Welcoming the Newest Bearcats to UC Libraries

orientation
Librarian Cheryl Ghosh (right) talks about the resources available in the College of Education, Criminal Justice and Human Services (CECH) Library.

This summer, the Walter C. Langsam Library is a busy place as over 5,000 incoming students participating in UC’s New Student Orientation visit and learn about the spaces, places and people of UC Libraries. While in Langsam, they engage in activities designed to be both engaging and informative about the various research resources and services students can utilize when they begin classes in the fall, including checking out multi media equipment, working in the various group study rooms and quiet study areas, checking out books and asking questions at the Desk@Langsam.

orientation photo
Jay Sinnard, manager of the Student Technology Resources Center, showcases the various media equipment.

 

With the Technology Showcase, students see and learn about the various media equipment available for checkout and use for class projects including cameras, projectors and even games. They learn how to locate library resources in the catalog via the UC Libraries web site and take a walking tour of the fifth floor of the library where they find where books are located in the stacks. A librarian interviewed “Between Two Book Carts” introduces the students to the people available to assist them in the library.

It is a busy hour, but the goal is to make the students comfortable with the library, introduce them to librarians and staff and to be aware of what UC Libraries has to offer. See you in the fall!

Sebastian Karcher to Present as Part of UC Libraries and IT@UC Data and Computational Science Series

sebastian karcherUC Libraries and IT@UC Research & Development and are pleased to announce the Data & Computational Science Series (DCS2) 2018, a speaker series supported by a Universal Provider award from UC’s Office of the Provost for faculty development.

The next speaker in the series is Sebastian Karcher, associate director of the Qualitative Data Repository at Syracuse University. He will give a talk on Annotation for Transparent Inquiry and conduct a workshop on Web scraping using R to build a qualitative dataset on Tuesday, July 24, in the Walter C. Langsam Library room 480 from 11 a.m.-noon and room 475 from 1-3 p.m. The workshop will be followed by a coffee hour from 3-4 p.m. Continue reading Sebastian Karcher to Present as Part of UC Libraries and IT@UC Data and Computational Science Series

The Donald C. Harrison Health Sciences Library Selected to Host Traveling Exhibition about Native Concepts of Health and Illness

Mashpee Wampanoag Indian Powwow, Mashpee, Massachusetts, July 2010. Courtesy National Library of Medicine/Bryant Pegram
Mashpee Wampanoag Indian Powwow, Mashpee, Massachusetts, July 2010. Courtesy National Library of Medicine/Bryant Pegram

The Donald C. Harrison Health Sciences Library has been selected in a competitive application process to host Native Voices: Native Peoples’ Concepts of Health and Illness, a traveling exhibition to U.S. libraries.

Native Voices explores the interconnectedness of wellness, illness and cultural life for Native Americans, Alaska Natives and Native Hawaiians. Stories drawn from both the past and present examine how health for Native People is tied to community, the land and spirit. Through interviews, Native People describe the impact of epidemics, federal legislation, the loss of land and the inhibition of culture on the health of Native individuals and communities today.

As one of 104 grant recipients selected from across the country, the Donald C. Harrison Health Sciences Library will host the traveling exhibition July 23 through Aug. 30, 2018.

The U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM) developed and produced Native Voices: Native Peoples’ Concepts of Health and Illness. The American Library Association (ALA) Public Programs Office, in partnership with NLM, tours the exhibition to America’s libraries. Native Voices: Native Peoples’ Concepts of Health and Illness was displayed at the NLM in Bethesda, Maryland, from 2011 to 2015. To learn more and view content from the exhibition, visit http://www.nlm.nih.gov/nativevoices.

Suzanne L. Singer
Suzanne L. Singer

Related Events

In association with the Native Voices exhibit, related events have been scheduled to explore the topic of Native Peoples’ Concepts of Health and Illness. The first scheduled event is keynote speaker Suzanne L. Singer scheduled for 5-7:30 p.m., Thursday, July 26, in the CARE/Crawley Atrium (Medical Sciences Building, 231 Albert Sabin Way). Throughout August, lectures that cover such topics as “The Contribution of Native Voices to Medicine through Botany,” “Breaking Bread: A Perspective of Fry Bread and Native Health” and “Preventing Tuberculosis while Regulating Indigenous Bodies” have been scheduled in the Stanley J. Lucas, MD, Board Room, E level of the Medical Sciences Building near the Kresge Circle.

A full schedule of events is listed online.

Continue reading The Donald C. Harrison Health Sciences Library Selected to Host Traveling Exhibition about Native Concepts of Health and Illness

Dean’s Corner: Collaborating at Home and Abroad

One of UC Libraries’ greatest strengths is its partnerships and collaborations. On or off campus, at home or abroad, the Libraries are always looking for opportunities to forge new relationships, while engaging in the university’s global agenda. As library dean I am fortunate enough to be involved with many of these relationships from their infancy.

This spring I traveled to China with UC’s Provost Kristi Nelson and Vice Provost for International Affairs Raj Mehta to visit Beijing Jiaotong University and Shandong University. In my role as Special Advisor to the Provost on China Initiatives, I have traveled to China on many occasions with various members of UC’s senior leadership, assisting in UC’s China engagement. More often than not, these trips include tours of university libraries (see the picture on the bottom left corner of Provost Nelson and me at the new Shandong University Qingdao campus library).

Pictures from China:

Continue reading Dean’s Corner: Collaborating at Home and Abroad

Ohio Digital Newspapers & Chronicling America Presentation in ARB on Thursday July 26

Come hear about Ohio’s digital newspaper project and learn how to freely access historic newspapers from around the country.

When:  Thursday July 26 from 11:00am-12:30pm

Where:  Archives and Rare Books Library, Seminar Room 814

Westliche Blatter mastheadDid you know that 90 Ohio newspapers including foreign language papers have been digitized and are now part of the Library of Congress’ free newspaper database Chronicling America?  Learn how to access the over 13 million pages of historic newspapers from 47 states and territories covering 1789-1963 on Chronicling America.  Jenni Salamon, Coordinator for the Ohio Digital Newspaper Program, and Bronwyn Benson, Quality Control Technician, from the Ohio History Connection will demonstrate basic and advanced search strategies and how to work with your results to find information about local, state, national and international events, people, places and culture. They will also provide a brief overview newspaper digitization process and an update on the digitization of Ohio’s foreign language newspapers.

The Colored Citizen mastheadTreasures from the Archives and Rare Books Library collections including items from the German Americana collection that complement the digitized newspapers will be available for viewing before and after the presentation.

Snacks and drinks will be provided.

Read Source to Learn How We’re Making Digital Collections More Widely Available and More UC Libraries’ News

sourceRead Source, the online newsletter, to learn more about the news, events, people and happenings in UC Libraries.

In this edition of Source we highlight some of the University of Cincinnati Libraries’ newest endeavors in digital collections. From the latest version of the university’s digital repository, Scholar@UC, to a new archive space for special collections, to our recent membership in the large-scale collaborative repository HathiTrust, UC Libraries has made great strides in increasing our digital footprint and exploring new ways to enhance our user’s scholarship and the ways they can access and utilize our collections.

In addition, read about two exciting projects UC Libraries is involved in: PBS’s Great American Read and the touring exhibit Native Voices: Native Peoples’ Concepts of Health and Illness.

Read these articles, as well as past issues, on the web at http://libapps.libraries.uc.edu/source/ and via e-mail. To receive Source via e-mail, contact melissa.norris@uc.edu to be added to the mailing list.

Dr. Stanley B. Troup Learning Space Grand Opening June 18

Troupe
Join us Monday, June 18, from 1-2pm in G005G of the Donald C. Harrison Health Sciences Library for the Dr. Stanley B. Troup Learning Space Grand Opening. Librarians and informationists will give demos of the space. They will show how the technology is integrated into the classroom and transforms the way they provide library instruction. All are welcome, so bring a colleague.

In May 2015, Paula Troup made a donation in honor of her late husband, Dr. Stanley B. Troup, former senior vice president and director of the UC Medical Center, to create the learning space that bears his name. For more about the gift and on Dr. Stanley B. Troup, read the Source article online at https://libapps.libraries.uc.edu/source/words-of-wisdom-live-on-in-newly-named-learning-space/.

UC Libraries and IT@UC Announce Next Session of the Data and Computational Science Series

DSC2 series

The University of Cincinnati Libraries and IT@UC Research & Development announce the next in the Data & Computational Science Series (DCS2) 2018, a speaker series supported by a Universal Provider award from UC’s Office of the Provost for faculty development.

DCS2 brings to the University of Cincinnati research community a variety of innovative workshops and distinguished speakers on advanced research data topics including high performance computing, cloud computing, data visualization, research story-mapping, spatial analysis, artificial intelligence and machine learning.  The workshops are free and open to all, but registration is required. Continue reading UC Libraries and IT@UC Announce Next Session of the Data and Computational Science Series

Preservation Week 2018 – Be Our Guest at the Annual Open House April 26th!

It’s spring in Cincinnati, which means two things – the epic weather battle between winter and summer (snow yesterday, 71 degrees Fahrenheit tomorrow) and the annual Preservation Week Lab Open House!

preservation week

This year marks the lab’s 7th year of participation in this national event, an American Libraries Association initiative aimed at raising “awareness of the role libraries and other cultural institutions play in providing ongoing preservation education and information.”  Our event is open to the public – come one, come all!

The Open House will include a behind the scenes tour of the lab, a peek at amazing collection items being preserved for our parent institutions – the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County and the University of Cincinnati Libraries, and of course a new bookmark.

This year our theme highlights the versatility and artistry of the book, from a complex composite object such as a scrapbook to a simple one-page zine.  We’ll also touch on the evolution of the book form, from cuneiform to artist’s book.  As is our tradition, we’ll set up “stations” were visitors can roam, explore, and learn at their own pace.

We are looking forward to see you all on, Thursday, April 26th, 1:30-3:00 pm, 300 Langsam Library.  And yes, there will be cookies!

Music in the Gorno Library Fri. April 20, 2018

Gorno programJoin us Fri. April 20 at 1:30 PM in the Gorno Library for a concert of songs by Henri Duparc performed by members of the Collaborative Piano Seminar in conjunction with the Special Topics Voice students.  View program (pdf). The event is free and open to all.

About the concert:

Henri Duparc  (1848 – 1933) is a unique composer in that his entire international reputation rests upon the sixteen songs for one voice and piano as well as the solitary duet for two voices and piano.  These songs were composed between 1868 and 1884. He chose to orchestrate some of them for symphonic concert performances in the following decade but failed to compose anything new for the remainder of his life.  This phenomenon was caused by a neurasthenic condition that struck in the mid 1880’s and consistently worsened as the decades went by.

He was very strongly influenced by  César Franck’s teaching in his productive decades and it was Franck who encouraged him to make  pilgrimages to Munich and Bayreuth in order to hear the Wagner operas not being presented in Paris.  The unstable  chromatic harmonies of Franck and Wagner are clearly audible in some of the more mature songs. From at least two of the songs, it would appear Duparc was also familiar with the darker influences of Edgar Allan Poe’s world of the macabre.

 When taken as a whole, this limited output contains a surprisingly broad variety of songs  and at least two of which (to poems of Baudelaire) count among the greatest merging of poet and composer in the history of French song.