Another Successful National Library Week in the books for UCBA Library

The UCBA Library enjoys celebrating National Library Week with our students, staff and faculty and this year was no different! Visitors had the chance to participate in a number of activities such as “Guess How Many Bookworms” are in a jar, Book Drive for local non-profit Adopt a Book, submitting Book Recommendations and Wake Up And Read Pajama Day.

Survival Basket Winner
                                                     Madaline Bowman wins the Exam Week Survival Basket
Bookworm Winner Rebecca Dabb
   Rebecca Dabb won the jar of gummy Bookworms by guessing 226 bookworks (there were 225)

 

 

Wake Up and Read at the UCBA Library

Wake Up and Read at Your UCBA Library graphic

Celebrate National Library Week with fun activities and chances to win an Exam Week Survival basket of goodies! Collect a raffle ticket for participating in activities and earn additional chances to win each time you participate!

Monday, April 9 – Friday, April 13

Monday – Friday

  • Donate a children’s book! All donations go to local, non-profit Adopt a Book, (which was started in 2011 by local 8 year old siblings).
    • Accepted donations: new or used (in good condition) books for ages birth through high school.
    • Donations not accepted: magazines, encyclopedias, and textbooks.
  • Recommend your favorite book(s) to fellow students!

Friday

  • “Wake Up and Read” but leave those jammies on! Wear your pajamas and earn another raffle ticket!

Come to the Library Information Desk to participate in the above activities and collect your raffle tickets!

The more you celebrate National Library Week with us, the more chances you’ll have to win the amazing Exam Week Survival basket on display at the Library Information Desk!

Other Activities:

  • UCBA student-designed button giveaway
  • “Guess How Many Bookworms” contest. The winner gets an entire jar of gummy worms!
  • Free color therapy bookmarks
  • Donuts and coffee on Friday morning beginning at 8:30 a.m.
  • Cast a vote in UCBA Library’s 1st Annual Tournament of Titles

Announcing the UCBA Button Design Contest Winner

Amber holding buttonAmber Lanese’s winning button design

Congratulations to Amber Lanese, the winner of a $30 UC Bookstore Gift certificate, UCBA candy-filled cup and bragging rights! Her design entry received the most votes of any entrant, and has been crowned the winner!

Amber with prize and winning buttonAmber with gift and winning button

We want to send a big thank you to everyone who participated in our button design contest and helped make it a success!

display of all button entries

 

From the Desk of…Elizabeth Sullivan

Elizabeth Sullivan, Library Operations Manager, UCBA Library.

Welcome to my own little nook of the UCBA Library! I’m clearly hard at work, but I’ll happily pause and give you a peek into my space.

From the Desk of … Michelle McKinney

I’m Michelle McKinney, Reference and Web Services Librarian for the UCBA Library. I’m usually behind the camera for the From the Desk Of… posts but it’s time for me to switch gears and welcome you to my office space. There’s no rhyme or reason to my set-up or decor. I like being surrounded by photos of family and friends. I’ve also started displaying a few of the gazillion art projects that my sons create. It’s not unusual to come across small toys that have accidentally ended up in my purse during our hectic mornings.

March Book of the Month

by Christian Boyles

March 2018

Tainted Witness book coverTainted Witness: Why We Doubt What Women Say About Their Lives
K3243 .G55 2017

About the Book

In 1991, Anita Hill’s testimony during Clarence Thomas’s Senate confirmation hearing brought the problem of sexual harassment to a public audience. Although widely believed by women, Hill was defamed by conservatives and Thomas was confirmed to the Supreme Court. The tainting of Hill and her testimony is part of a larger social history in which women find themselves caught up in a system that refuses to believe what they say. Hill’s experience shows how a tainted witness is not who someone is, but what someone can become. Tainted Witness examines how gender, race, and doubt stick to women witnesses as their testimony circulates in search of an adequate witness. Judgment falls unequally upon women who bear witness, as well-known conflicts about testimonial authority in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries reveal. Women’s testimonial accounts demonstrate both the symbolic potency of women’s bodies and speech in the public sphere and the relative lack of institutional security and control to which they can lay claim. Each testimonial act follows in the wake of a long and invidious association of race and gender with lying that can be found to this day within legal courts and everyday practices of judgment, defining these locations as willfully unknowing and hostile to complex accounts of harm. Bringing together feminist, literary, and legal frameworks, Leigh Gilmore provides provocative readings of what happens when women’s testimony is discredited. She demonstrates how testimony crosses jurisdictions, publics, and the unsteady line between truth and fiction in search of justice.

Is it checked out? Don’t worry about it. Here are some other titles on the subject.

Wrongful Convictions book cover

Wrongful Convictions of Women: When Innocence Isn’t Enough KF9756 .F74 2016 : Marvin Free and Mitch Ruesink reveal the distinctive role that gender dynamics so often play in the miscarriage of justice. Examining more than 160 cases involving such charges as homicide, child abuse, and drug-related offenses, the authors explore systemic failures in both policing and prosecution. They also highlight the intersecting roles of gender and race. Demonstrating how women encounter circumstances that are qualitatively different than those of men, the authors illuminate unique challenges facing women in the criminal justice system.

Equality on Trial book cover

Equality on trial: gender and rights in the modern American workplace (ebook): Synthesizing the histories of work, social movements, and civil rights in the postwar United States, Equality on Trial recovers the range of protagonists whose struggles forged the contemporary meanings of feminism, fairness, and labor rights.

Sisters of ’77 (DVD) HQ1403.N34 S67 2005: chronicles the 1977 National Women’s Conference in Houston, Texas, which took place November 18-21, 1977. The goal of the National Women’s Conference was to end discrimination against women and promote their equal rights. The conference was sponsored by President Gerald Ford’s Executive Order 11832 and federally funded through HR 9924. It brought together over 20,000 women and men from around the United States.

Sisters of 77 Cover ImageSisters of ’77 provides a look at a pivotal weekend that changed the course of history and the lives of the women who attended. The film incorporates rare archival footage and interviews of leaders relating this history to the present. Former first ladies Lady Bird Johnson, Betty Ford, and Rosalynn Carter were notable conference participants, and many influential women leaders attended, including Bella Abzug, Betty Friedan, Gloria Steinem, Eleanor Smeal, Ann Richards, Coretta Scott King, Billie Jean King, and Barbara Jordan.[3] The attendees included a wide range of women, such as Republicans, Democrats, African Americans, Asian Americans, Latinas, Native American, pro-choice, pro-life, straight, gay, liberal and conservative women.

 

 

 

UCBA Library Hosts 1st Faculty Lightning Talks

lighting talk graphic

By Lauren Wahman

 

These short, 15-minute presentations will showcase faculty research and share different aspects of the research process.

Thursday, March 22 2:00-3:00 pm
Muntz 117

Sonja Andrus
‘So, You Teach for Transfer. Do You Know What You’re Looking For?’ A Quick Look at Transfer in Two-Year College Students

Wendy Calaway & Keshar Ghimire
Evidence From Classroom Research:  Evaluating Students’ Perceptions Toward Courts and Police

Heather Vilvens
Creating Effective Safe Sleep Messaging for Caregivers of Infants Less than 1 Year Old