Mozart in the Library

Ever wonder what people are playing while they are practicing the keyboard in Langsam and CCM Libraries? Jay Sinnard, manager of the Student Technology Resources Center, did so he asked one student if he could listen in.

michael rollins

Michael Rollins, BioMedical Engineering (Ph.D.) student

 

 

And, because you can’t always be Mozart…

 

A collaboration between UC Libraries and the College-Conservatory of Music (CCM), the keyboards are open to anyone wanting to play on a first come-first served basis, but bring your own headphone as they are required.

Met Opera on Demand & MGG Online – Update

A quick reminder from the CCM Library that we are trialing two exciting new resources – Met Opera on Demand and MGG Online – for a few more weeks! But we heard about difficulties that some of you experienced when trying to access the links, especially from off-campus.

So here are updated links that should work better: Met Opera on Demand and MGG Online (please replace previous links that you may have bookmarked).

We hope this gives everyone a better opportunity to experience these products. Do send feedback any feedback to: Jenny Doctor (jenny.doctor@uc.edu) or Paul Cauthen (paul.cauthen@uc.edu).

Check Out the Latest Issue of Source

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Read Source, the online newsletter, to learn more about the news, events, people and happenings in UC Libraries.

This latest issue of Source includes interviews with Dean Xuemao Wang about creating a Master Plan for library spaces as well as with May Chang about her role in the newly created position of library chief technology officer. Other articles include the announcement of a gift from the John Hauck Foundation for the digitization of Dr. Albert B. Sabin’s lab notebooks, the installation of two new exhibits of World War I illustrated sheet music, a listing of Spring events in UC Libraries, an update on recent staff accomplishments and a donor spotlight of Marjorie Motch. Read these articles and more.

Source is available on the web at http://libapps.libraries.uc.edu/source/ and via e-mail. To receive Source via e-mail, contact melissa.norris@uc.edu to be added to the mailing list.

Inside a Costumer’s Mind: 12 Questions with Cincinnati Shakespeare Company’s Resident Costume Designer, Amanda McGee

By: Sydney Vollmer, ARB Intern

Almost one year ago, Jeremy Dubin, Artistic Associate with at the Cincinnati Shakespeare Company, was kind enough to answer some questions we at the ARB had about the company. After writing our last blog on the costume designs in King Lear, we decided we were curious about what goes on in the mind of a costume designer. So, we went back to the CSC. Resident Costume Designer, Amanda McGee, answered everything we wanted to know. Below is the full copy of the interview with images.  

Amanda McGee

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UCBA RefWorks Workshop

by Lauren Wahman

​​​The UCBA Library and the UCBA Learning & Teaching Center sponsored a RefWorks workshop on Thursday February 9.  Randy Roberts (Langsam Library) brought his roadshow out to UCBA for the first time and we had 12 attendees representing a wide range of disciplines such as Nursing, Business, English, and Biology.  This was a great example of libraries collaborating to help faculty learn more about one of our many resources!  Thanks again Randy!

Roberts RefWorks

Randy Roberts (Langsam Library) introducing the NEW interface for RefWorks

 

Roberts Wahman RefWorks

Randy Roberts (Langsam Library) and Lauren Wahman (UCBA Library) providing help to attendees

King Richard III: A Hunch about his Costume

Sydney Vollmer, Archives & Rare Books Library Intern

For those faithful followers who have not been keeping up with local theater, the Cincinnati Shakespeare Company’s next production will be Richard III, running February 17th through March 11th. Their website (http://www.cincyshakes.com/) says of the show:

Shakespeare’s game of thrones enters its endgame as the history cycle’s final chapter takes the stage. The ruthless, remorseless and relentless Richard Plantagenet has his eyes set on the throne of England, and he makes the happy earth his hell as he carves a bloody swath through all that stands in his way. The History Cycle comes to its thrilling conclusion with the story of England’s most murderous monarch, Richard III. Paired with the production of Henry VI: The Wars of the Roses, Part 2, this theatrical event is not to be missed! Continue reading

Love Your Data Week Day 5 Rescuing Unloved Data

Today’s LYD post is by Amy Koshoffer, Science Informationist based at the Geology Math and Physics Library with editorial support from Dr. Eric J. Tepe, Assistant Professor of Biology and Curator of the Margaret H. Fulford Herbarium.

It has been sometime since I stepped over the threshold of my old lab in the Care/Crawley Building. Many changes occurred in the interim including a move to another floor of the building. There are times I miss the bench research and the data I created in my time as a senior research assistant. One of my favorite techniques was microscopy and particularly Electron Microscopy (EM). I remember the multitude of samples processed, the long wait for samples to be ready to image and then finally all the amazing images we captured. Processing samples for EM imagining is a long and sometimes challenging technique. The samples need to be dehydrated and then infiltrated with a resin to stabilize the structures and prevent destruction from the electron beam during viewing. You might not know if a sample has been ideally preserved until you get to the imaging lab and begin to examine the sample. But what joy when the images look amazing with crisp detail and no water holes. So much work and resources went into the sample preservation and acquiring images.

I wonder what will happen to that effort in the years and decades to come. Are there others who might want to use the physical samples and digital images in their own work? Did I do what was needed to make sure that someone could reuse all the data created? Continue reading

Love Your Data Week Day 4 – Finding the Right Data

Today’s LYD post is by Don P. Jason III, MLIS, MS, Clinical Informationist based at the Donald C. Harrison Health Sciences Library.

Welcome to Day 4 of “Love Your Data Week!” Whether you’re a student analyzing a data set for a school project or a researcher combining data sets to create new insights, finding the right data is essential! This blog post will list a few places you can look to find free, authoritative and unique data sets. The data sets have be broken down into three categories:  US Government Data Sets, International Data Sets and Google Data Sets.

US Government Data Sets

Data.gov http://data.gov – This web site has an eclectic mix of datasets from criminal justice to climate data.  This government site encourages people to use the data to create web and mobile applications and design data visualizations.

US Census Bureau http://www.census.gov/data.html – This web site provides data on the US population and economy.  Utilizing this site’s data has never been easier thanks to new: API’s, data visualizations, mobile apps and interactive web apps.

Healthdata.gov https://www.healthdata.gov/ – This web site includes US healthcare data.  The site is dedicated to making high value health data more accessible to entrepreneurs, researchers and policy makers.

National Climatic Data Center http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/data-access/quick-links#loc-clim – This is the world’s largest archive of weather data. It has a robust collection of environmental, meteorological and climate data sets from the US National Climatic Data Center.

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Love Your Data Week Day 3 – Good data examples

Today’s Love Your Data Week’s post is by Tiffany Grant PhD, Interim Assistant Director for Research and Informatics at the Health Sciences Library (HSL) and Research Informationist.

Data, FAIR Data

If asked to define good data, the definitions would run the gamut, as the interpretation of the term will be specific to the types and formats of data typically collected by the individual. However, simply put, good data meets the standard of being of good quality, and data quality generally refers to the ability of data to serve the use it was intended. In short, data quality hinges on the reliability and application efficiency of data. The combination of good data quality and data documentation ensures accurate interpretation and reproducibility. Beyond documentation, a number of federal mandates dictate that data be shared beyond one’s own lab notebook, and in order to ensure proper interpretation and reproducibility of your data, it must be FAIR.

 

 

 

 

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