Environmental Records and Regulation

By:  Eira Tansey

Burning Barge on the Ohio River
Strode, William, “Burning Barge on the Ohio River”, 1972, Environmental Protection Agency: DOCUMERICA. Image source: https://catalog.archives.gov/id/543983

The relationship between local, state, and federal environmental protection has always been complicated – both by accident and by design. When the earliest environmental protections began, they typically started at the local and state levels, often following some kind of environmental disaster – and thus, environmental protections developed unevenly. By the time, the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was created in 1970, the decentralization of environmental policy was deliberately embedded in the original organization of the agency: much of EPA’s enforcement and regulatory duties are delegated to state environmental agencies.

Water issues have been roiling the Midwest, with significant attention paid to the Flint lead crisis and the construction of the Dakota Access pipeline. Ohio’s water issues may not be in the headlines as much, but the risks are worth paying attention to. Ohio is often described as a “water-rich” state with Lake Erie to the north, and the Ohio River to the south. Although we may be water-rich, this water is often quite contaminated. The Ohio River is consistently ranked as the most polluted river in the United States, and UC researchers have conducted studies of pollutants from Ohio River-sourced drinking water supplies connected with past manufacture of Teflon. Both Lake Erie and the Ohio River routinely experience harmful algae blooms, which are often connected to runoff from agricultural activities – and much harder to regulate. In addition, Cincinnati is under a federal consent decree due to the overflow from infrastructure deficiencies with the local sewer system.  Continue reading Environmental Records and Regulation

What Do Martin Luther, a Hidden Paleontologist and German-Americans Have in Common? They are All in the Latest Source.

sourceRead Source, the online newsletter, to learn more about the news, events, people and happenings in UC Libraries.

This latest issue of Source includes an article from Xuemao Wang, dean and university librarian, about UC Libraries core beliefs and their role on how we achieve our mission “to empower discovery, stimulate learning and inspire the creation of knowledge by connecting students, faculty, researchers and scholars to dynamic data, information and resources.” Kevin Grace, university archivist and head of the Archives and Rare Books Library, writes about a hidden bust of a famous 20th-century paleontologist and philosopher. Two important gifts are announced in this issues of Source – the first, an endowment from the Marge and Charles J. Schott Foundation for the German-Americana Collection; the second, a legacy gift from Sandra and Robert Cohan to benefit musical collections in the Albino Gorno Memorial Library. Exhibits highlighting the Archives and Rare Books Library’s Shakespeare Collection, the 500th anniversary of the Reformation and a book display for Hispanic Heritage Month are also featured in this issue of Source. In addition, a collaboration between the College of Medicine and the Donald C. Harrison Health Sciences Library to create a grant program to partner medical faculty with library informationists is announced.

Read these articles, as well as past issues, on the web at http://libapps.libraries.uc.edu/source/ and via e-mail. To receive Source via e-mail, contact melissa.norris@uc.edu to be added to the mailing list.

An Environmental Legacy

By:  Eira Tansey

Bob MarshallOver the last couple years, I’ve been exploring the relationship between record keeping, archives, and environmental policy. Right now, I’m shifting my research gears towards the role of recordkeeping practices in the formulation and enforcement of environmental policy.

To understand how we’ve arrived at today’s environmental problems and policies, it’s helpful to go back to the past and look at one of the most influential periods of federal action on natural resource protection. During Roosevelt’s New Deal, major environmental protection projects were undertaken, as well as the introduction of a major federal regulatory state. The Civilian Conservation Corps employed thousands of young men to build trails and buildings still in use today, as well as undertaking environmental restoration projects such as reforestation. While most of today’s major federal environmental laws have their roots in the 1970s, the legal foundation for federal action to be taken on issues that no state can resolve on its own can be traced back to many New Deal-era regulations. Continue reading An Environmental Legacy

Shakespeare, Beethoven, Bearcats and More – All in Latest Issue of Source

sourceRead Source, the online newsletter, to learn more about the news, events, people and happenings in UC Libraries.

This latest issue of Source includes an article with Xuemao Wang, dean and university librarian, about how UC Libraries is utilizing Organizational Development to help bring about transformational change. Kevin Grace, university archivist and head of the Archives and Rare Books Library writes about the Enoch Carson Shakespeare Collection and how it will be a part of autumn 2017 Shakespeare celebrations in Cincinnati. Another great reading collection, the Cohen Enrichment Collection, is also featured in this issue.

Other articles in Source include an update on two UC Libraries Strategic Plan initiatives – eLearning and Digital Literacy and the Digital Scholarship Center, a recap of the most recent annual Cecil Striker Lecture and the addition of Beethoven’s “Life Mask” in the Albino Gorno Memorial (CCM) Library. Read these articles and more.

Source is available on the web at http://libapps.libraries.uc.edu/source/ and via e-mail. To receive Source via e-mail, contact melissa.norris@uc.edu to be added to the mailing list.

Two Librarians Recognized for Excellence

Each year, The Office of the Provost and the Office of Research collaborate to present the Dean’s Award for Faculty Excellence, which recognizes faculty members who represent excellence in all its forms. Each Dean nominates faculty from their respective units whom they deem worthy of this honor. This year, Dean Xuemao Wang recognized the work of Elna Saxton, head of Content Services in the Walter C. Langsam Library, and Tiffany Grant, interim assistant director for research and informatics at the Donald C. Harrison Health Sciences Library. Below is more about their awards. Congratulations, Elna and Tiffany!

elna saxton
(l to r) Dr. Patrick A. Limbach, VP for Research; Elna Saxton; and Peter E. Landgren, Interim Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost

Excellence Award for Faculty-to-Faculty Research Mentoring 2016-2017 – Elna Saxton

Elna has a long history of mentoring faculty members who work as part of her team.  She encourages them to develop their positions and skill sets and provides encouragement and other support to them.  Elna’s support of faculty in her unit is unconditional, even if that means they need to leave her team to move on to other career objectives within University of Cincinnati Libraries or elsewhere.

“Receiving this award is an honor and reflects on the many successful colleagues that I’ve had the good fortune to work with.  It is very rewarding to work with new faculty and engage with their professional and career development,” said Elna.

Tiffany Grant
(l to r) Dr. Patrick A. Limbach, VP for Research; Tiffany Grant; and Peter E. Landgren, Interim Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost

Award for Faculty Excellence 2016-2017 – Tiffany Grant

Tiffany has served as co-PI on the NIH Informationist Supplement grant “The Relationship Between Vortices, Acoustics, and Vibration in Vocal Fold Asymmetries”, working collaboratively with Dr. Khosla and his team.  Dr. Grant also coordinated the writing of and now implementation of the Faculty Development Grant UC Libraries received this year for the pilot of Electronic Lab Notebooks at the University of Cincinnati.  Last fall, Dr. Grant also invited the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) to come to the University for a series of workshops for UC faculty and staff.

“I am profoundly grateful to have been considered for such an honor. I truly enjoy the work that I do and those that I work with. My work in the Libraries has been tremendously rewarding, and I’m thankful for the continued support of my Health Sciences Library and University of Cincinnati colleagues. Any “excellence” that I may have achieved has largely been due to your example and support,” said Tiffany.

Digital Archivist Eira Tansey Named an Archives Leadership Institute Cohort

Eira Tansey
Eira Tansey

Eira Tansey, digital archivist and records manager in the Archives and Rare Books Library, has been selected as an ALI17 cohort member. The Archives Leadership Institute (ALI) is a program funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC), a statutory body affiliated with the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), and is being hosted at Berea College for the years 2016-18. ALI will provide advanced training for 25 archival leaders each year, giving them the knowledge and tools to transform the profession in practice, theory and attitude.

“The Archives Leadership Institute is a well-regarded program in the American archives profession that brings together archivists of diverse backgrounds and work experiences to learn leadership skills together at a week-long institute every summer,” said Eira. “All ALI participants commit to working on a practicum at their home institution, and I have committed to working on increasing documentation of student life within University Archives at the Archives and Rare Books Library.”

Eira joins an elite group attending ALI as only 25 people are accepted each year. More about the Archives Leadership Institute is available on its website.

Welcome, Rebecka Lindau, Head of the Classics Library

Classics Library Reading Room
Classics Library Reading Room

We are pleased to announce that Dr. Rebecka Lindau started March 1 as the Head of the John Miller Burnam Classical Library.

Rebecka comes to UC Libraries from the Lorenzo de Medici Institute and the Center for Ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern Studies (Marist College Branch Campus) where she has been a Lecturer in Classical Studies since the Fall of 2015.  Prior to that she worked at the American Academy in Rome Library. From 2011 to 2013 she was responsible for the digital development of that library and its web design and maintenance. From 2007 to 2011, she was the Drue Heiz Librarian, responsible for the staff, collections (including rare books and manuscripts), selection, preservation, access, circulation, technical services, research consultation, digitization, web design, guides and tutorials. From 2001 to 2007, Rebecka was a subject specialist  for Classics, Hellenic Studies, Linguistics and German at Princeton University and prior to that, from 1997 to 2001 she was subject specialist for Classics, Hellenic Studies and Philosophy at New York University. Continue reading Welcome, Rebecka Lindau, Head of the Classics Library

Kevin Grace Receives Dean’s Award for Faculty Excellence

kevin grace
Kevin Grace, University Archivist and Head of the Archives and Rare Books, with Little William Shakespeare.

Dean and University Librarian Xuemao Wang has selected Kevin Grace, University Archivist and Head of the Archives and Rare Books Library, as the 2015-2016 recipient of the Dean’s Award for Faculty Excellence.

The newly created award from UC’s Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost Beverly Davenport and Vice President for Research Patrick Limbach is intended to recognize outstanding faculty members in each college who represent excellence in all its forms. These faculty development awards are meant to recognize their contributions to their respective colleges and to UC, as well as support their professional efforts. Each recipient will receive $2,000 in discretionary funds to be used to support their teaching or research. Continue reading Kevin Grace Receives Dean’s Award for Faculty Excellence

UCBA Fun Facts: 2016 Reading Goals

Question: Do you have any reading goals for the new year?

Heather

Heather Maloney, Library Director: To read more – more specifically to finish more books! The stack on nightstand is embarrassing:-)

 

Michelle Michelle McKinney, Reference/Web Services Librarian: I’m taking up the Book Riot 2015 Read Harder Challenge found at: http://bookriot.com/2014/12/15/book-riot-2015-read-harder-challenge/

 

KellieKellie Tilton, Instructional Technologies Librarian: Stretch Goal: 150 books; Realistic Goal: 100 books

 

 

LaurenLauren Wahman, Instruction LibrarianAh, yes.  I’m going to make another attempt at noting what books I read throughout the year.  I sometimes pick up a book only to find that I’ve already read it!

 

RachelRachel Lewis, Technical Services Manager: My goal is just to “read”.  

 

 

julierobinsonJulie Robinson, Library Operations Manager: Hmmm, more time for reading!

 

 

pamadler Pam Adler, Public Services Assistant: No!  No goals, no pressure when it comes to reading for pleasure.

 

 

 

UC Employees Featured in UC Magazine

UC Libraries is proud to be a part of the Provost’s Strategic Hiring Opportunity and Dual Career Assistance programs. In a recent article in UC Magazine, library employees Bill McMillin, Tiffany Grant, Don Jason, Hong Cheng and Robert Freeman are included in a feature of new employees that “have joined UC with support from Provost Office funds dedicated to recruit the best and brightest in their fields as well as to attract and support faculty who have partners who can bring their own academic expertise to campus.” You can read all about it online in UC Magazine.