UC Libraries Seeks Books Good Enough to Eat for the International Edible Books Festival

20,000 Leagues Under the Sea
2018 Best Overall – 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea by Jessica Ebert

Know of a good book to eat?! Create an Edible Book for UC Libraries International Edible Books Festival!

It’s time once again for the fan-favorite International Edible Books Festival scheduled for Monday, April 1, 2019, from 1-2:00pm in the Walter C. Langsam Library’s 5th floor lobby. UC Libraries is seeking people interested in creating an edible book for the enjoyment (and consumption) of all in attendance. There are few restrictions – namely that your creation be edible and have something to do with a book – so you may let your creativity run wild.

t-shirtAs in previous years, entries will be judged according to such categories as “Most Delicious,” “Most Creative,” “Most Checked Out” and “Most Literary.” Those awarded “Best Student Entry” and “Best Overall” will win a limited-edition UC Libraries t-shirt.

If you are interested in creating an edible book, please e-mail melissa.norris@uc.edu by Friday, March 22 with your name and the title of your creation.

Looking for inspiration? Visit UC Libraries on Facebook to see photos from the 2018 festival.

A Complete Qual Lab : Notes from the Oesper Collections, No. 54, January/February 2019

The extraordinary
lab bench, chemicals
and equipment for
performing qualitative
chemical analysis offered for sale in the 1902
catalog of the Viennese
laboratory supply house of Lenoir and Forster.

Issue 54 reviews the various chests of reagents and apparatus sold over the last 250 years to private chemists and students wishing to perform qualitative chemical analysis and as highlighted in our collections of apparatus catalogs and monographs.

 Click here for all other issues of Notes from the Oesper Collections and to explore the Jensen-Thomas Apparatus Collection.

Read Source to learn more about the news, events, people and happenings in UC Libraries.

source graphicRead Source, the online newsletter, to learn more about the news, events, people and happenings in UC Libraries.

In this edition of Source, Dean Xuemao Wang writes about the university’s Bicentennial and we announce an exhibit of books from the libraries that document the university’s 200 years.  We interview Brad Warren, associate dean of library services, and focus on the Visualization Lab located in the Geology-Mathematics-Physics Library.

An article from Rich Puff, assistant vice president of public relations & communications, Academic Health Center, honors Lucy Oxley, MD, ‘a pioneer and a servant leader.’ University archivist and head of the Archives and Rare Books Library Kevin Grace writes about James Landy’s 1876 images celebrating William Shakespeare

Lastly, we promote to upcoming events: Hidden Treasures: An Adopt-A-Book Evening on March 14 and the Cecil Striker Society Annual Lecture on May 15.

Read these articles, as well as past issues, on the web at http://libapps.libraries.uc.edu/source/ and via e-mail. To receive Source via e-mail, contact melissa.norris@uc.edu to be added to the mailing list.

The Surviving Legacies of Early Spain or Influences in Early Spanish History

By:  Savannah Gulick, Archives & Rare Books Library Student Assistant

Roman Aqueduct in SegoviaAs a Spanish and International Affairs major, travel, global politics, and reading have always been of interest to me. Fortunately, our Archives & Rare Books Library contains an extensive collection on early exploration and travel accounts.  Just having recently returned from Spain, I want to focus this blog on a few of the Spanish-centered accounts.  For most people, Spanish history is often minimized to a few events: Christopher Columbus’ discovery of the Americas and the dictatorship under Franco. Because of this, I want to highlight other important centuries of Spanish history while pulling some  illustrations and details from our various books.

Spanish history is full of wars amongst powerful nations (Roman, Moorish), famous people (Seneca, Trajan), and important discoveries (antiseptics, modern surgery). Owning Spain was important to trading, resource extraction, and crucial routes A door in the Alcazar Cathedralbetween Europe and Africa. One such empire that realized the value of Spain and would hold power of the area for centuries was Rome. To this day, the Roman impact on Spain is still evident: Segovian Aqueduct as illustrated in Edward Locker’s Views of Spain (1824) continues to provide water; Roman law; Christianity; the Romance language of Spanish;  and the prevalence of olive oil and wine in the cuisine.

Following Roman rule, the Moors from North Africa arrived and claimed land in the southern peninsula. From the architecture to the language, and even the agriculture, the Moors shaped a significant part of Spain’s history much like Rome. The exquisite palace, Alcazar of Seville, remains one of the greatest and most beautiful examples of Islamic architecture. The same architectural style can also be seen in the Great Mosque of Cordoba. S. P. Scott’s Through Spain: A Narrative of Travel and Adventure in the Peninsula (1886) highlights the impressive beauty of the Alcazar and the Mosque.

the Great Mosque of CordobaDuring the Middle Ages, both types of architecture (Roman and Moorish) alongside newer styles from the ruling Hapsburgs or Bourbons would create iconic cathedrals, palaces, and public buildings. One example of this mixture of architectural styles is the La Seo Cathedral in Zaragoza. Although it is hard to see in the stone etching of the cathedral from Locker’s Views of Spain (1824), the structure contains a Romanesque apse, a Baroque tower, Mudejar exterior walls, and a Gothic altarpiece. The conglomeration of multiple styles illustrates the diverse and rich history of Spain and highlights the acceptance of cultural differences that was evident throughout much of the nation’s history – minus a few dark periods, of course.

Zaragoza CathedralFor more information about early exploration of Spain or other travel accounts, visit the Archives & Rare Books Library on the 8th floor of Blegen Library.  We are open Monday through Friday, 8:00 am-5:00 pm.  You can also call us at 513.556.1959, email us at archives@ucmail.uc.edu, visit us on the web at. http://www.libraries.uc.edu/arb.html, or have a look at our Facebook page,  https://www.facebook.com/ArchivesRareBooksLibraryUniversityOfCincinnati.

VOLTAGE UCID19 SHOW!!

 

The Robert A. Deshon and Karl J. Schlachter Library of DAAP would like to invite all to attend:

Tony Kawanari‘s chair design class’s exhibit on March 1st at VOLTAGE.

3209 Madison Road, Cincinnati, OH 45209

From 7:00 pm- 9:00 pm

All are welcome to come and celebrate DAAP’s design students at this fun opening!

Adult drinks and other refreshments will be served.

Be there or be a square chair! 😉

 

Join Us Feb. 27 for UC Libraries’ Black History Month Celebration Featuring Author Carol Tongue Mack

carol tongue-mack flyerIn celebration of Black History Month, UC Libraries is holding an event featuring author Carol Tongue Mack who will discuss her book Being Bernadette: From Polite Silence to Finding the Black Girl Magic Within. In her memoir, Carol Tonge Mack takes us on a journey from a small town in Antigua to the streets of the South Bronx to private college life in New England to a career in academia.

February 27, 2:00 – 3:00pm, 465 Walter C. Langsam Library

The program will also include a book giveaway, cultural food favorites, spoken word poetry and student-shared study abroad experiences. The event is free and open to all.

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Carol Tonge Mack is an accomplished leader in higher education. With nearly 20 years of experience, she has a longstanding commitment to mentoring and graduating scores of students, creating innovative strategies for success, empowering women to lead regardless of their position and collaborating with community stakeholders.

Currently, Carol is an assistant dean at the University of Cincinnati with the College of Arts and Sciences (A&S). For the past six years, she served as the college conduct administrator for academic misconduct and works collaboratively with the Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards.  She is the co-founder of the University of Cincinnati’s Black Women on the Move, an employee resource group designed to create systematic and holistic changes university-wide to support and empower Black female staff members. Carol also built the university’s first Cultural Competence Workshop Series for the academic advising staff in the College of Arts and Sciences.

And don’t miss – a table display featuring African-American authors and poets on display on the 4th floor of Langsam Library.

 

The Kennedy Letter

By: Alex Temple, Gettler Project Archivist

I’ve been lost in the archives, and finally found my way out!  I’ve actually been taking some time to look at the collection as a whole, and have been eager to get back into looking at some of the contents at a closer level.  One piece which caught my attention early on was a letter from none other than Robert F. Kennedy, from 1957.  I’ve been excited to dig into this and learn more about the people in the letter and circumstances surrounding it.

Letter from Robert F. Kennedy to Benjamin Gettler regarding the Hoffa case

Continue reading The Kennedy Letter

March 6 Life of the Mind lecture to once again address the topic of “Next”

life of the mind graphicLife of the Mind, interdisciplinary conversations with UC faculty, will return Wednesday, March 6, 2019 from 2:30-4:30pm, in TUC 400B with a lecture by Stephen Meyer, professor of musicology in the College-Conservatory of Music. Professor Meyer will speak on “Beyond Decanonization: The Future of Humanities in the Neoliberal University.”

Life of the Mind is a semi-annual lecture series that features a distinguished University of Cincinnati faculty member presenting his or her work and expertise. The series includes intriguing insights from diverse perspectives and encourages faculty and students from across the university to engage in further discourse. The presentation is not simply a recitation of the faculty member’s work but promotes an informed point of view.

Stephen Meyer specializes in early 19th-century opera, film music, music history pedagogy, music and medievalism and the history of recorded sound. He is the editor-in-chief of the Journal of Music History Pedagogy.

stephen meyer
Stephen Meyer

Meyer’s presentation will build on his recently published work on transformations in the canon of works that served as the core of the music history curriculum for much of the 20th century. The hegemony of this canon — formed almost exclusively from the works of white, male composers — was challenged and at least partially deconstructed during the 1980s and ’90s. During these years, musicology was enriched by new critical approaches and methodologies that exposed the relationship between the historical canon and contemporary power structures. Ethnomusicology and popular music studies made new repertoires the subject of serious scholarly work, and the field seemed poised for a period of rapid expansion. And yet this expansion — at least insofar as it might be measured by an increase in the number of tenure-track positions allotted to musicology in North American universities — failed to materialize.

In this sense, what might be called the “de-institutionalization” of musicology participates in the so-called “crisis of the humanities”: the seemingly inexorable shift of resources away from the humanities and towards supposedly more profitable and applicable disciplines. Meyer’s presentation will use musicology as a case example through which to ponder the ways in which the humanities might reposition themselves in a post-canonic, multi-cultural and transformational society.

A panel of four UC faculty members will respond to and discuss the lecture from diverse perspectives. The March 6 Life of the Mind panel will consist of:

  • Alberto Espay, professor of neurology, College of Medicine
  • James Mack, professor of chemistry, College of Arts and Sciences, associate dean, The Graduate School
  • Tamika Odum, assistant professor, behavioral sciences, UC Blue Ash College
  • Rebecca Williamson, associate professor, architecture and interior design, College of Design, Architecture, Art and Planning

Sponsored by the Office of the Senior Vice President and Provost, and organized by the University of Cincinnati Libraries and Faculty Senate, the mission of Life of the Mind is to celebrate UC faculty research, scholarship and creative output and to foster the free and open exchange of ideas and discourse. Life of the Mind is free and open to the public and attracts a broad audience including UC students, faculty, staff and alumni, as well as people from the community.

More information about Life of the Mind is available online at www.libraries.uc.edu/lifeofthemind/.

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To continue the conversation on humanities and higher education, attend the Taft Center Lecture “Humanities Education at the Crossroads: Why the Liberal Arts are Fundamental to Democracy” presented by William Egginton, Thursday, March 7 at 3:00p.m.

UC Black Women on the Move and UC Libraries Co-Sponsoring “Sister Speak Published Edition” Feb. 21

Come out Thursday, Feb. 21, 6-8pm, at the African American Cultural & Resource Center and be inspired by the stories of black women authors as they share insight on their journey to becoming published.  This event is free and open to the public. This event is sponsored by UC Black Women on the Move and the University of Cincinnati Libraries.  To RSVP, or for more information, contact Ewaniki Moore-Hawkins at mooreek@ucmail.uc.edu.

Light refreshments will be served.  The panelists’ books will be available for purchase.

Sister Speak flyer

 

 

Berg Fashion Library

Fashion Design Students!

Please check out the Berg Fashion Library

Its amazing features include:

  • Reference works including the 10-volume Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion, A–Z of Fashion, and The Dictionary of Fashion History
  • More than 100 academic eBooks
  • An invaluable museum directory
  • Over 13,000 color images from prestigious partners such as the Costume Institute at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Victoria and Albert Museum, the Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology, Mode Museum, and the Commercial Pattern Archive
  • Unique exhibition archive, which showcases images from historic exhibitions from museums around the world, including the Museum at Fashion Institute of Technology and Somerset House