Science Gateways’ presentation & lunch with Dr. Sandra Gesing Oct 30th

Please join the Data and Computational Science Series (DCSS) team for a (free!) ‘Understanding Science Gateways’ presentation & lunch with Dr. Sandra Gesing, Computational Scientist, University of Notre Dame.

Science Gateways and the Science Gateways Community Institute (SGCI) with Dr. Sandra Gesing

Tuesday October 30 – TUC 400B FREE REGISTRATION

 

 

 

 

 

Science Gateways – also called virtual research environments or virtual labs – allow science and engineering communities to access shared data, software, computing services, instruments and other resources specific to their disciplines and use them also in teaching environments. The U.S. Science Gateways Community Institute (SGCI) provides free resources, services, experts, and ideas for creating and sustaining science gateways.

11am-1pm: General Introduction to Science Gateways & the Science Gateways Community Institute (SGCI) – Lunch provided

1pm-3pm: Science Gateways Presentation On Usability With Hands-On Portion – please bring a laptop

These events are free and open to all.

FREE REGISTRATION

Flyer – DCS2 _Intro to Science Gateways_30oct18

Flyer – DCS2 _Science Gateways Usability presentation_30oct18

General Introduction to Science Gateways & the Science Gateways Community Institute (SGCI)
In the last decade mature complete science gateway frameworks have evolved such as HUBzero, Galaxy, Agave and Apache Airavata. Successful implementations have been adapted for several science gateways, for example, the technologies behind the science gateways CIPRES, which is used by over 25.000 users to date and serves the community in the area of large phylogenetic trees. Lessons learned from the last decade include that approaches should be technology agnostic, use standard web technologies or deliver a complete solution. Independent of the technology, the major driver for science gateways are the user communities and user engagement is key for successful science gateways. The US Science Gateways Community Institute (SGCI), opened in August 2016, provides free resources, services, experts, and ideas for creating and sustaining science gateways. It offers five areas of services to the science gateway developer and user communities: the Incubator, Extended Developer Support, the Scientific Software Collaborative, Community Engagement and Exchange, and Workforce Development. The talk will give an introduction to science gateways, examples for science gateways & an overview on the services offered by the SGCI to serve user communities & developers for creating successful science gateways.

Discover UCIT Research Computing Tools and Services

 

 

 

 

UC Celebration of National GIS Day

Please mark your calendars on November 14, 2018 as UC Libraries will join the Department of Geography & GIS, GISSA and the Geography Graduate Student Association in celebrating National GIS Day.

This year’s speaker will be Dr. Daniel Sui , Vice President for Research, University of Arkansas and former Division Director for Social and Economic Sciences (SES) at the U.S. National Science Foundation.

Agenda:

Venue – 402 Braunstein Hall

10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. Open meet and greet

Venue – TUC 427

11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Lunch

12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. Featured Speaker: Dr. Daniel Sui

1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. Question and Answer Session

This event is free and open to all

Flyer – UC_GIS_Day

Second Mapathon to be held at UC Libraries – Nov 3rd, 2018

 

missing maps banner

 

 

 

 

 

 

On Nov 3rd, The Red Cross will hold their second Missing Maps Mapathon at UC Libraries in 475 Langsam from 10 am to 2 pm.  The information collected from a Mapathon helps the Red Cross identify the best locations to bring in emergency supplies, where to house emergency operations and what local resources they can collaborate with in emergency response efforts.  In order to participate, you do not need extensive mapping experience.  The maps are creating using the Open Street Map platform and you can learn quickly by watching these training videos (1. Create an Open Street Map account, 2. Learn to map buildings).

If you are interested to participate, please register here –  https://goo.gl/forms/b2sAl9zlS4ajSklg1  and watch the training videos.  A Pizza lunch will be provided for attendees.  Please bring a drink or refillable water bottle.  This is a great and fun way to get service hours if you need them.

Please contact Amy Koshoffer – ASKDATA@UC.EDU if you have questions about the event.  More information is provided in the attached flyer.

Flyer – Missing Maps Flyer rev. 10.3.18

Jetstream Hands-on Workshop October 31st

Indiana University’s Jeremy Fischer will present a hands-on workshop on Jetstream, a free, cloud-based, on-demand high performance computing resource.
Please join IT@UC R&D and UCL on October 31 from 9:30am to 12:30pm in Langsam Library room 475 for a free workshop on Jetstream, the National Science Foundation’s first science and engineering cloud. With a focus on ease of use and broad accessibility, Jetstream is designed for those who have not previously used high performance computing and software resources.

Jetstream Core capabilities

  • Interactive virtual machines (VMs) – both a public library of preconfigured VMs and a private library with saved, personalized versions
  • Secure data movement using Globus Transfer
  • Virtual desktops for access from a tablet or laptop over a cellular network
  • Reproducible data analysis using digital object identifiers (DOIs) stored and published via IU’s digital archive

Workshops are open to anyone who interested in learning about Jetstream resources. There are no prerequisites for attending. Please bring a lap top.   REGISTER

Flyer: jetstream_oct_31

For additional information, contact Jane Combs at combsje@uc.edu.

After the workshop head to the Catskeller for the first Data Science Social from 4-6 pm.  Food provided through the Provost funded Data & Computational Science Series.  Drinks on you!

Videos from Research Reproducibility workshops now available

Many thanks to all who attended the UC Libraries and IT@UC  Research Reproducibility Workshops offered on Oct 3rd and 4th.  We are especially thankful to April Clyburne-Sherin, Director of Scientific Outreach for Code Ocean who came and shared her knowledge part of the Provost sponsored Data and Computational Science Series.  The videos from the workshop are available through the STRC youtube channel and at these links:

Oct 3rd – Video – Integrating reproducible best practices into biomedical & clinical research : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V_VBmFNXWg0 

Slides – http://bit.ly/2DToKHt

Oct 4th – Preparing your data and code for reproductive publication: https://youtu.be/TkQbtEYXuUA 

Slides – shorturl.at/iwDVY

Also many thanks to Jay Sinnard and Jace Cheeseman for capturing and creating the videos.  We are grateful for the talent and knowledge in the STRC!

If you want to discuss research reproducibility or other data related issues, please contact the UC Libraries Research and Data Services Team at ASKDATA@UC.EDU.  

XSEDE HPC Workshop: GPU Programming Using OpenACC

XSEDE HPC Workshop: GPU Programming Using OpenACC

Free Registration (required)

Description:    The University of Cincinnati is pleased to be a remote site for the XSEDE HPC Workshop GPU Programming using OpenACC, taught by the Pittsburg Supercomputing Center. OpenACC is the accepted standard using compiler directives to allow quick development of GPU capable codes using standard languages and compilers. It has been used with great success to accelerate real applications within very short development periods. This workshop assumes knowledge of either C or Fortran programming.  Due to demand, this workshop is telecast to several satellite sites. Tentative Agenda

When:           November 6, 2018: 11am – 5pm

Location:    University Hall Room 454
51 Goodman Street
Cincinnati, OH 45221

Note:               You need an XSEDE account to register Create Account

Parking:          Kingsgate Garage, 151 Goodman Street

Special Instructions: Participants should bring their own laptop, lunch will be provided.

Questions?     Contact Amy Latessa latessak@uc.edu

XSEDE (eXtreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment) is a virtual system that provides compute resources for scientists and researchers from all over the country. Its mission is to facilitate research collaboration among institutions, enhance research productivity, provide remote data transfer, and enable remote instrumentation. XSEDE is funded by National Science Foundation (NSF).  Getting Started Guide for XSEDE.

Flyer – DCS2-OpenACC Nov 6, 2018

 

How UC Researchers use the Open Science Framework – Karlynn BrintzenhofeSzoc, CAHS-School of Social Work, Associate Professor

In our third installment of the series “How UC Researchers use the Open Science Framework”, we hear from

Karlynn BrintzenhofeSzoc, CAHS-School of Social Work, Associate Professor

Karlynn Brintzenhofeszoc, CAHS-School of Social Work, Associate Professor

 

Research Project Description or statement about your research interest:

I am working with a group of trans-disciplinary researchers who focus on the current state of care for older adults with cancer.  It is well known that enrollment of older adults into cancer clinical trials is not proportional to the number of older adults who are diagnosed with and treated for cancer.  Further there is little known about how older patients who participated in clinical trials respond to treatments.  And we do not have a clear understanding of the many factors that affect their quality of life during treatment such as drug tolerance levels or best practices in coordinating their care.

Additionally, The American Society for Clinical Oncology (https://www.asco.org/) published a call to increase the recruitment of older adults into trials.  One of the main recommendations they made is that journals develop policies that would involve a better reporting system that would encourage data to be analyzed and reported by age groups on efficacy and adverse effects.  This change could improve clinical practice and likely improve the quality of life of older adults.

Our research project will take a snapshot of the literature and focus on Phase III therapeutic cancer clinical trials.  We are conducting a systematic review of the literature for the time frame of July 1 2016 to June 30 2017.  One of the data points we are gathering is inclusion and exclusion criteria which have an upper age cutoff.  Already we see in the literature that there is an inconsistency in age reporting.  Also, it is difficult to find reports where the results are stratified for older adults.  And in order to set best practices, we believe researchers need to pay more attention to older adults when reporting outcomes.

This group of researchers and clinicians are a part of the Cancer and Aging Research Group (mycarg.org) which is a national advocacy group that funds and supports research to provide better coordinated care for older adults with cancer.

Why did you chose to use the OSF to organize your research/projects?

We started off using another workflow to assign readings to reviewers and it was a disaster in record keeping.   We couldn’t figure out what articles had been assigned to reviewers, and if and when they had completed their assigned readings.

Then I discovered the Open Science Framework (through an email from the library) and switched to using the OSF.  It was very easy to transition our workflow to this system.  We could set up projects in the OSF, connect with the reviewers by inviting them to be collaborators, and share their tasks through the OSF.  We created files (or components in the OSF) for each person.  We loaded their reading assignments into the project and were able to track when they opened the files.  So we knew what was getting done and what still needed to be addressed.  It was very easy to use, especially for collaborators with virtually no training needed.  There was no angst or pain with the system.  It is also very easy to add and remove collaborators.

What about the OSF makes this tool a good choice for your project management (i.e. specific function of the OSF)?

I LOVE the notification features.  We can track that the work is being done by the reviewers assigned.  And it is easy to extract the data from a collection document in the OSF into our REDCap data management system.

Additional comment for the post that you are willing to share:

A second group of clinicians and researchers who are members of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC; mascc.org) are starting another project using the OSF.  A CARG clinicians, who is leading this second project that is looking at shared decision making with older adults with cancer, has also decided to use OSF for the project.

The OSF has a lot of potential.  I personally could use it more, but would want additional training to understand all the functionality of the OSF.  And I love that the platform is accessible anywhere.

Currently our project is only accessible to collaborators, but it will be easy to open components of the project if we choose or need to share some of our findings.

 

How UC Researchers use the Open Science Framework – UC Center for Police Research and Policy

In our second installment of the series “How UC Researchers use the Open Science Framework”, we hear from Hannah McManus, Gabrielle Isaza, and Clair Green-Schwartz, Research Associates with the IACP / UC Center for Police Research and Policy 

Hannah McManus, Gabrielle Isaza, and Clair Green-Schwartz, Research Associates with the IACP / UC Center for Police Research and Policy

Research Project Description or statement about your research interest

The International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP)/University of Cincinnati (UC) Center for Police Research and Policy engages in rigorous research that has practical implications for the field and is intended to serve as a national model for the way law enforcement agencies and researchers work together to help protect communities, safeguard citizens’ rights, and ensure the fair treatment of all individuals.

There is currently a gap between research and practice, and the IACP/UC Center for Police Research and Policy seeks to play an important role in closing that gap. Often times existing research does not provide actionable recommendations that can be easily translated into specific, practical policies and practices that could enhance policing. Moreover, academic researchers often do not have access to all the data that police departments have that is necessary to conduct rigorous and meaningful research on police practices. The goal of the IACP/UC Center for Police Research and Policy is to provide a path for law enforcement and researchers to work together on studies that can drive future practices and policies.

Why did you chose to use the OSF to organize your research/projects?

The IACP/UC Center for Police Research and Policy is funded by the Laura and John Arnold Foundation (LJAF). The LJAF is committed to funding research that meets the most rigorous standards of quality and transparency. As such, we make public our preregistration document for each project, which involves describing the research design in detail before the statistical analyses are performed. Further, we update the Center’s OSF profile as we gather more information on individual projects, and submit all applicable research materials onto the OSF for public viewing. At the end of our research projects, we include the findings either in the form of a written report or a link to a publication or preprint elsewhere. These findings must be freely available in some form, which removes the financial barriers that some may face when trying to access research. The Center’s OSF webpage thus provides a comprehensive overview of an entire research project from start to finish. And further, in the event that a research project does not lead to a peer-reviewed publication, posting the results at OSF serves a valuable informative purpose.

What about the OSF makes this tool a good choice for your project management (i.e. specific function of the OSF)?

The OSF is a useful web platform to centralize all parts of the project from initial idea to final results. It keeps a useful history of documents for us to track changes and progress over time. Ultimately, this tool is most useful in its ability to serve as a platform for transparency in research.

Please use this link for further detail about the Center for Police Research and Policy’s research projects:

https://osf.io/f2drv/

XSEDE HPC Workshop: MPI on Oct 2 and Oct 3

As part of the Provost Funded Data & Computational Science Series, IT@UC is offering the next XSEDE workshop on MPI:

Free Registration (required)

Description: The University of Cincinnati is pleased to be a remote site for the XSEDE HPC Workshop MPI, taught by the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center. This workshop is intended to give C and Fortran programmers a hands-on introduction to MPI programming. Both days are packed with useful information and lab exercises. Attendees will leave with a working knowledge of how to write scalable codes using MPI – the standard programming tool of scalable parallel computing. Due to demand, this workshop is telecast to several satellite sites. Tentative Schedule

When:                 October 2 & 3, 2018 – 11am – 5pm

Location:             University Hall Room 454
51 Goodman Street
Cincinnati, OH 45221

Free Registration (required)

Note:                   You need an XSEDE account to register Create Account

Parking:               Kingsgate Garage, 151 Goodman Street

Special Instructions: Participants should bring their own laptop, lunch will be provided.

Questions?         Contact Amy Latessa latessak@uc.edu

XSEDE (eXtreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment) is a virtual system that provides compute resources for scientists and researchers from all over the country. Its mission is to facilitate research collaboration among institutions, enhance research productivity, provide remote data transfer, and enable remote instrumentation. XSEDE is funded by National Science Foundation (NSF).  Getting Started Guide for XSEDE.

 

Flyer – DCS2-MPI Oct 2-3, 2018

Workshops on Research Reproducibility

Research Reproducibility Workshops

workshops facilitator April Clyburne-Sherin
workshops facilitator April Clyburne-Sherin

UC Libraries and IT@UC are pleased to offer two workshops on Research Reproducibility as part of the Data and Computational Science Series.  We are partnering with Code Ocean to offer these workshop on Oct 3rd and 4th.  The workshops facilitator is April Clyburne-Sherin from Code Ocean.  April is an epidemiologist, methodologist and expert in open science tools, methods, training and community stewardship. She holds an MS in Population Medicine (Epidemiology). Since 2014, she has focused on creating curriculum and running workshops for scientists in open and reproducible research methods and is co-author of FOSTER’s Open Science Training Handbook. She is currently the Director of Scientific Outreach for the reproducibility platform Code Ocean.  Code Ocean (https://codeocean.com/) is a cloud-based computational reproducibility platform that provides researchers and developers an easy way to share, discover and run code published in academic journals and conferences.  Their mission is to make the world’s scientific code more reusable, executable and reproducible.  More information and registration for the workshops can be found at the links below.  Questions?  Email AskData@UC.Edu.  The events are free and open to all.

Workshop 1 — East Campus, Biomedical and Clinical Focus

URL – https://webapps2.uc.edu/ce/FacDev/Workshops/Details/11432

Title: Integrating reproducible best practices into biomedical and clinical research: A hands-on workshop for researchers – Data And Computational Science Series

Date: Wednesday, Oct. 3, 1 – 3pm

Location: Troup Learning Space Conf Rm-MSB G005G

Workshop 2 — West Campus, General Audience

URL – https://webapps2.uc.edu/ce/FacDev/Workshops/Details/11433

Title: Preparing your data and code for reproducible publication: A hands-on workshop for researchers – Data And Computational Science Series

Date: Thursday, Oct. 4, 10am – 12pm

Location: CEAS Library Classroom 850D Baldwin

DCS2 CodeOcean_flyerV2