Books on the Big Screen at CECH

Summer is a great time to relax and catch up on all those shows you never got around to watching. Summer is also a great time for reading. So before you binge on Netflix, check out the books that came before the films. The CECH Library has many books that have been adapted for film and television. From the classics like Little Women to the ever-popular Shadow and Bone, there is something for everyone.

TV and film adaptations can be an excellent way to introduce readers to books they may not naturally be drawn to. In addition to aiding with understanding or reading comprehension, they can also assist with understanding difficult vocabulary. Film and TV adaptations can be a helpful motivator for reluctant readers. 

Whether you read before you watch or decide to pick up the book because you loved the show or movie, the CECH Library has got you covered! Check out this list of selected titles that have film or TV adaptations.  

Post by Haley Shaw, CECH Temporary Librarian
List by Sadie Matthews, CECH Library Student Worker

Read AAPI: Asian American Pacific Islander Month

collage of book covers

May is Asian American Pacific Islander (AAPI) Month. To celebrate, the CECH Library has created a list of books by AAPI authors.  

Update: The use of the term #OwnVoices has been discontinued by We Need Diverse Books and the booklist below has been updated to reflect that. #OwnVoices has been used by many publishers/bookstores as catch all for diverse authors and illustrators, making it a vague term that hides the diverse identities of the authors and the book characters from the narrative. Why We Need Diverse Books Is No Longer Using the Term #OwnVoices.

What makes a book Own Voices? 

An Own Voices book is one that is written by an author that is part of an under-represented group that features characters that are also part of that group. For example, if an author is part of the LGBTQ+ community and they write about a character that is also part of the LGBTQ+ community then that book is an Own Voices book. 

#OwnVoices was created by Corinne Duyvisa young adult author and co-founder of Disability in Kidlit. She created the hashtag to shardiverse children’s literature.  

Why are Own Voices books important? 

Own Voices books amplifdiverse voices and provide necessary and important representation on our shelvesWhen book authors identify with the same group as their characters, they are more likely to have accurate and nuanced portrayals of that group than an author who is an outsider. Own Voices books are also less likely to perpetuate harmful stereotypes. 

How can I find Own Voices books? 

Many libraries, bookstores, and publishers develop Own Voices book lists. You can also search for #OwnVoices on social media to find reviews and book lists.  CECH Library’s AAPI book list is also available via our Children’s and Young Adult Literature LibGuide.

Interested in learning more? 

Post and book list by Haley Shaw, CECH Temporary Librarian

National Poetry Month at CECH Library

To celebrate National Poetry Month, the CECH Library has created a display of poetry from our children’s and young adult book collections.  From classic children’s poetry to new titles, our curated list also features a selection of young poets under 25 that is excellent for young readers!

Visit the display in the CECH Library through April or check out our recommended reading list via the Children’s and Young Adult Literature guide.

Post and book list by Alyssa Gruich, CECH Library Student Assistant | Political Science, A&S 2022

New Book Spotlight: Lovely War by Julie Berry

book cover lovely war by julie berryThe New Book Spotlight highlights new-to-us titles in the the UC College of Education, Criminal Justice, and Human Services (CECH) Library

Lovely War / written by Julie Berry / 2019

A mix of historical fiction, romance, and mythology, Lovely War sees Greek Gods narrating an emotional story of two relationships, two wars, and the power of love. Accused of unfaithfulness by Hephaestus, Aphrodite has the chance to avoid trial by the Gods and tell the story of four mortals during WWI and the transcendence of love. It tells the story of James, a young British man drafted to serve in the army in France, falling for Hazel, a young and hopeful pianist. It also spans the story of Aubrey, a black soldier and ragtime pianist with Colette, a singer from Belgium who lost her family in Dinant. Showing perspectives on racism, sexism, mental health issues, and the tragic nature of war, Berry does an excellent job in incorporating the historical aspect during the time period, as well as the heart-wrenching circumstances young adults faced during the time. Topping my favorite books of 2020, Lovely War was an excellent and timeless read, showing the importance of hope, humanity, and friendship perfect for any young reader.

Lovely War is available from CECH Library,  as well as the OhioLINK and Search Ohio lending networks.

Review by Alyssa Gruich, CECH Library Student Assistant | Political Science, A&S 2022

Online Options for Children’s Literature

Your CECH Library and local public libraries may be closed, but there are still several ways to access the children’s literature resources you need for classes, research, teaching, and learning — or simply keeping the kids in your life entertained! This blog post will feature a few key resources.

TumbleBook Library is an online collection of books. There are animated talking picture books, e-books, and informational videos. TumbleBook also offers games and quizzes. There are books in English, French, and Spanish. The site also features lists of books that meet specific Common Core Standards. TumbleBook Library can be accessed for free with your UC Login. Connect to TumbleBook Library

International Children’s Digital Library is a free collection of children’s books from all over the world. There are books in many different languages, including award winners. Connect to the International Children’s Digital Library

BookFlix is a resource provided through INFOhio. It pairs fiction and non-fiction picture books for themed lessons. Each lesson contains an animated read-along and an e-book as well as activities and additional information. It has books in English and Spanish, including classic favorites like Knuffle Bunny, Where the Wild Things Are, and Harold and the Purple Crayon. INFOhio login required for access. Email the CECH Library at cechlibrary@uc.edu for login info. Connect to BookFlix

A full list of online resources for children’s and young adult literature can be found on our Children’s and Young Adult Literature guide. Additional online resources may also be available from your local public library as well.

Haley Shaw, Temporary Librarian
CECH Library

Geography Spotlight in Children’s Literature: South America

Picture of display case filled with books and materials for children with South American themes

The CECH Library collections include many titles for children that dive into the history and culture of South America. In addition to books, there are also kits and maps that bring these topics to life!

Visit this display in the CECH Library through March and check out some of the titles on our list of books about South America.

Sara Polk, CECH Library Student Assistant
A&S Anthropology & Archaeology, 2020

Children’s Books at Clermont College Library

“Not all those who wander are lost.” J.R.R. Tolkien

library lightsNeed an escape from your studies? Do you want to go through a wardrobe into another world, fall down a rabbit hole or see the wizard?oto

You can do all this and more on the second floor of the library. There you will find our selection of children’s literature in the PZs. You might even discover some new friends while reconnecting with old ones!

Check them out at Clermont College Library.

Natalie Winland
Public Services Manager