What Do Martin Luther, a Hidden Paleontologist and German-Americans Have in Common? They are All in the Latest Source.

sourceRead Source, the online newsletter, to learn more about the news, events, people and happenings in UC Libraries.

This latest issue of Source includes an article from Xuemao Wang, dean and university librarian, about UC Libraries core beliefs and their role on how we achieve our mission “to empower discovery, stimulate learning and inspire the creation of knowledge by connecting students, faculty, researchers and scholars to dynamic data, information and resources.” Kevin Grace, university archivist and head of the Archives and Rare Books Library, writes about a hidden bust of a famous 20th-century paleontologist and philosopher. Two important gifts are announced in this issues of Source – the first, an endowment from the Marge and Charles J. Schott Foundation for the German-Americana Collection; the second, a legacy gift from Sandra and Robert Cohan to benefit musical collections in the Albino Gorno Memorial Library. Exhibits highlighting the Archives and Rare Books Library’s Shakespeare Collection, the 500th anniversary of the Reformation and a book display for Hispanic Heritage Month are also featured in this issue of Source. In addition, a collaboration between the College of Medicine and the Donald C. Harrison Health Sciences Library to create a grant program to partner medical faculty with library informationists is announced.

Read these articles, as well as past issues, on the web at http://libapps.libraries.uc.edu/source/ and via e-mail. To receive Source via e-mail, contact melissa.norris@uc.edu to be added to the mailing list.

New and Returning Library Student Assistants Are Ready To Serve

The UCBA Library is pleased to welcome five new student assistants for the 2017-2018 school year. They are joined by five returning student assistants. Together, they assist students, staff and faculty by answering general questions about the library and its policies, checking materials in and out, facilitating study room usage, and providing instruction on how to use the various tools and resouces available in the library.

Group of library student assistants standing at the information desk.
UCBA Library Student Assistants

Continue reading New and Returning Library Student Assistants Are Ready To Serve

Fun Facts: What is your favorite bookstore (online or in-person)?

And the Winners Are…Edible Books 2017

birth of photography
Best Overall – Capturing the List: The Birth of Photography by Ashleigh Schieszer

The University of Cincinnati Libraries celebrated the International Edible Books Festival for the 15th year on April 4, 2017.

Twenty-one students, librarians, and staff submitted entries that ranged from children’s books to literary classics to popular fiction and were made of cakes, cookies, candy, and even beans. Each entry was judged and awarded a bookmark. The winners are:

  • Most Photogenic – Ten Little Ladybugs by Melissa Cox Norris
  • Most Original – City of Bones by Michelle Burhans
  • Most Humorous – How to Eat Fried Worms by Tate Snyder
  • Most Whimsical – One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish by Sami Scheidler
  • Most Creative – The Manual of Detection by Jenny Mackiewicz
  • Most Beautiful – Uncle Monarch and the Day of the Dead by Elaine Ignatius
  • Most Magical – Charlotte’s Web by Michelle Wagner
  • Most Honorable – Lord of the Rings: One Ring to Rule Them All by Nicole Beletis
  • Most Adorable – Green Eggs and Ham by Sara Mihaly
  • Most Clever – The Creature from the Black Legume by Linda Newman
  • Most Gruesome – Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them by Jack Norris
  • Most Deadly – Girl on the Train by Holly Prochaska
  • Most Surprising – Twisted by Olga Hart
  • Most Mysterious – Heart of Darkness by Ben Kline
  • Most Scandalous – Fifty Shades of Grey by Jessica Burhans
  • Most Checked Out – Pizza for Breakfast by Lorna and Jerry Newman
  • Most Fun – Me Cookie by Sam Norris
  • Best Overall – Capturing the Light: The Birth of Photography by Ashleigh Schieszer
  • Best Student Entry – I Spy by Tate Snyder
Attendees enjoying the treats at Edible Books

Congratulations to all the edible books creators. View the entries and the winners on the UC Libraries Facebook page. See you next year for Edible Books 2018!

 

Mozart in the Library: Act II

Ever wonder what people are playing while they are practicing the keyboard in Langsam and CCM Libraries? Jay Sinnard, manager of the Student Technology Resources Center, did so he asked one student if he could listen in.

Eliza Walsh
Eliza Walsh, Spanish major.

 

Can you identify what she’s playing? Bach? Beethoven?

A collaboration between UC Libraries and the College-Conservatory of Music (CCM), the keyboards are open to anyone wanting to play on a first come-first served basis, but bring your own headphone as they are required.

Inside a Costumer’s Mind: 12 Questions with Cincinnati Shakespeare Company’s Resident Costume Designer, Amanda McGee

By: Sydney Vollmer, ARB Intern

Almost one year ago, Jeremy Dubin, Artistic Associate with at the Cincinnati Shakespeare Company, was kind enough to answer some questions we at the ARB had about the company. After writing our last blog on the costume designs in King Lear, we decided we were curious about what goes on in the mind of a costume designer. So, we went back to the CSC. Resident Costume Designer, Amanda McGee, answered everything we wanted to know. Below is the full copy of the interview with images.  

Amanda McGee

Continue reading Inside a Costumer’s Mind: 12 Questions with Cincinnati Shakespeare Company’s Resident Costume Designer, Amanda McGee

BAE: Bureau of American Ethnology (not the Danish word for “poop” or an abbreviation of “babe”)

By: Colleen O’Brien, ARB Student Assistant

The acronym BAE does not refer to a common slang term amongst young folks or even to the Danish word for “poop.” Rather, in this instance it is a term which means Bureau of American Ethnology.

How did the Bureau of American Ethnology come to be and why is it important?

In 1879, as the discipline of anthropology was taking hold in universities across America, Congress established an agency called the Bureau of Ethnology.  There is some controversy over the exact purpose for which this department was founded, but one explanation is that the Department of the Interior needed to transfer archives and other materials to the Smithsonian Institution because the two entities were set to merge shortly thereafter.  Thus Congress decided to create a department to ease this change. The second reason, on the other hand, states the Bureau of Ethnology was established as a purely research division of the Smithsonian. Regardless, John Wesley Powell, the Bureau’s key founder, believed it should be used to promote anthropological research in the Americas.   In fact, in 1897, the Bureau of Ethnology changed its name to Bureau of American Ethnology in order to limit geographic interests. Continue reading BAE: Bureau of American Ethnology (not the Danish word for “poop” or an abbreviation of “babe”)

UCBA Fun Facts: Favorite App or Website