Upcoming changes in off-campus access links to library resources

User access to library electronic resources is controlled by UC credentials and the Libraries proxy server. To improve management of this, UC Libraries is changing proxy servers at the end of the spring semester. As a result, all URLs containing the library proxy will need to be changed to the new server address. The Libraries has created tools to assist users in changing/creating proxy URLs. For anyone who bookmarks or includes library resource links in communication, course syllabi, canvas, etc., please plan to change library resource links starting in the month of May to the new proxy URL.  The Libraries will maintain the old server through the end of 2021, so access will be continuous for summer semester and ample time is provided for the URLs to be updated.

  • May 3rd: server address changes
  • May 3rd through 2021: change library resource links in course syllabi, canvas, personal bookmarks, etc.
  • January 2022: outdated URLs will no longer work for library resources
  • The proxy tools page will be updated May 3rd to assist with editing URLs

If you have any questions about how to access electronic library resources, please contact a library liaison.

Cincinnati Song Initiative (CSI): Announcing Trial Of New Online Resource!

The UC Libraries are beginning a trial of the Cincinnati Song Initiative (CSI) Digital Resource, to continue to 31 December 2021. CSI is an online resource developed by CCM alum Sam Martin.

Trial feedback: Please send any trial feedback, comments, or suggestions to Dr Jenny Doctor (jenny.doctor@uc.edu).

Trial Link for the CCM/UC community to use: Cincinnati Song Initiative (CSI) trial
If you encounter technical issues linking to CSI, send an email to let us know so we can fix the problem quickly.

CSI overview:
CSI was founded to bring a concentrated and cohesive source of art song to the greater Cincinnati area. Dedicated to providing unique experiences through the power of music and text, each performance creates a sense of relevance and active engagement between performers and audiences. This is achieved not only through song, but also through spoken dialogue by the artists, which provides a context and historical background that connects audiences to the repertoire. Concerts take place at different venues throughout the Queen City in order to connect with its many vibrant communities and explore all it has to offer.

For example, CSI content includes:

  • Concerts featuring singers and pianists of national renown, both staged in Cincinnati and from stages beyond our area.
  • Innovation of art song, commissioning and premiering new works to help lead the genre into the twenty-first century and connect closely with today’s audiences.
  • A rich suite of digital resources, such as educational webinars, live interviews with living composers, and innovative digital performance projects.

I hope you enjoy exploring this resource! We welcome feedback about what you think of its usefulness as a tool to support teaching, research, and performance (jenny.doctor@uc.edu).

Visit the Exhibit “Native Voices: Native People’s Concepts of Health and Illness” on Display Now in the Donald C. Harrison Health Sciences Library

Native Voices ExhibitNative Voices: Native Peoples’ Concepts of Health and Illness, a traveling exhibition to U.S. libraries, is on display now through August 30 on the main level of the Donald C. Harrison Health Sciences Library.

Native Voices explores the interconnectedness of wellness, illness and cultural life for Native Americans, Alaska Natives and Native Hawaiians. Stories drawn from both the past and present examine how health for Native People is tied to community, the land and spirit.

Through interviews that can be listened to via iPads located throughout the display, Native People describe the impact of epidemics, federal legislation, the loss of land and the inhibition of culture on the health of Native individuals and communities today.

 

Related Events

suzanne singerIn association with the Native Voices exhibit, related events have been scheduled to explore the topic of Native Peoples’ Concepts of Health and Illness.

The first scheduled event is keynote speaker Suzanne L. Singer who will speak on Intersections of Energy and Wellness from 5-7:30 p.m., Thursday, July 26, in the CARE/Crawley Atrium (Medical Sciences Building, 231 Albert Sabin Way).

Throughout August, lectures that cover such topics as “The Contribution of Native Voices to Medicine through Botany,” “Breaking Bread: A Perspective of Fry Bread and Native Health” and “Preventing Tuberculosis while Regulating Indigenous Bodies” have been scheduled in the Stanley J. Lucas, MD, Board Room, E level of the Medical Sciences Building near the Kresge Circle.

A full schedule of events is listed online.

 

The U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM) developed and produced Native Voices: Native Peoples’ Concepts of Health and Illness. The American Library Association (ALA) Public Programs Office, in partnership with NLM, tours the exhibition to America’s libraries. Native Voices: Native Peoples’ Concepts of Health and Illness was displayed at the NLM in Bethesda, Maryland, from 2011 to 2015. To learn more and view content from the exhibition, visit http://www.nlm.nih.gov/nativevoices.

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And don’t miss the exhibit “The Kretschmer Collection of Native American Children’s Literature donated by Drs. Richard and Laura Kretschmer” on display on the 4th floor lobby of the Walter C. Langsam Library. The exhibit features children’s books with Native American themes, written and illustrated by Native Americans and donated by Drs. Richard and Laura Kretschmer and housed in the College of Education, Criminal Justice and Human Services Library.

New Langsam Exhibit Features The Lucille M. Schultz Archive of 19th-Century Composition

schult exhibitOn display on the 5th floor lobby of the Walter C. Langsam Library, the exhibit – The Lucille M. Schultz Archive of 19th-Century Composition – celebrates the recent donation to the university by professor emeritus Lucille M. Schultz of an archive of 19th-century textbooks  collected while she researched her award-winning book The Young Composers. To write her book, which analyzes writing curriculum for children and demonstrates its continued relevance today, Lucy visited dozens of archives where she was fascinated by the lively illustrations and unusual writing prompts in the old textbooks. The exhibit features some of these writing prompts along with illustrations from the texts.

Lucy’s archive is available for viewing via the university’s digital repository Scholar@UC.

The creation of the exhibit was a collaboration between the Libraries and Kelly Blewett, a doctoral candidate in rhetoric and composition at UC, along with her colleague and fellow graduate student Ian Golding. It was designed by communications College of Design, Architecture, Art and Planning (DAAP) design co-op student Sam Kane.

Read about Preserving Taft, the Writing of E.B. White and the Digital Scholarship Center in Source.

source vol 16 no2Read Source, the online newsletter, to learn more about the news, events, people and happenings in UC Libraries.

This latest issue of Source includes a feature on the work of the Preservation Lab and their collaboration with the Archives and Rare Books Library on a collection about William Howard Taft. Xuemao Wang, dean and university librarian, talks about how libraries need to adapt for the future. Kevin Grace, university archivist and head of the Archives and Rare Books Library, writes about a collection centered around children’s books author and co-writer of The Elements of Style, E.B. White. A grant from The Andrew Mellon Foundation in support of the Digital Scholarship Center’s research on machine learning and data visualization in multiple disciplines in the humanities and beyond is announced. Dean Wang and Liz Scarpelli, director of the University of Cincinnati Press are interviewed about the progress of the Press one year in. Gino Pasi, archivist and curator for the Henry R. Winkler Center for the History of the Health Professions, writes about a set of historical and important surgery films recently digitized and made available. Other articles announce the Libraries’s Adopt-a-Book program and the 2016/17 Annual Progress Report.

Read these articles, as well as past issues, on the web at http://libapps.libraries.uc.edu/source/ and via e-mail. To receive Source via e-mail, contact melissa.norris@uc.edu to be added to the mailing list.

The World’s Finest Cinema Brought to You by Your Library & Kanopy

kanopy

We are pleased to announce that the University of Cincinnati Libraries has recently introduced a new online video streaming service, Kanopy

With over 26,000 films and more added monthly, Kanopy includes thousands of award-winning documentaries, training films, and indie films. The database includes films from many of the leading producers, including the Criterion Collection, PBS, HBO California Newsreel, BBC, Kino Lorber, New Day Films, The Great Courses, First Run Features, The Video Project, and hundreds more.

Kanopy has an incredible range of films available: from PBS Shakespeare Uncovered Collection, through Food Choices to Art & Copy – viewers can filter subject searches by most popular,  subject, supplier, filmmaker and more.

Kanopy’s streaming interface makes it easy to watch, share, discuss and engage with films across campus. Instructors: it’s easy to use Kanopy in your coursework. You can share films, create clips or teaching playlists, and embed them into Blackboard. See the Kanopy homepage for more information or contact library staff for help.

 

New Exhibit Uncovers Black History through Arts & Education


On display on the 5th floor of Langsam Library, the exhibit “Uncovering Black History through Arts & Education” features prominent black writers, poets, educators and musicians. Featured in the exhibit are such notables as Rita Dove, Phillis Wheatley, Derrick Bell, Katherine Johnson, Muddy Waters and Tammi Terrell among others. A bibliography of related resources found in UC Libraries is located at the exhibit and online.

The “Uncovering Black History through Arts and Education” exhibit was curated by Meshia Anderson, acquisitions specialist in UC Libraries, and designed by Jessica Burhans, spring semester communications co-op design student from the College of Design, Architecture, Art and Planning.

The exhibit was produced in coordination with an event scheduled for Wednesday, Feb. 8, 2017, 2:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m., fourth floor Langsam Library in the Digital Commons Space. At the event, free and open to all, Littisha Bates, associate professor of sociology in the College of Arts and Sciences, will speak about sociology of black families. Other activities will include poetry, soulful food bites and interactive trivia based on the exhibit. Brandon Hawkins of Soul Palette, a company that creates paint party experiences, will help everyone tap into their inner artistry.

Looking for Historical Business Data?

In June 2014, The DAAP Library invested in Historical Business Data, Infogroup’s geo-referenced database of historic company records. Data comprises company name, mailing address, SIC and NAICS codes, employee size, sales volume, latitude/longitude and many more variables about each company.

Dr. Xinhao Wang, professor in the School of Planning in the College of Design, Architecture, Art and Planning (DAAP), and Jennifer Krivickas, head of the Robert A. Deshon and Karl J. Schlachter Library for Design, Architecture, Art & Planning, are exploring the possibility of working with the UC’s Technology Commercialization Accelerator (an internal unit that provides seed funding, commercialization expertise and business connections to launch potentially high-impact entrepreneurial initiatives) to develop a proprietary discovery layer that would help researchers search, analyze and visualize data. Stay tuned for more.

Library Research Guides: Digital Literacy

Libraries provide hundreds of online research guides that point you to tools for all of your research and information handling needs – from finding information to citing sources and publishing the information you created. Some guides are specific to a software product, course or discipline, while others cover a broad range of resources.

This month’s featured guide, Digital Literacy, is a collection of links and tips on finding and evaluating information in digital environments. There is information on how to use online technologies to stay current, organize your citations, files and data, and how to create and publish digital content, as well as how to network and collaborate effectively, protect your online identity, and how to be an ethical and responsible digital citizen.

All these aspects of digital literacy apply to many facets of daily life, but the primary goal of the Research Guide is to equip students with the tools and techniques that would enhance their academic careers and future employment.

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Image source: Digital Literacy Forum.