Fall 2021 UCBA Library Research Workshops

by Lauren Wahman

The UCBA Library is offering two Research Workshops for fall 2021 – Finding Your Research Sources and Evaluating Your Research Sources. These are one hour sessions offered online and in person and registration is required. The sessions are open to all UCBA students. Refer to the 2021 UCBA Library Workshops flyer for schedule and registration information.  

Finding Your Research Sources
Need to find sources for your research assignment? Finding information can be frustrating and overwhelming, but the UCBA Library is here to help. Join librarians to discuss where to search, get some strategies for building better searches, and ask questions. 

Evaluating Your Research Sources
Not sure if the sources you’ve found are high quality? Deciding if info is trustworthy and credible can be challenging, but the UCBA Library is here to help. Join librarians to discuss source evaluation, get strategies you can use for your research, and ask questions.  

Library Display: Celebrate Diversity!

By Lauren Wahman

This display showcases a selection of books (print/electronic) and streaming media available through the UC Blue Ash Library and includes a range of topics and authors. The display will be available until January 29, 2021 with physical items available to request via Click and Collect. Be sure to visit the Celebrate Diversity online display. 

 book display atop bookshelves

Resources for Faculty Research

by Lauren Wahman

scrabble tiles spell out the word research

Photo Credit: Pixabay

Whether it’s discipline-specific, creative, or a classroom-based research project, we’re getting you started with a newly redesigned Faculty Research Guide. To help with specific research needs, schedule an online research consultation with your department’s library faculty liaison. Or, find research-focused online workshops through the UC Libraries Calendar and the Faculty Enrichment Center’s Program Calendar.  Finally, watch for a special 4th Annual Faculty Research Lightning Talks blog post in the spring that will showcase faculty scholarship. 

Celebrating Women’s History Month

women's history month display at UCBA Library

The UCBA Library is celebrating Women’s History Month and the amazing global contributions of women!  This year’s displays (located in Reference area) showcase books covering a wide range of topics in the areas of journalism, science, art, business, politics, law, activism, education, technology, as well as social issues.  There’s also a selection of recent fiction titles by women writers.

Stop by and borrow a book from the displays during the month of March! You can also browse the list of books on the Library Displays at UCBA online guide.

Additional Resources for Women’s History Month:

 

by Lauren Wahman

March Book of the Month

Your UBCA Library’s Book of the Month  for March 2020 

All the Light We Cannot See 

By Anthony Doerr 

All the Light We Cannot See book cover

A stunningly ambitious and beautiful novel about a blind French girl and a German boy whose paths collide in occupied France as both try to survive the devastation of World War II. Marie Laure lives with her father in Paris within walking distance of the Museum of Natural History where he works as the master of the locks (there are thousands of locks in the museum). When she is six, she goes blind, and her father builds her a model of their neighborhood, every house, every manhole, so she can memorize it with her fingers and navigate the real streets with her feet and cane. When the Germans occupy Paris, father and daughter flee to Saint-Malo on the Brittany coast, where Marie-Laure’s agoraphobic great uncle lives in a tall, narrow house by the sea wall. In another world in Germany, an orphan boy, Werner, grows up with his younger sister, Jutta, both enchanted by a crude radio Werner finds. He becomes a master at building and fixing radios, a talent that wins him a place at an elite and brutal military academy and, ultimately, makes him a highly specialized tracker of the Resistance. Werner travels through the heart of Hitler Youth to the far-flung outskirts of Russia, and finally into Saint-Malo, where his path converges with Marie-Laure. Doerr’s gorgeous combination of soaring imagination with observation is electric. Deftly interweaving the lives of Marie-Laure and Werner, Doerr illuminates the ways, against all odds, people try to be good to one another. 

Is it checked out?  Don’t worrywe’ve got you covered: 

 The Secrets We Keep (PS3616.R463 S43 2019)At the height of the Cold War, two secretaries are pulled out of the typing pool at the CIA and given the assignment of a lifetime. Their mission: to smuggle Doctor Zhivago out of the USSR, where no one dare publish it, and help Pasternak’s magnum opus make its way into print around the world. Glamorous and sophisticated Sally Forrester is a seasoned spy who has honed her gift for deceit all over the world — using her magnetism and charm to pry secrets out of powerful men. Irina is a complete novice, but under Sally’s tutelage quickly learns how to blend in, make drops, and invisibly ferry classified documents. Their story is intertwined with that of the decades-long affair between Pasternak and his mistress and muse, Olga Ivinskaya, who was sent to the Gulag and inspired Zhivago’s heroine, Lara 

320 rue St Jacques : the Diary of Madeleine Blaess (ebook)In November 1939 Madeleine Blaess, a French-born, British-raised student, set off for Paris to study for a doctorate in Medieval French literature at the Sorbonne. In June 1940, the German invasion cut off her escape route to the ports, preventing her return to Britain. She was forced to remain in France for the duration of the Occupation and in October 1940 began to write a diary. Intended initially as a replacement letter to her parents in York, she wrote it in French and barely missed an entry for almost four years.  

Madeleine’s diary is unique as she wrote it to record as much as she could about everyday life, people and events so she could use these written traces to rekindle memories later for the family from whom she had been parted. Many diaries of that era focus on the political situation. Madeleine’s diary does reflect and engage with military and political events. It also provides an unprecedented day-by-day account of the struggle to manage material deprivation, physical hardship, mental exhaustion and depression during the Occupation. The diary is also a record of Madeleine’s determination to achieve her ambition to become a university academic at a time when there was little encouragement for women to prioritise education and career over marriage and motherhood. Her diary is edited and translated here for the first time. 

The Last Metro (streaming film): Gérard Depardieu and Catherine Deneuve star as members of a French theater company living under the German occupation during World War II in François Truffaut’s gripping, humanist character study. Against all odds, a Jewish theater manager in hiding; a leading man who’s in the Resistance; increasingly restrictive Nazi oversight, the troupe believes the show must go on. Equal parts romance, historical tragedy, and even comedy, The last metro (Le dernier métro) is Truffaut’s ultimate tribute to art overcoming adversity. 

 

by Christian Boyles

3rd Annual Faculty Research Lightning Talks

Lightning Talk text graphic

Tuesday March 10, 2020 from 3:00-4:30 pm
Learning & Teaching Center Room (Muntz 117) 

These short presentations showcase faculty research and share different aspects of the research process. Refreshments will be provided.   

Carla Cesare
Networks of Design: Women at Work 

David Freeman
Geometry From Symmetry

Christopher Gulgas
A Student Discovery Involving a Chemical that Changes Color Leads to a New Organic Laboratory Experiment

Linda Wunderley
The Real Truth About What Determines Our Professional Performance 

 

by Lauren Wahman

On Display: Black History Month and National African American Read In Titles

Black history month display

 

The National African American Read-In display represents a selection of “Must Read” books by African American authors available at UC Blue Ash Library. Books will be on display until February 28, 2020. Borrow a book and volunteer to read an excerpt from a book by an African American Author by visiting ucblueash.edu/readin. Rachelle Lawson, UC staff alumna and author of Girl, Get Yo’ Life is the special guest for this year’s National African American Read In on February 13, 2020 at 11:00 am in the Muntz Auditorium Lobby.

 

 

February Book of the Month

Your UBCA Library’s Book of the Month for February 2020

 

Native Son by Richard Wright

Native Son bookcover

Right from the start, Bigger Thomas had been headed for jail. It could have been for assault or petty larceny; by chance, it was for murder and rape. Native Son tells the story of this young black man caught in a downward spiral after he kills a young white woman in a brief moment of panic.

Set in Chicago in the 1930s, Richard Wright’s powerful novel is an unsparing reflection on the poverty and feelings of hopelessness experienced by people in inner cities across the country and of what it means to be black in America.

 

Is it checked out?  Don’t worrywe’ve got you covered:

Invisible Man (PS3555.L625 I5 1995): A first novel by an unknown writer, it remained on the bestseller list for sixteen weeks, won the National Book Award for fiction, and established Ralph Ellison as one of the key writers of the century. The nameless narrator of the novel describes growing up in a black community in the South, attending a Negro college from which he is expelled, moving to New York and becoming the chief spokesman of the Harlem branch of “the Brotherhood”, and retreating amid violence and confusion to the basement lair of the Invisible Man he imagines himself to be.

Lighting the Fires of Freedom: African American Women in the Civil Rights Movement by Janet Dewart Bell (E185.61 .B375 2018): Lighting the Fires of Freedom Janet Dewart Bell shines a light on women’s all-too-often overlooked achievements in the Movement. Through wide-ranging conversations with nine women, several now in their nineties with decades of untold stories, we hear what ignited and fueled their activism, as Bell vividly captures their inspiring voices. Lighting the Fires of Freedom offers these deeply personal and intimate accounts of extraordinary struggles for justice that resulted in profound social change, stories that are vital and relevant today.

A vital document for understanding the Civil Rights Movement, Lighting the Fires of Freedom is an enduring testament to the vitality of women’s leadership during one of the most dramatic periods of American history.

Richard Wright: Native Son, Actor, Activist (streaming film): Richard Wright was an African-American author of novels, short stories and non-fiction that dealt with powerful themes and controversial topics. Much of his works concerned racial themes that helped redefine discussions of race relations in America in the mid-20th century. Born on a plantation in Mississippi, Wright was a descendent of the first slaves who arrived in Jamestown Massachusetts. This program follows his arduous path from sharecropper to literary giant. Through authors like H.L. Menken, Sinclair Lewis, Theodore Dreiser, he discovered that literature could be used as a catalyst for social change. In 1937 Wright moved to New York and his work began to garner national attention for it’s political and social commentary. Much of Wright’s writing focused on the African American community and experience; his novel Native Son won him a Guggenheim Fellowship and was adapted to the Broadway stage with Orson Welles directing in 1941.

 

by Christian Boyles 

October Book of the Month

No Visible Bruises bookcover

We call it domestic violence. We call it private violence. Sometimes we call it intimate terrorism. But whatever we call it, we generally do not believe it has anything at all to do with us, despite the World Health Organization deeming it a “global epidemic.” In America, domestic violence accounts for 15 percent of all violent crime, and yet it remains locked in silence, even as its tendrils reach unseen into so many of our most pressing national issues, from our economy to our education system, from mass shootings to mass incarceration to #MeToo. We still have not taken the true measure of this problem.

In No Visible Bruises, journalist Rachel Louise Snyder gives context for what we don’t know we’re seeing. She frames this urgent and immersive account of the scale of domestic violence in our country around key stories that explode the common myths—that if things were bad enough, victims would just leave; that a violent person cannot become nonviolent; that shelter is an adequate response; and most insidiously that violence inside the home is a private matter, sealed from the public sphere and disconnected from other forms of violence. Through the stories of victims, perpetrators, law enforcement, and reform movements from across the country, Snyder explores the real roots of private violence, its far-reaching consequences for society, and what it will take to truly address it.

Is it checked out?

No worries, we have more titles on the subject.

Framing the Victim : Domestic Violence, Media, and Social Problems – HN59.2 .B468 2004

Violent Partners : a Breakthrough Plan for Ending the Cycle of Abuse – HV6626.2 .M58 2008

Teen Dating Violence : How Peers Affect Risk & Protective Factors – ebook

 By Christian Boyles

UCBA Faculty Share Research at 2nd Lightning Talks

by Lauren Wahman

The UCBA Library hosted its 2nd Faculty Research Lightning Talks on Thursday March 28.  This year’s event showcased a variety of research projects via short, 15 minute presentations.  UCBA faculty and staff enjoyed light refreshments, had the opportunity to learn about research outside of their disciplines, and ask thoughtful questions during the Q&A’s.

Faculty Lighting Talk presenters

(L-R) Ruth Benander, Ornaith O’Dowd, Amy Miller, Patrick Owen

Lighting Talk Presentations

Ruth Benander | Professor | English & Communication
Barriers and Supports: Demographic Patterns and Student Perceptions in Comp and Comm Courses

Ornaith O’Dowd | Assistant Professor | History, Philosophy & Political Science
The Ethics of Microaggressions

Amy Miller & Patrick Owen | Associate Professors | Biology
Blending Ecological, Microbiological, and Molecular Techniques to Create Multifaceted Undergraduate Research Projects