspectives. The Oct. 30 Life of the Mind panel will consist of:

  • Wendy Calaway, assistant professor of criminal justice, UC Blue Ash College
  • Whitney Gaskins, assistant dean and assistant professor – Center for Inclusive Excellence & Community Engagement, College of Engineering and Applied Science
  • J. Antonio Islas-Munoz, assistant professor of practice, head of transportation design, College of Design, Architecture, Art and Planning

Sponsored by the Office of the Senior Vice President and Provost, and organized by the University of Cincinnati Libraries and Faculty Senate, the mission of Life of the Mind is to celebrate UC faculty research, scholarship and creative output and to foster the free and open exchange of ideas and discourse. Life of the Mind is free and open to the public and attracts a broad audience including UC students, faculty, staff and alumni, as well as people from the community.

More information about Life of the Mind is available online at www.libraries.uc.edu/lifeofthemind/.

Sidney Gao Joins UC Libraries as the Digital Imaging Coordinator

On Monday, Oct. 15, Sidney Gao joined UC Libraries as the new digital imaging coordinator in the Preservation Lab. Sidney comes to UC from UC San Diego (UCSD) where she has over four years of experience working in a digitization, imaging and preservation studio for Geisel Library. During this period, she perfected the ability to lead a production team in digitizing and archiving thousands of historical artifacts, documents, books and art pieces. As such, she has extensive experience in the application of various types of scanners and scanning techniques, as well as in image post-processing and various capturing software. Working in collaboration with UCSD Special Collections ensured her ability to handle rare and fragile objects, while simultaneously maintaining high digitization standards.

Welcome to UC Libraries, Sidney!

Visiting Librarian Yanli Liu Gave Her Final Presentation

Yanli Liu gave a presentation about data services and courses at the National Science Library, China Academy of Sciences

Yanli Liu and Amy Koshoffer co-taught a session for summer research students.

Hong Cheng, Ted Baldwin, Xuemao Wang, Yanli Liu, Leslie Schick at Yanli’s final presentation.

Yanli Liu, the visiting librarian from the National Science Library, Chinese Academy of Sciences completed her six-month period at the University of Cincinnati. Splitting time at the CEAS Library and the HSL Library, Yanli was involved in research data services, engineering librarianship, attending campus-wide workshops and webinars. On October 4th, she gave a final presentation about her two main projects: citation analysis of Mathematics and Physics researchers at UC and data management services survey and workshop.

 

Videos from Research Reproducibility workshops now available

Many thanks to all who attended the UC Libraries and IT@UC  Research Reproducibility Workshops offered on Oct 3rd and 4th.  We are especially thankful to April Clyburne-Sherin, Director of Scientific Outreach for Code Ocean who came and shared her knowledge part of the Provost sponsored Data and Computational Science Series.  The videos from the workshop are available through the STRC youtube channel and at these links:

Oct 3rd – Video – Integrating reproducible best practices into biomedical & clinical research : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V_VBmFNXWg0 

Slides – http://bit.ly/2DToKHt

Oct 4th – Preparing your data and code for reproductive publication: https://youtu.be/TkQbtEYXuUA 

Slides – shorturl.at/iwDVY

Also many thanks to Jay Sinnard and Jace Cheeseman for capturing and creating the videos.  We are grateful for the talent and knowledge in the STRC!

If you want to discuss research reproducibility or other data related issues, please contact the UC Libraries Research and Data Services Team at ASKDATA@UC.EDU.  

XSEDE HPC Workshop: GPU Programming Using OpenACC

XSEDE HPC Workshop: GPU Programming Using OpenACC

Free Registration (required)

Description:    The University of Cincinnati is pleased to be a remote site for the XSEDE HPC Workshop GPU Programming using OpenACC, taught by the Pittsburg Supercomputing Center. OpenACC is the accepted standard using compiler directives to allow quick development of GPU capable codes using standard languages and compilers. It has been used with great success to accelerate real applications within very short development periods. This workshop assumes knowledge of either C or Fortran programming.  Due to demand, this workshop is telecast to several satellite sites. Tentative Agenda

When:           November 6, 2018: 11am – 5pm

Location:    University Hall Room 454
51 Goodman Street
Cincinnati, OH 45221

Note:               You need an XSEDE account to register Create Account

Parking:          Kingsgate Garage, 151 Goodman Street

Special Instructions: Participants should bring their own laptop, lunch will be provided.

Questions?     Contact Amy Latessa latessak@uc.edu

XSEDE (eXtreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment) is a virtual system that provides compute resources for scientists and researchers from all over the country. Its mission is to facilitate research collaboration among institutions, enhance research productivity, provide remote data transfer, and enable remote instrumentation. XSEDE is funded by National Science Foundation (NSF).  Getting Started Guide for XSEDE.

Flyer – DCS2-OpenACC Nov 6, 2018

 

Join UC Libraries at Books by the Banks Oct. 20

On Saturday, Oct. 20, the 12th annual Books by the Banks: Cincinnati USA Book Festival will take place downtown at Duke Energy Convention Center from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Once again, UC Libraries is an organizing partner of the literary event that allows readers to meet and greet favorite authors.

The day-long festival will feature over 150 regional and national authors, book signings, author panels and activities for the entire family to enjoy. All events are free and open to the public.

At the festival, attendees will have the opportunity to meet authors and to purchase signed copies of their books. Books by the Banks features writers in various categories, including fiction, non-fiction, cooking, children’s literature, local travel, sports and more. Nationally known authors such as Nick Bruel, Wil Haygood, Alice McDermott, Sara Paretsky and Jason Reynolds will join local favorites Sharon Draper, Will Hillenbrand and Thane Maynard to celebrate the joy and reading of books. Continue reading Join UC Libraries at Books by the Banks Oct. 20

Some Blowpipe Equipment : Notes from the Oesper Collections, No. 52, September/October 2018

A portable Berzelius oil lamp for blowpipe analysis. The additional ring and alcohol lamp could be used to evaporate mineral water samples for analysis.
A portable Berzelius oil lamp for blowpipe analysis. The additional ring and alcohol lamp could be used to evaporate mineral water samples for analysis.

Issue 52 highlights items in the Oesper Collections related to the practice and teaching of blowpipe analysis.

Click here for all other issues from the Oesper Collections and to explore the Jensen-Thomas Apparatus Collection.

 

 

 

 

 

 

How UC Researchers use the Open Science Framework – Karlynn BrintzenhofeSzoc, CAHS-School of Social Work, Associate Professor

In our third installment of the series “How UC Researchers use the Open Science Framework”, we hear from

Karlynn BrintzenhofeSzoc, CAHS-School of Social Work, Associate Professor

Karlynn Brintzenhofeszoc, CAHS-School of Social Work, Associate Professor

 

Research Project Description or statement about your research interest:

I am working with a group of trans-disciplinary researchers who focus on the current state of care for older adults with cancer.  It is well known that enrollment of older adults into cancer clinical trials is not proportional to the number of older adults who are diagnosed with and treated for cancer.  Further there is little known about how older patients who participated in clinical trials respond to treatments.  And we do not have a clear understanding of the many factors that affect their quality of life during treatment such as drug tolerance levels or best practices in coordinating their care.

Additionally, The American Society for Clinical Oncology (https://www.asco.org/) published a call to increase the recruitment of older adults into trials.  One of the main recommendations they made is that journals develop policies that would involve a better reporting system that would encourage data to be analyzed and reported by age groups on efficacy and adverse effects.  This change could improve clinical practice and likely improve the quality of life of older adults.

Our research project will take a snapshot of the literature and focus on Phase III therapeutic cancer clinical trials.  We are conducting a systematic review of the literature for the time frame of July 1 2016 to June 30 2017.  One of the data points we are gathering is inclusion and exclusion criteria which have an upper age cutoff.  Already we see in the literature that there is an inconsistency in age reporting.  Also, it is difficult to find reports where the results are stratified for older adults.  And in order to set best practices, we believe researchers need to pay more attention to older adults when reporting outcomes.

This group of researchers and clinicians are a part of the Cancer and Aging Research Group (mycarg.org) which is a national advocacy group that funds and supports research to provide better coordinated care for older adults with cancer.

Why did you chose to use the OSF to organize your research/projects?

We started off using another workflow to assign readings to reviewers and it was a disaster in record keeping.   We couldn’t figure out what articles had been assigned to reviewers, and if and when they had completed their assigned readings.

Then I discovered the Open Science Framework (through an email from the library) and switched to using the OSF.  It was very easy to transition our workflow to this system.  We could set up projects in the OSF, connect with the reviewers by inviting them to be collaborators, and share their tasks through the OSF.  We created files (or components in the OSF) for each person.  We loaded their reading assignments into the project and were able to track when they opened the files.  So we knew what was getting done and what still needed to be addressed.  It was very easy to use, especially for collaborators with virtually no training needed.  There was no angst or pain with the system.  It is also very easy to add and remove collaborators.

What about the OSF makes this tool a good choice for your project management (i.e. specific function of the OSF)?

I LOVE the notification features.  We can track that the work is being done by the reviewers assigned.  And it is easy to extract the data from a collection document in the OSF into our REDCap data management system.

Additional comment for the post that you are willing to share:

A second group of clinicians and researchers who are members of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC; mascc.org) are starting another project using the OSF.  A CARG clinicians, who is leading this second project that is looking at shared decision making with older adults with cancer, has also decided to use OSF for the project.

The OSF has a lot of potential.  I personally could use it more, but would want additional training to understand all the functionality of the OSF.  And I love that the platform is accessible anywhere.

Currently our project is only accessible to collaborators, but it will be easy to open components of the project if we choose or need to share some of our findings.

 

Erin Rinto Joins UC Libraries as Teaching and Research Librarian

Today, Erin Rinto began work at UC Libraries as the new teaching and research librarian in the Research and Teaching Services Department located in the Walter C. Langsam Library. Erin comes to UC from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas where she was the teaching and learning librarian.  Over the past six years at UNLV, she worked to integrate information literacy outcomes into the general education program via sustainable, evidence-based approaches, thus providing her with extensive teaching and research experience. Erin’s primary responsibility will be working with the English Composition program, including serving on the cross-jurisdictional English Composition Committee.

Welcome to UC Libraries, Erin.

 

Bernstein, Shakespeare, Preservation Photographs and Dedicated Staff are All Featured in the Latest Issue of Source

source headerRead Source, the online newsletter, to learn more about the news, events, people and happenings in UC Libraries.

In this edition of Source we celebrate Leonard Bernstein at 100 with news of an exhibit on display in the Walter C. Langsam Library. Dean Xuemao Wang writes about how the occasion of the university’s upcoming Bicentennial has led him to reflect on the contributions of four staff members retiring this fall. We announce two grants received by the National Network of Libraries of Medicine that will promote good data and good health.

University archivist and head of the Archives and Rare Books Library Kevin Grace teaches readers and students in his honors class about Extra-Illustrated Editions. Jessica Ebert, lead photographic technician in the Preservation Lab writes about her work creating visual representations of the conservation treatments performed, and housing created, in the Lab. Mike Braunlin of the John Miller Burnam Classics Library offers his experience and insights gained working in the library for 42 years. The UC Foundation writes about a unique collection gifted to the Libraries from two former professors. Lastly, the annual Books by the Banks: Cincinnati USA Books Festival, of which UC Libraries is an organizing partner, is announced in this issue.

Read these articles, as well as past issues, on the web at http://libapps.libraries.uc.edu/source/ and via e-mail. To receive Source via e-mail, contact melissa.norris@uc.edu to be added to the mailing list.