UC Libraries & The Elliston Poetry room present Poetry Stacked

poetry stacked flierThe University of Cincinnati Libraries and the Elliston Poetry Room announce Poetry Stacked, a semi-regular poetry reading series held in the 6th floor East stacks of the Walter C. Langsam Library.

Scheduled for Wednesdays, Oct. 19 and Nov. 30 at 4:30pm, each event will feature three poets reading their original poetry. Each session will include a UC faculty or staff member, a student and a local or national community member. Following each reading, attendees will be invited to tour the Elliston Poetry Room.

The mission of Poetry Stacked is to celebrate poetry and raise awareness of the collections of both UC Libraries and the Elliston Poetry Room. Each reading will engage audiences via exposure to contemporary poetry and increase appreciation for both the talents of UC and community poets, as well as for poetry itself. Poetry Stacked is free and open to all to attend.

Announcement of the Oct. 19 poets is coming soon. Stay tuned…

Updates to Libraries website for fall semester

screen shot of updated libraries websiteNext week, UC Libraries will make updates to the website in order to improve usability and discoverability, as well as to simplify navigation. These changes are reflective of results from user testing, analytics and edit requests received throughout the year. Where possible, redirects will be included, but please note new URLs listed below and update any bookmarks as necessary.

Updates include:

Please note, other library resources, including Summon, the Library Catalog and Library Guides integration into Canvas, have had or will also have updates. If you use these resources in your courses or research, we also recommend checking that your links, bookmarks and information are still up to date.

As always, contact us with questions.

Lori Harris named interim dean and university librarian

lori harris

Lori Harris

Lori E. Harris has been named interim dean and university librarian of the University of Cincinnati Libraries effective July 1, 2022. Harris initially joined the Libraries in 2015 as an associate fellow from the National Institutes of Health/National Library of Medicine (NIH/NLM). She permanently joined the University of Cincinnati Libraries in 2016.

Harris previously served as assistant dean and director of the Donald C. Harrison Health Sciences Library and the Henry R. Winkler Center for the History of the Health Professions. More recently, she co-led the development of the Libraries’ strategic framework NEXT Directions, which outlines the Libraries’ Guiding Principles and Pathways to operational excellence with special emphasis on initiatives relating to research, diversity, equity and inclusion and aligns with the University’s Next Lives Here framework. She has helped to support the College of Medicine’s LCME process by serving as a member of the reaccreditation committee and she currently sits on the College of Medicine’s Education Committee representing the Health Sciences Library.

Harris has worked tirelessly to build external relationships for the University of Cincinnati Libraries. Recently, she worked with Dr. Phil Diller, College of Medicine and the Henry R. Winkler Center Board, to bring to the university campus the six-part lecture series and exhibits that examined the work of Andreas Vesalius. Building upon her continued relationship and collaborations with colleagues from NIH/NLM, Harris helped bring to the Health Sciences Library the Native Voices traveling exhibition and lecture series, which honored the native tradition of oral history.

“I look forward to working with my University of Cincinnati Libraries colleagues in this new capacity,” said Harris. “Our recently completed Strategic Framework will provide the guiding principles and pathways for us to continue to advance our mission and realize our vision.”

Harris obtained her M.A. MSLS from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and her B.A. in American studies, museum studies and archives from Smith College, Northampton, Massachusetts.

In her new role, Harris will provide leadership and coordination for the daily operations of the University of Cincinnati Libraries, working collaboratively with the library leadership of UC Blue Ash, UC Clermont and Law Libraries. Harris will continue to work directly with UC Libraries’ senior leadership, faculty and staff to ensure that continuity, growth and development of the University of Cincinnati Libraries is maintained throughout her tenure as interim dean and university librarian.

UC Libraries resources in celebration of Juneteenth

juneteenthJuneteenth, a combination of June and nineteenth, commemorates June 19, 1865 when federal troops, led by General Gordon Granger, arrived in Galveston, Texas, and read General Order Number 3, freeing the quarter million enslaved people in Texas. This was two years after President Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation; however his edict could not be implemented in places still under Confederate control. This day came to be celebrated as Juneteenth.

Juneteenth is the oldest celebration of the ending of slavery in the University States. African American people have been commemorating it since 1865 with picnics, BBQs, church services and with some people traveling to Galveston to mark the day. In June 2021, President Biden proclaimed Juneteenth a federal holiday called Juneteenth Day of Observance. The University of Cincinnati, and UC Libraries, observes this holiday, and will be closed on Monday, June 20, 2022 in its honor. 

To learn more about Juneteenth, check out these sources: 

UC Libraries Resources 

The following is a short list of items located in UC Libraries about Juneteenth. There are many more books, articles, videos, etc. that can be searched through the Articles tab on the Libraries’ homepage. 

  • “On Juneteenth” by Annette Gordon-Reed. Located in the Walter C. Langsam Library, call number:  E185.93.T4 G67 2021
  • “Juneteenth : the story behind the celebration” by Edward T. Cotham, Jr. Located in the Walter C. Langsam Library Cohen Collection (on the white shelves in the front of the library), call number:  E185.93.T4 C684 2021
  • Juneteenth!: celebrating freedom in Texas by Anna Pearl Barrett.
  • Juneteenth:  fact sheet by Molly Higgins. Congressional Research Service – 

 General Resources: 

Life of the Mind celebrates the creative and scholarly works of UC’s Artists, Authors, Editors & Composers

The annual Life of the Mind, interdisciplinary conversations with University of Cincinnati faculty, was held Tuesday, Feb. 22, 2022. Jennifer Wright-Berryman, associate professor of social work in the College of Allied Health Sciences, presented “BEING A CAMPUS COMMUNITY THAT CARES: Emotional Wellbeing, Mental Health and Suicide Prevention at the University of Cincinnati.” 

Following Professor Wright-Berryman’s remarks, a panel of three responded to the lecture.

  • Calisha Brooks, mental health activist, Soul Care, LLC
  • Kelly Cohen, Brian H. Rowe Endowed Chair in aerospace engineering, College of Engineering and Applied Science
  • Xander Wells, UC student and president of Men4Mental Health
A recording of the lecture is available for viewing on the Libraries YouTube Channel.
bibliography coverThe Life of the Mind lecture series has merged with the former Authors, Editors & Composers to create one event that celebrates the achievements of UC’s Artists, Authors, Editors & Composers.

A bibliography of the submitted creative and scholarly works is available online.

The bibliography includes the works of 114 UC faculty and staff representing 14 colleges and units. The 166 submitted works include research journal articles, chapters, books, and editing. The creative and performing arts are well represented with poetry, artwork, public performances, videos, music and fashion. There are solo works, as well as multiple works representing collaborations with fellow scholars both at UC and around the world.

A selection of the submitted works is on display now on the 4th and 5th floors of the Walter C. Langsam Library. More information about Life of the Mind is available on the Libraries website.

Man Qi joins RDS team as a student research consultant

Man QiMan Qi is joining UC Libraries’ Research and Data Services (RDS) team as a student research consultant where she will provide consultations in the Data & GIS Collab in the Geology-Mathematics-Physics Library.

Her expertise is GIS software, hydrological modeling, SWMM modeling, geographic data processing, spatial analysis, map design, Python and R.

Man Qi is a PhD candidate in Geography & GIS from UC’s College of Arts and Sciences. She is passionate about helping others with data visualization and spatial data analysis. Her main job is to provide support to our UC community in spatial data processing and analysis (e.g., location analysis, spatial interpolation), map design and making using GIS techniques and hydrological modeling using SWMM. In addition, she also works with UC RDS team to develop workshops according to the UC community’s needs in learning GIS techniques, such as ArcGIS StoryMaps workshop.

Welcome, Man!

Accessibility in Opera — Opera NextGen

Generation NOW: Accessibility in Opera
Sunday, January 23 at 4pm EST

How can our community work towards a more equitable and accessible environment? Join Opera NexGen for Generation NOW: Accessibility in Opera. This roundtable discussion will address the existing ableism in opera and offer insight into how the disabled community of both opera professionals and audiences can be actively included in the industry. Admission is free, but registration is required.

Panel members:
Ju Hyeon Han, soprano
Stephanie Ko, General Manager, Opera Mariposa
Hailey McAvoy, mezzo-soprano
Jaime Sharp, General Director, Opera NexGen

Next lecture in The Illustrated Human series to examine the impact of Andreas Vesalius’s “Fabrica” publication

fabrica

The Fabrica

The Henry R. Winkler Center for the History of the Health Professions, University of Cincinnati Libraries and the College of Medicine are hosting a series of lectures and exhibits exploring the Renaissance anatomist and physician Andreas Vesalius (December 1514 – June 1564). Vesalius revolutionized the study and practice of medicine with his careful descriptions and anatomical studies of the human body published in “De humani corporis fabrica libri septem” (“On the Fabric of the Human Body in Seven Books”).

Join us Tuesday, Dec. 14 at 12:00 p.m. online via Zoom for the third lecture in the six-part series – “The Impact of Vesalius: Short-Term and Long-Term Perspectives.” Award-winning cultural historian Dániel Margócsy, PhD, University of Cambridge, will discuss the book he co-authored with Mark Samos, PhD, Alexander von Humboldt Foundation Fellow and senior research affiliate at the Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law, and Stephen Joffe, MD, professor, Department of Surgery, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, “The Fabrica of Andreas Vesalius. A Worldwide Descriptive Census, Ownership and Annotations of the 1543 and 1555 Editions.”

The initial reception of the 1543 edition was highly controversial and Vesalius encountered a great deal of criticism and attack by his former teachers and contemporaries. Slowly over time, the validity of his introduction of the scientific approach to teaching and learning human anatomy firsthand took hold and by the time of the second edition in 1555, the truths contained in the “Fabrica” were diffusing into medical schools across Europe.

Register to attend to the lecture.

More information about The Illustrated Human lecture series and accompanying exhibits is available on the Vesalius website.

The Illustrated Human: The Impact of Andreas Vesalius is sponsored by Stephen and Sandra Joffe.

The Illustrated Human. Register for an up-close-and-personal look of Vesalius’s groundbreaking 16th-century anatomy book

fabricaThe Henry R. Winkler Center for the History of the Health Professions invites you, as part of its Illustrated Human: The Impact of Andreas Vesalius lecture and exhibit series, to register for an up-close-personal look at Vesalius’s 1543 and 1555 editions of De humani corporis fabrica (“On the Fabric of the Human Body in Seven Books”). “Fabrica” was the most extensive and accurate description of the human body of its time. Most likely drawn by Vesalius colleague Jan Stephan a Calcar and Italian artist Titian, “Fabrica” is widely known for its illustrations, where skeletons and bodies with exposed muscular structures pose in scenic, pastoral settings.

Renowned Vesalius Scholar, Dr. Stephen Joffe will be at the Henry R. Winkler Center for the History of the Health Professions to remove the books from their cases and to share his thoughts and answer questions while leafing through their beautifully illustrated pages.

We invite you to attend at least one of these rare and intimate encounters with a book that changed not only the history of medicine and anatomy, but also how we as humans see our own bodies.

Dates: Tuesdays, Nov. 23, Nov. 30, Dec. 7 and Dec. 14

Time: 2:30-3:30 p.m.

Place: Donald C. Harrison Health Sciences Library/Henry R. Winkler Center for the History of the Health Professions

Please call or e-mail to make your reservation: (513)558-5120 or chhp@uc.edu

A full schedule of the Illustrated Human lectures, event location and registration details, as well as information about the accompanying exhibits, is included on the Vesalius web page.

Mozart in the Library

In the middle of the 4th floor of the Walter C. Langsam Library are three Yamaha digital grand pianos nestled in front of the Multimedia Productions Department. At different times of the day all three pianos are in use. When walking by, all you can hear from the pianos are the keys bottoming out, nothing harmonious, but rather a thud sound as each player presses the keys. Jay Sinnard, manager of the Multimedia Productions Department, recorded one of the students making those non-harmonious sounds, but from a different perspective. The student is freshman geology major Ian Rogers.

 

 

A collaboration between UC Libraries and the College-Conservatory of Music (CCM), the keyboards are open to anyone wanting to play on a first come-first served basis, but bring your own headphone as they are required.