UC Clermont Library Celebrates Student Workers

At UC Clermont Library, our student workers are an essential piece of how we serve you. They’re at the front lines to direct you to the right resource and ensure that our library remains the best place to be. This semester we had 4 excellent student workers with us until the end. Here are some highlights from those who wanted to share:

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UC Libraries closed for Thanksgiving Holiday

turkeysThe University of Cincinnati Libraries will be closed Thursday, November 24 and Friday, November 25 for Thanksgiving, with some locations closed the remainder of the holiday weekend and many library locations closing early on Wednesday, November 23 at 5pm. Check the listed hours for each library location’s specific hours.

Have a safe and happy Thanksgiving!

CCM Library to close early on Tues, 22 Nov, and Wed, 23 Nov!

Please note the exceptional closing times for the CCM Library this week:

Tuesday, 22 Nov         9am to close early at 6pm
Wednesday, 23 Nov    9am to close early at 5pm 
Thursday, 24 Nov       CLOSED all day (Thanksgiving break)
Friday, 25 Nov            CLOSED all day (Thanksgiving break)
Saturday, 26 Nov        CLOSED all day (Thanksgiving break)
Sunday, 27 Nov          CLOSED all day (Thanksgiving break)

UCBA Library’s Winter Book Crush

by Lauren Wahman

Looking for some good reads for the upcoming winter break? Find recently published novels, short stories, biographies, and more at the UCBA Library’s Winter Book Crush. Stop by for a book and a winter treat!

Find us across from the UCBA Library front entrance (next to the Café/Commons) on Tuesday November 29 from 12:30-2:00 pm.

Can’t make it during the above time?
The Winter Book Crush will move inside the UCBA Library from November 30 – December 9. Refer to the UCBA Library website for hours.

‘Indigenous Dispossession.’ UC Libraries exhibit highlights laws, treaties and policies that resulted in mass Indian Removal

In honor of Native American Heritage Month, the University of Cincinnati Libraries’ RESPECT (Racial Equity Support Programming to Educate the Community Team), presents the exhibit “Indigenous Dispossession: U.S. laws & policies promoting European settlement and Western Expansion resulting in Indian Removal from tribal, ancestral lands.”

illustration of native american woman

Rant Che Wai Me. From the McKenney and Hall digital collection.

On display on the 4th floor lobby of the Walter C. Langsam Library, the exhibit begins by listing the justification for European Settlement on Native American lands through the Doctrine of Discovery and Manifest Destiny, the ideas that the United States is destined to expand its dominion and to spread democracy and capitalism across the entire North American continent. The exhibit then goes on to list laws and acts such as the Northwest Ordinance, Indian Removal Act and the General Allotment Act that all contributed to the removal of Native American peoples from their tribal homes. It also includes information on the Indian Civilization Act, which aimed to “civilize” and “Christianize” Native children. What resulted was a loss of their culture and identity and a system of abuse.

native american man

Ne Sou A Quoit – A Fox Chief. From McKenney and Hall digital collection.

The second part of the exhibit, on display on the 5th floor lobby, outlines steps to rectify the early treatment of Native Americans by granting citizenship and ending allotment of tribal lands with such policies as the Indian Citizenship Act, the Indian Reorganization Act and the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act. It is noted, however, that while legislation around self-determination and self-governance offers a certain degree of independence and protection under the law, the legacy of displacement, oppression and neglect in American public policy affects Native communities and families to this day.

The exhibit highlights the collections of UC Libraries by featuring prominently illustrations from George Catlin who traveled the North American continent from 1830-1838 to chronicle the people, customs and traditions of Native American tribes and from Thomas Loraine McKenney and James Hall’s “History of the Indian Tribes of North America.”

native american village

From George Catlin’s “The Printed Works.”

To learn more, a bibliography of works from the collections of UC Libraries is available in print at the exhibit and online as a PDF.

The exhibit helps the RESPECT group in their mission to draw awareness of Systemic Racism, defined as “policies and practices that exist throughout a whole society or organization, and that result in and support a continued, unfair advantage to some people and unfair or harmful treatment of others based on race.”

Announcing the poets for the Nov. 30 Poetry Stacked

The University of Cincinnati Libraries and the Elliston Poetry Room announce the next set of poets for Poetry Stacked, a semi-regular poetry reading series held in the 6th floor east stacks of the Walter C. Langsam Library.

At the next event, scheduled for Wednesday, Nov. 30 at 4:30pm, three poets will read original works.

photos of poets

  • Rebecca Lindenberg is the author of Love, an Index (McSweeney’s) and The Logan Notebooks (Mountain West Poetry Series), winner of the 2015 Utah Book Award. She’s the recipient of an Amy Lowell Traveling Poetry Fellowship, an NEA Literature Grant, and a seven-month fellowship from the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, among other awards and honors. Her work appears in Poetry, American Poetry Review, Tin House, The Believer, McSweeney’s Quarterly Concern, The Missouri Review, Best American Poetry 2019 and elsewhere. She’s a member of the poetry faculty at the University of Cincinnati, where she also serves as poetry editor of the Cincinnati Review.
  • Manuel Iris. Poet Laureate Emeritus of the City of Cincinnati, Ohio (2018-2020). He received the “Merida” National award of poetry (Mexico, 2009) for his book Notebook of Dreams, and the Rodulfo Figueroa Regional award of poetry for his book The Disguises of Fire (Mexico, 2014). In 2016 two different anthologies of his poetic work were published: The Naked Light, in Venezuela; and Before the Mystery, in El Salvador. His first bilingual anthology of poems, Traducir el silencio/Translating Silence, was published in New York in 2018. This book won two different awards in the International Latino Book Awards in Los Angeles, California, in that same year. In 2021, he became a member of the prestigious System of Art Creators of Mexico (Sistema Nacional de Creadores de Arte). His latest book The Parting Present/Lo que se ira received the Reader’s choice award from the Ohioana Library Association, and was also recognized at the 2022 International Latino Book Awards.
  • Rome Hernández Morgan is a second-year doctoral student in English, Creative Writing at the University of Cincinnati where she is a Provost Fellow. She received her MFA from the University of Arkansas. She translates from Spanish and Portuguese and her poetry has appeared in BlackbirdThe Journal and New Ohio Review.

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UC Libraries closed Friday, Nov. 11 for Veterans Day

veterans day graphic

UC Libraries will be closed Friday, Nov. 11 in observance of Veterans Day.

Regular library hours will resume Saturday, Nov. 12.

To learn more about veterans at UC, check out this online exhibit from the Archives and Rare Books Library entitled “School & Country: Military Life at the University of Cincinnati.”

A Forgery amongst Renaissance and Baroque Paintings at DAAP!

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Exhibit of paintings

Exhibit of paintings-possibly Renaissance and Baroque from UC’s art collection

 Close up of two paintings in the exhibit.

DAAP Art History Prof. Chris Platts invites direct observation of these works of art from UC’s art collection to aid his classes (ARTH 5184 & ARTH 3021) in determining style, iconography, materials, function, patronage, and deeper symbolic meanings of the works. Prof. Platts is teaming up with UC geology and chemistry professors to give his students the chance to study an in-house mineral collection as a basis for analysis of paint pigments and how they were made in the Renaissance time period. As a class activity, the students will analyze these paintings from paint chips to date them and attempt to identify which one is a forgery.

Exploring Mont Reid’s Surgeries with Drs. John Bossert & William Camm

mont rogers reidJoin the Henry R. Winkler Center for the History of the Health Professions in the Stanley J. Lucas, MD Boardroom in the Donald C. Harrison Health Sciences Library Thursday, Nov. 10 at noon as Drs. John Bossert and William Camm lead a discussion while viewing three surgical films of one of the early 20th century’s finest surgeons, Mont Reid.

The three surgical films on view will include Cholecystectomy with Gallstones (1935), Toxic Thyroid & Cesarean Section (1935) and an Ovarian Cyst and Inguinal Herniotomy (1935). While the film rolls, Drs. Camm and Bossert will discuss surgical methods of Mont Reid’s, while at the same relating interesting anecdotes about his life and work. Audience feedback, questions, and discussion is encouraged. Light refreshments will be provided (registration is not required).