Life of the Mind celebrates the creative and scholarly works of UC’s Artists, Authors, Editors & Composers

The annual Life of the Mind, interdisciplinary conversations with University of Cincinnati faculty, was held Tuesday, Feb. 22, 2022. Jennifer Wright-Berryman, associate professor of social work in the College of Allied Health Sciences, presented “BEING A CAMPUS COMMUNITY THAT CARES: Emotional Wellbeing, Mental Health and Suicide Prevention at the University of Cincinnati.” 

Following Professor Wright-Berryman’s remarks, a panel of three responded to the lecture.

  • Calisha Brooks, mental health activist, Soul Care, LLC
  • Kelly Cohen, Brian H. Rowe Endowed Chair in aerospace engineering, College of Engineering and Applied Science
  • Xander Wells, UC student and president of Men4Mental Health
A recording of the lecture is available for viewing on the Libraries YouTube Channel.
bibliography coverThe Life of the Mind lecture series has merged with the former Authors, Editors & Composers to create one event that celebrates the achievements of UC’s Artists, Authors, Editors & Composers.

A bibliography of the submitted creative and scholarly works is available online.

The bibliography includes the works of 114 UC faculty and staff representing 14 colleges and units. The 166 submitted works include research journal articles, chapters, books, and editing. The creative and performing arts are well represented with poetry, artwork, public performances, videos, music and fashion. There are solo works, as well as multiple works representing collaborations with fellow scholars both at UC and around the world.

A selection of the submitted works is on display now on the 4th and 5th floors of the Walter C. Langsam Library. More information about Life of the Mind is available on the Libraries website.

Man Qi joins RDS team as a student research consultant

Man QiMan Qi is joining UC Libraries’ Research and Data Services (RDS) team as a student research consultant where she will provide consultations in the Data & GIS Collab in the Geology-Mathematics-Physics Library.

Her expertise is GIS software, hydrological modeling, SWMM modeling, geographic data processing, spatial analysis, map design, Python and R.

Man Qi is a PhD candidate in Geography & GIS from UC’s College of Arts and Sciences. She is passionate about helping others with data visualization and spatial data analysis. Her main job is to provide support to our UC community in spatial data processing and analysis (e.g., location analysis, spatial interpolation), map design and making using GIS techniques and hydrological modeling using SWMM. In addition, she also works with UC RDS team to develop workshops according to the UC community’s needs in learning GIS techniques, such as ArcGIS StoryMaps workshop.

Welcome, Man!

Accessibility in Opera — Opera NextGen

Generation NOW: Accessibility in Opera
Sunday, January 23 at 4pm EST

How can our community work towards a more equitable and accessible environment? Join Opera NexGen for Generation NOW: Accessibility in Opera. This roundtable discussion will address the existing ableism in opera and offer insight into how the disabled community of both opera professionals and audiences can be actively included in the industry. Admission is free, but registration is required.

Panel members:
Ju Hyeon Han, soprano
Stephanie Ko, General Manager, Opera Mariposa
Hailey McAvoy, mezzo-soprano
Jaime Sharp, General Director, Opera NexGen

Next lecture in The Illustrated Human series to examine the impact of Andreas Vesalius’s “Fabrica” publication

fabrica

The Fabrica

The Henry R. Winkler Center for the History of the Health Professions, University of Cincinnati Libraries and the College of Medicine are hosting a series of lectures and exhibits exploring the Renaissance anatomist and physician Andreas Vesalius (December 1514 – June 1564). Vesalius revolutionized the study and practice of medicine with his careful descriptions and anatomical studies of the human body published in “De humani corporis fabrica libri septem” (“On the Fabric of the Human Body in Seven Books”).

Join us Tuesday, Dec. 14 at 12:00 p.m. online via Zoom for the third lecture in the six-part series – “The Impact of Vesalius: Short-Term and Long-Term Perspectives.” Award-winning cultural historian Dániel Margócsy, PhD, University of Cambridge, will discuss the book he co-authored with Mark Samos, PhD, Alexander von Humboldt Foundation Fellow and senior research affiliate at the Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law, and Stephen Joffe, MD, professor, Department of Surgery, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, “The Fabrica of Andreas Vesalius. A Worldwide Descriptive Census, Ownership and Annotations of the 1543 and 1555 Editions.”

The initial reception of the 1543 edition was highly controversial and Vesalius encountered a great deal of criticism and attack by his former teachers and contemporaries. Slowly over time, the validity of his introduction of the scientific approach to teaching and learning human anatomy firsthand took hold and by the time of the second edition in 1555, the truths contained in the “Fabrica” were diffusing into medical schools across Europe.

Register to attend to the lecture.

More information about The Illustrated Human lecture series and accompanying exhibits is available on the Vesalius website.

The Illustrated Human: The Impact of Andreas Vesalius is sponsored by Stephen and Sandra Joffe.

The Illustrated Human. Register for an up-close-and-personal look of Vesalius’s groundbreaking 16th-century anatomy book

fabricaThe Henry R. Winkler Center for the History of the Health Professions invites you, as part of its Illustrated Human: The Impact of Andreas Vesalius lecture and exhibit series, to register for an up-close-personal look at Vesalius’s 1543 and 1555 editions of De humani corporis fabrica (“On the Fabric of the Human Body in Seven Books”). “Fabrica” was the most extensive and accurate description of the human body of its time. Most likely drawn by Vesalius colleague Jan Stephan a Calcar and Italian artist Titian, “Fabrica” is widely known for its illustrations, where skeletons and bodies with exposed muscular structures pose in scenic, pastoral settings.

Renowned Vesalius Scholar, Dr. Stephen Joffe will be at the Henry R. Winkler Center for the History of the Health Professions to remove the books from their cases and to share his thoughts and answer questions while leafing through their beautifully illustrated pages.

We invite you to attend at least one of these rare and intimate encounters with a book that changed not only the history of medicine and anatomy, but also how we as humans see our own bodies.

Dates: Tuesdays, Nov. 23, Nov. 30, Dec. 7 and Dec. 14

Time: 2:30-3:30 p.m.

Place: Donald C. Harrison Health Sciences Library/Henry R. Winkler Center for the History of the Health Professions

Please call or e-mail to make your reservation: (513)558-5120 or chhp@uc.edu

A full schedule of the Illustrated Human lectures, event location and registration details, as well as information about the accompanying exhibits, is included on the Vesalius web page.

Mozart in the Library

In the middle of the 4th floor of the Walter C. Langsam Library are three Yamaha digital grand pianos nestled in front of the Multimedia Productions Department. At different times of the day all three pianos are in use. When walking by, all you can hear from the pianos are the keys bottoming out, nothing harmonious, but rather a thud sound as each player presses the keys. Jay Sinnard, manager of the Multimedia Productions Department, recorded one of the students making those non-harmonious sounds, but from a different perspective. The student is freshman geology major Ian Rogers.

 

 

A collaboration between UC Libraries and the College-Conservatory of Music (CCM), the keyboards are open to anyone wanting to play on a first come-first served basis, but bring your own headphone as they are required.

Read Source, the online newsletter, to learn about the news, events, people and happenings in UC Libraries

sourceRead Source, the online newsletter, to learn about the news, events, people and happenings in UC Libraries.

In this issue of Source, Dean Xuemao Wang takes time to reflect as work begins to transition back on campus and we showcase UC Libraries innovation and impact during the pandemic. In addition to articles highlighting collections such as Albert Sabin’s papers and Obed Wilson’s library, this issue also marks the commemoration of the first national Juneteenth holiday and features an interview with the authors of the recent University of Cincinnati Press book, Bicycling Through Paradise. As our 19th year of publication comes to a close, we feature a retrospective of past covers and a look back at the 2009 Edible Books event.

Read these articles, as well as past issues, on the website. To receive Source via e-mail, contact melissa.norris@uc.edu to be added to the mailing list.

 

And the winners are…Results of the 2021 UC Libraries International Edible Books Festival

squirrel with donut cake

Best Overall – Rebecca Tabaja – Donut Feed the Squirrels

The University of Cincinnati Libraries celebrated the annual International Edible Books Festival on April 5-9, 2021.

A record 31 edible books were created and featured throughout the week on the Libraries Facebook page, as well as on Twitter and Instagram. Submitted entries included such edible titles as “Coffee,” “LuLu’s Giraffe Bakery,” and “Donut Feed the Squirrels.” Best sellers “Lord of the Rings,” “The Handmaid’s Tale,” “Catch-22,” “Super Fudge” and “The Picture of Dorian Gray” were represented along with children’s books like “Jolly Postman,” “Hair Love,” “Rainbow Fish,” “Little Blue Truck Leads the Way” and “Madeline,” among other literary greats. The edible books were made of cakes, cookies, candy, deviled eggs and even sushi.

Created by librarian Judith A. Hoffberg and artist Béatrice Coron, the International Edible Books Festival is held worldwide annually on or around April 1st to mark the birthday of Jean Brillat-Savarin, author of The Physiology of Taste.  The global event has been celebrated since 2000 in various parts of the world, including in Australia, Brazil, India, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, Mexico, Morocco, The Netherlands, Russia and Hong Kong. Continue reading

University of Cincinnati Art Collection now available online

painting of ballerinas

Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo by P. Davison,1940

The University of Cincinnati Art Collection, with over 4,200 works, is now available online for viewing, as well as to be used in teaching, research and in the creation of university exhibits.

Available at artcollection.uc.edu, users of the database can locate works by portfolio, through searching or by browsing by medium/technique, artist/maker or artwork classification. Once located in the database, individual items can be starred and then saved or printed in list format. In addition, the UC Art Collection website includes links to learn more about exhibits, related university collections and archives, the museum studies program and arts news.

painting of men on a pier

Nooning on the Pier by Julie Morrow DeForest

The UC Art Collection is international in scope and includes paintings, sculpture, prints, drawings, photographs, furniture, ceramics and decorative arts spanning five millennia, from ancient Greece to the present day. Works of art from the U.S. forms one of the core areas in the collection with the art of Cincinnati, especially that produced during the late-19th and early-20th centuries, as a particular strength with pieces from Elizabeth Nourse, Lewis Henry Meakin, Frank Harmon Myers, Herman Henry Wessel, Louis Charles Vogt and John Ellsworth Weis.

In 2020, the College of Design, Architecture, Art, and Planning (DAAP) and the University of Cincinnati Libraries announced a new collaboration to manage the collection and to bring more visibility, accessibility and use of this valuable resource. This creation of the database project has been made possible through the generous support of executive vice president for academic affairs and provost Kristi Nelson; Tim Jachna, dean of DAAP; Xuemao Wang, vice provost for digital scholarship and dean and university librarian; the Art Collection Executive Committee, the Art Collection Advisory Committee and Planning, Design + Construction.

Know of a good book to eat?! Create an Edible Book for UC Libraries International Edible Books Festival, April 5-9

edible books graphicThe University of Cincinnati Libraries is seeking people interested in creating an edible book for the viewing enjoyment of all. There are few restrictions – namely that the creation be edible and have something to do with a book – so let your creativity run wild.

Rather than gathering at a designated day, time or place, this year’s Edible Books Festival will take place the week of April 5-9 online. Each day, a few edible book entries will be showcased on the Libraries Facebook page, Twitter and Instagram accounts, as well as on the website

edible book with hotdogs and cake

Attack of the Vampire Weenies

As in previous years, entries will be judged according to such categories as “Most Delicious,” “Most Creative,” “Most Checked Out” and “Most Literary,” as well as “Best Student Entry” and “Best Overall.” The week will culminate with the announcement of the winners.

If you are interested in creating an edible book, e-mail melissa.norris@uc.edu by Friday, March 26 with your name and the title of your creation.

Looking for inspiration? Visit UC Libraries on Facebook to see photos from the 2019 festival.