“An Evening with Aristophanes” in the Classics Library March 28

evening with AristophanesJoin the John Miller Burnam Classics Library, Thursday, March 28 from 5:00 to 7:00 p.m., in celebrating the life and work of the Greek comedy playwright Aristophanes.

The evening will include remarks by Rebecka Lindau, head of the Classics Library; a brief presentation of Aristophanes’ life and work by Susan Prince, associate professor of classics; and a reading of the play Lysistrata in Jeffrey Henderson’s Loeb translation, under the direction of Brant Russell, assistant professor of acting. The play will feature students from both UC’s Classics Department and from the College-Conservatory of Music (CCM). True to ancient Greek drama, music will further accompany the entrances and exits of the chorus and interludes, under the direction of Yo Shionoya, a graduate student in CCM.

The evening will conclude with a reception including Greek food.

The event will be presided over by the Greek god Dionysus who will greet all revelers at the door. The Classics Library will also feature a book exhibition with works of Aristophanes, including rare editions.

Please RSVP to Cade Stevens at stevencd@ucmail.uc.edu or (513) 556-1314 by Monday, March 25.

Three Recent Articles Highlight Work being done in the Digital Scholarship Center

Three recent articles from faculty and staff working in or with the university’s Digital Scholarship Center demonstrate the transdisciplinary, enterprise-wide research mission of the center. In these three articles, topics include information science, new media and communications, and digital scholarship/digital humanities:

“Embracing semantic ambiguity to enhance interpretability of complex unstructured machine learning problems.” – https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/pra2.2018.14505501144

“Tweeting for social justice in #Ferguson: Affective discourse in Twitter hashtags” – https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/1461444819827030?casa_token=mSwlsllzyaQAAAAA:o8PzOiTUUyS1zCblmTKMvkE1HBromRj1bXExxvk8qiZVg0LItZlr9Ne5y9EW10EqqpWPqi4KwvDI

“Epic social networks and Eve’s centrality in Milton’s Paradise Lost” – https://academic.oup.com/dsh/advance-article/doi/10.1093/llc/fqz001/5365481?guestAccessKey=71453a56-cfdb-48f2-a5bc-ae279bf4b0ac

The University of Cincinnati’s Digital Scholarship Center, located in the Walter C. Langsam Library, is a joint venture between the College of Arts and Sciences and the Libraries.

On campus and in the community, the DSC serves as a catalyst for hybrid forms of research and teaching, bringing together humanistic methods with technical innovations to test paradigms and to create new knowledge at the boundary between disciplines as they are conventionally imagined in humanities.

For more about the DSC, visit their website at http://dsc.uc.edu/

New Langsam Library Exhibit – “Animals in Antiquity” as Reflected through Books and Artifacts in the John Miller Burnam Classics Library

animals in antiquityOn the fifth floor lobby of the Walter C. Langsam Library is the exhibit “Animals in Antiquity: An exhibition from the collections of the John Miller Burnam Classics Library.”

Curated by Rebecka Lindau, head of the John Miller Burnam Classics Library, and Michael Braunlin, assistant head of the  Classics Library, and designed by Michelle Matevia, library communication design co-op student, the exhibit highlights the role and importance of animals in Antiquity.

Bastet the Cat
Cats were sacred in ancient Egypt. There was even a cat goddess, Bastet.

Animals were divinities, especially in Egypt.  In Ancient Greece and Rome they were the companions or theomorphic stand-ins for gods and goddesses. Many animals were considered sacred to the ancient Greeks and Romans. However, as humans went from a nomadic existence to one of settlers and farmers, they began taming and using animals for their own purposes and so the status of animals began to decline.

After their domestication, bulls, cows, horses, donkeys, pigs, sheep and goats were used to plow fields, to provide milk and meat, transportation, and clothing. Wild boars were hunted for food and for “displays of manhood” by well-to-do young men as were various birds, deer, hares and even lizards.  Some animals were made companions or pets such as sparrows, pigeons, doves, dogs, cats, monkeys and even wild animals, gazelles and cheetahs. Animals in Greece, rabbits, dogs, roosters and doves, were given as presents, also in courtship as “love gifts.”

Foxes were wild and often considered a nuisance for wine growers because they liked eating the vines.

Various kinds of fish were eaten in antiquity, but they, too, could be pets and were sacred to the gods. Animals such as horses and elephants were used in war and as entertainment, for example, among the Romans at the Colosseum where lions, tigers, elephants, giraffes, bears, rhinoceroses, hippopotamuses, wild donkeys, hyenas and ostriches were forced to fight to their deaths. Greek and Roman authors such as Plutarch, Aelian and Pliny the Elder wrote about animals in works on ethics, morals and natural history and prose, poetry and history writers such as Homer, Aesop’s Fables, Lucretius, Ovid, Seneca, Dio Cassius, Diodorus Siculus frequently used animals to tell stories and to illustrate the human experience.

Sections of the exhibit inform how animals were used as entertainment, as companions, for ritual sacrifice, even in war. In addition, the exhibit features animals in art, displayed on coins, vases and statues. A bibliography of resources used in the creation of the exhibit is available on site and online as a PDF.

To learn more about Animals in Antiquity, read about or visit the Classics Library located on the fourth floor of Blegen Library where the books and artifacts featuring the texts and images in this exhibition are housed and where the librarian is happy to answer questions and offer research advice on this or any other topic concerning classical antiquity.

UC Libraries Seeks Books Good Enough to Eat for the International Edible Books Festival

20,000 Leagues Under the Sea
2018 Best Overall – 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea by Jessica Ebert

Know of a good book to eat?! Create an Edible Book for UC Libraries International Edible Books Festival!

It’s time once again for the fan-favorite International Edible Books Festival scheduled for Monday, April 1, 2019, from 1-2:00pm in the Walter C. Langsam Library’s 5th floor lobby. UC Libraries is seeking people interested in creating an edible book for the enjoyment (and consumption) of all in attendance. There are few restrictions – namely that your creation be edible and have something to do with a book – so you may let your creativity run wild.

t-shirtAs in previous years, entries will be judged according to such categories as “Most Delicious,” “Most Creative,” “Most Checked Out” and “Most Literary.” Those awarded “Best Student Entry” and “Best Overall” will win a limited-edition UC Libraries t-shirt.

If you are interested in creating an edible book, please e-mail melissa.norris@uc.edu by Friday, March 22 with your name and the title of your creation.

Looking for inspiration? Visit UC Libraries on Facebook to see photos from the 2018 festival.

Read Source to learn more about the news, events, people and happenings in UC Libraries.

source graphicRead Source, the online newsletter, to learn more about the news, events, people and happenings in UC Libraries.

In this edition of Source, Dean Xuemao Wang writes about the university’s Bicentennial and we announce an exhibit of books from the libraries that document the university’s 200 years.  We interview Brad Warren, associate dean of library services, and focus on the Visualization Lab located in the Geology-Mathematics-Physics Library.

An article from Rich Puff, assistant vice president of public relations & communications, Academic Health Center, honors Lucy Oxley, MD, ‘a pioneer and a servant leader.’ University archivist and head of the Archives and Rare Books Library Kevin Grace writes about James Landy’s 1876 images celebrating William Shakespeare

Lastly, we promote to upcoming events: Hidden Treasures: An Adopt-A-Book Evening on March 14 and the Cecil Striker Society Annual Lecture on May 15.

Read these articles, as well as past issues, on the web at http://libapps.libraries.uc.edu/source/ and via e-mail. To receive Source via e-mail, contact melissa.norris@uc.edu to be added to the mailing list.

Join Us Feb. 27 for UC Libraries’ Black History Month Celebration Featuring Author Carol Tongue Mack

carol tongue-mack flyerIn celebration of Black History Month, UC Libraries is holding an event featuring author Carol Tongue Mack who will discuss her book Being Bernadette: From Polite Silence to Finding the Black Girl Magic Within. In her memoir, Carol Tonge Mack takes us on a journey from a small town in Antigua to the streets of the South Bronx to private college life in New England to a career in academia.

February 27, 2:00 – 3:00pm, 465 Walter C. Langsam Library

The program will also include a book giveaway, cultural food favorites, spoken word poetry and student-shared study abroad experiences. The event is free and open to all.

________________________

Carol Tonge Mack is an accomplished leader in higher education. With nearly 20 years of experience, she has a longstanding commitment to mentoring and graduating scores of students, creating innovative strategies for success, empowering women to lead regardless of their position and collaborating with community stakeholders.

Currently, Carol is an assistant dean at the University of Cincinnati with the College of Arts and Sciences (A&S). For the past six years, she served as the college conduct administrator for academic misconduct and works collaboratively with the Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards.  She is the co-founder of the University of Cincinnati’s Black Women on the Move, an employee resource group designed to create systematic and holistic changes university-wide to support and empower Black female staff members. Carol also built the university’s first Cultural Competence Workshop Series for the academic advising staff in the College of Arts and Sciences.

And don’t miss – a table display featuring African-American authors and poets on display on the 4th floor of Langsam Library.

 

New Acquisitions-DAAP Library Special Collections

A new shipment of concrete poetry books has arrived in the Robert A. Deshon and Karl J. Schlachter Library for Design, Architecture, Art and Planning (DAAP). Titles by John M. Bennett, Jim Leftwich, Robin Crozier, César Figueiredo, Serge Segay and others.

Make an appointment with Interim DAAP Library Head Elizabeth Meyer or librarian Andrea Chemero to view them.

Photo of concrete poetry book cover Wave by John M. Bennett
Wave, by John M. Bennett
"Ripening of Meat," a poem from Co-Labor-ative Writing
“Ripening of Meat,” a poem from Co-Labor-ative Writing
Co-Labor-ative Writing by Editor Luigi-Bob Drake, cover photo
Various titles from new acquisitions.
New acquisitions.

 

Elliston Poetry Room Announces Its Spring Poetry Schedule

Elliston Poetry Room SignDo you like poetry? Interested in hearing poets talk about and read their work?

The Ellison Poetry Room, located in 646 Walter C. Langsam Library, announced its spring poetry schedule. All readings are free and open to the public. Book signings follow each reading.

NTOZAKE SHANGE: CELEBRATING AN ARTISTIC LEGACY THROUGH CONVERSATION AND PERFORMANCE

Featuring Dr. Shirlene Holmes, Aku Kadogo, RAHBI, the Cincinnati Black Theatre Company, College-Conservatory of Music (Acting), and The School for Creative and Performing Arts
February 15, 2019; 4:00 PM
Elliston Poetry Room, 646 Langsam Library
Sponsored by the Weinberger Center for Drama and Playwriting

ISHION HUTCHINSON

Poetry Reading
February 22, 2019; 4:00 PM
Elliston Poetry Room, 646 Langsam Library

MARY RUEFLE

2018-19 Elliston Poet-in-Residence
Lecture
March 6, 2019; 4:00 PM
Elliston Poetry Room, 646 Langsam Library

Poetry Reading
March 8, 2019; 4:00 PM
Elliston Poetry Room, 646 Langsam Library

XHENET ALIU & TIMOTHY O’KEEFE

Fiction and Poetry Reading
April 11, 2019; Time TBD
Elliston Poetry Room, 646 Langsam Library

THE ROBERT AND ADELE SCHIFF FICTION FESTIVAL

Featuring Sloane Crosley, Uzodinma Iweala, Katie Kitamura, and Brendan Mathews
April 17, 2019; 7:00 PM: Fiction Reading
April 18, 2019; 11:00 AM: Panel Discussion
April 18, 2019; 7:00 PM: Fiction Reading
April 19, 2019; 10:00 AM: Panel Discussion
All events take place in the Elliston Poetry Room, 646 Langsam Library

Named for the Cincinnati poet George Elliston, the Elliston Poetry Room houses a 20th-century poetry collection of over 10,000 books, magazines, records and recordings. Students and faculty interested in modern poetry can also take advantage of reading space and listening facilities, as well as poetry-writing workshops and poetry readings.

More information on each of these events may be found at: https://www.artsci.uc.edu/departments/english/creative-writing/visiting-writers-series.html

Prayer and Meditation Space Created in Langsam Library

prayer space flyerThe University of Cincinnati Libraries has partnered with UC Student Government to create a Prayer and Meditation Space in the Walter C. Langsam Library.

Located in room 451, the Prayer and Meditation Space is available for use 24/7 on a first-come basis, no reservations required. Use of the space is for quiet meditation, prayer or silent reflection. Please do not use this room as a lounge, study room or meeting room.

Announcing Katie Foran-Mulcahy as the Director of the CECH Library

Katie Foran-Mulcahy
Katie Foran-Mulcahy

On January 22, Katie Foran-Mulcahy started work as head of the College of Education, Criminal Justice and Human Services (CECH) Library.

Katie is not new to the university. She began her tenure at UC Clermont in 2010 as a beginning librarian, assuming the position of interim library director in 2014.  Since then, she has focused on strategic planning and data-driven, student-centered facilities projects. Katie was appointed as library director in 2015, and awarded tenure and promotion to the rank of associate senior librarian in 2016.

“Katie’s background is an excellent fit for serving the needs of the CECH community and contributing to the University of Cincinnati Libraries’ strategic priorities,” said Brad Warren, associate dean of public services. “Her professional interests and publications revolve around librarian-faculty collaboration, teaching and instructional technology.”

Katie holds a Master of Science in Library Science and a BA in education from the University of Kentucky. She has a strong publication, presentation and teaching background in her various positions at UC Clermont where she made tremendous and significant accomplishments in improving the facilities, collections and services of the UC Clermont College Library. Katie also has relevant experience serving children and teens in her previous work in public libraries and as an instructional services librarian at Berea College.

“I am tremendously excited to contribute to the dynamic strategic direction of UC Libraries and to the vibrant CECH community, supporting their diverse student, faculty and program needs,” said Katie.

Welcome, Katie, in your new role as the head of the CECH Library!