Joseph Alsop Papers in ARB – Part 2 – Joe Alsop's Greek Bronze Age Archive at the University of Cincinnati

Below is the second in a series of blogs in which Jack Davis discusses Joseph Alsop and his papers in ARB.  It was originally published on From the Archivist’s Notebook, a blog of Natalia Vogeikoff-Brogan, head of the archives at the American School of Classical Studies at Athens.  

By:  Jack Davis, Carl W. Blegen Professor of Greek Archaeology at the University of Cincinnati 

fromthesilentearthSearching library catalogues and online archival finding aids sometimes produces unexpected consequences. As I wrote in Part I of this two-part post, Joseph Alsop’s principal archive is curated in the Library of Congress. The University of Cincinnati Archives and Rare Book Library, however, contains five boxes of manuscripts of From the Silent Earth and relevant correspondence between Alsop and the eminent scholars Emmett Bennett, Carl Blegen, Maurice Bowra, John Caskey, Sterling Dow, and Leonard Palmer. While writing From the Silent Earth: A Political Columnist Reports on the Greek Bronze Age (1964), Alsop solicited advice from these distinguished Aegean prehistorians and Classical philologists, all of whom were supportive of his efforts. Jack Caskey, for example, replied to an initial letter of inquiry: “I’m particularly interested in absorbing your political analysis. It sounds neither foolish nor pretentious to me in your brief summary.”

In Part I, I explored how it was that one of Washington’s foremost political analysts of the Cold War era (and for two decades a trustee of the American School of Classical Studies in Athens) came to write a book about the Greek Bronze Age. In Part II, I describe the contents of the archive in Cincinnati, discuss its academic significance, and consider what light it sheds on Alsop’s research methods. Continue reading

Checking Out the Neil Armstrong Website

websiteHave you visited the Neil Armstrong Website? The site pays tribute to Armstrong’s professional life from his early career as a test pilot to his monumental first steps on the moon and concluding with his time as a professor and researcher at the University of Cincinnati?

Check out what others are saying about it:

From CHOICE Reviews Online

Anyone curious about the career of the first man to walk on the moon should begin with this site.  The rich content exposes users to highlights as well as little-known but important, interesting aspects of Neil Armstrong’s life.

From Air@Space Smithsonian

The University [of Cincinnati] has a nice online archive commemorating Armstrong’s time on the faculty.  The collection includes some items from the astronaut’s early life, like his pilot’s log book from the Navy, but mostly it covers in pictures and documents his career in academia.

Elliston Poetry Lecture, February 27, 2015, Mary Szybist

The next reading in the Elliston Reading Series will be by poet Mary Szybist.

February 27, 2015 4:00 PM, Elliston Poetry Room, 646 Langsam Library

Mary Szybist is most recently the author of Incarnadine, winner of the 2013 National Book Award for Poetry. She is the recipient of fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Rona Jaffe Foundation, the Witter Bynner Foundation in conjunction with the Library of Congress, and the Rockefeller Foundation’s Bellagio Center. Her work has appeared in such publications as Best American Poetry, The Kenyon Review, Poetry, Ploughshares, and two Pushcart Prize anthologies. Her first book, Granted, won the 2004 GLCA New Writers Award and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. A native of Williamsport, Pennsylvania, she now lives in Portland, Oregon where she teaches at Lewis & Clark College.

Look for recordings of this presentation soon in the digital collection, The Elliston Project: Poetry Readings and Lectures at the University of Cincinnati.

Learn more about Events sponsored by the Elliston Poetry Fund.

Browse and Borrow Books for the National African American Read-In

naariUCBA students, staff and faculty are invited to participate in the 26thannual National African-American Read-In.  The goal of the NAARI is to make the celebration of African American literacy a traditional part of Black History Month activities.  This year, the National African-American Read-In will be observed at UC Blue Ash College on Tuesday, February 24, 2015 from 11:00am – 1:00pm in Walters 100.

During the event, volunteers read aloud a short passage by an African-American author. Information about the national event, a list of recommended readings, and the volunteer registration form can be found on the National African American Read-In Guide at http://guides.libraries.uc.edu/ucba-naari. Be sure to stop by the UCBA Library to browse and borrow suggested titles in the UCBA Library’s periodicals area near the entrance.

We look forward to seeing you there!

UC Libraries to Present Workshop on Research Practices

Workshop Announcement:

COS_EviteUCimage
On March 11 and 12, UC Libraries will sponsor the Center of Open Science for a workshop on reproducible research practices.

This workshop is free for attendees.  There are two opportunities to attend, with same content offered at each session.  Please register by Monday, March 2 at  https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/UCCenterOpenScience

  • Wednesday, March 11, 1:00 – 4:00 pm, East Campus (Health Sciences Library, MSB G005G Electronic Classroom)
  • Thursday, March 12, 1:00 – 4:00 pm, West Campus (Langsam Library 480)

Continue reading

Discovering Your Roots: Langsam Connect Event Feb. 25th

langsamconnectDiscovering Your Roots

Wednesday, February 25th

3 pm @ the Triceracopter, 4th floor Langsam Library.

Have you always wanted to trace your family history? Come learn how to use Ancestry.com, available through UC Libraries, and also enjoy interesting and in-depth dialogue about the link between African History and Black Culture.

Hosts:        Dr. Karen Cudjoe, Instructor of Africana Studies & Nick Wantsala, President of African Student Association

What:        Fun, Soul Food, and Library Finds

When:      Wednesday, February 25th, 3:00 p.m.

Where:    Langsam Library @ the Triceracopter

Who:         UC students

?s                Pamela.bach@uc.edu, (513) 556-1580

Happy Lunar New Year!

Happy Lunar New Year to all members of the UC Community who celebrate! According to Chinese Zodiac, 2015 is the Year of the Sheep/Goat/Ram.

On February 13th Langsam Library hosted a wonderful Lunar New Party. Sounds of traditional Chinese tunes performed by Tsun-Hui Hung, Adjunct Professor of Musicology at CCM, set the tone for the gathering. Dean Xuemao Wang welcomed the guests and talked about the exciting upcoming events and projects at UC Libraries. Picking up on the lunar theme, Head of Archives and Rare Books Kevin Grace talked about moon folklore and New Year customs in the Appalachian region. Probably the most memorable part of the program was the Lion Dance presented by students of the Chinese Language School. Professor Gergana Ivanova introduced the audience to haiku and following the presentation of the artist Frank Satogata, whose art combines calligraphy and abstract impressionism, several members of the audience wrote their own haiku poems and shared them with the public. After enjoying the food the guests participated in multiple activities, including calligraphy, karaoke, origami, and games. Several guests recorded video greetings for family and friends using the props in the STRC green screen room. The event also featured an exhibit of Chinese paper cutting.

The party definitely gave us enough warm memories to cherish during the cold days that followed. Please enjoy glimpses of the party, whether you were part of the celebration or missed it.

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lunar_haiku5

lunar_liondance4

lunar_calligr

lunar_origami2

lunar_fishing

lunar_food

lunar_papercutting+

 

Joseph Alsop Papers rediscovered in ARB – Part I – Joe Alsop Reports on the Greek Bronze Age

Professor Jack Davis of UC’s Classics Department is a regular visitor to the Archives and Rare Books Library.  Recently he has been examining the Joseph Alsop papers, which contain a manuscript copy of Alsop’s book, From the Silent Earth, a Report on the Greek Bronze Age and correspondence about the manuscript.  Below is the first of a series of blogs in which Jack Davis discusses Joseph Alsop and the collection in ARB.  It was originally published on From the Archivist’s Notebook, a blog of Natalia Vogeikoff-Brogan, head of the archives at the American School of Classical Studies at Athens.  

By:  Jack Davis, Carl W. Blegen Professor of Greek Archaeology at the University of Cincinnati 

Several months ago Louis Menand’s New Yorker review (Nov. 10, 2014) of Gregg Herken’s The Georgetown Set: Friends and Rivals in Cold War Washington kindled my interest in Joseph W. Alsop (1910-1989), influential journalist, syndicated newspaper columnist, and trustee (1965-1985) of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens. A bit of archival sleuthing at the University of Cincinnati (see below) led to the discovery that on Saturday, December 14, 1963, Alsop had summoned an A-list of Classical archaeologists and art historians to dine with him and his wife, Susan Mary, in their Georgetown, Washington, D.C., home — a strange flock for this longtime Washington insider to host.

On the cover, Joseph and Stewart Alsop (photo by Henri Cartier-Bresson)

Continue reading

Charging Station Now in Health Sciences Library

A goCharge charging station has been installed in the Health Sciences Library Computer lab opposite the computer lab helpdesk.  The goCharge charging station provides a secure locker where you can charge your cell phones, smart phones and tablets.

  • Choose a locker and connect your device to one of the three appropriate cables for your device.
  • Close the locker and press the ‘C’ button.  After a beep sounds enter a four-digit code and press the button with a lock icon.  A beep code will sound to let you know that the locker secured.
  • To retrieve your device just follow the same procedures: press the ‘C’ button, enter your four-digit code and press the lock button.
  • If you forget your four-digit code, go to the Circulation desk for help.

There is no charge to use the goCharge system…

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