Welcome, Sarah Muncy, Assistant Managing Editor for the University of Cincinnati Press

sarah muncy Sarah Muncy has accepted the position of full time assistant managing editor for the University of Cincinnati Press. Sarah, who started at the Press in August 2017, began as a 2nd year graduate assistant working in the role of editorial assistant. After earning her master’s in history from the University of Cincinnati, she stayed on with the Press in a new position as temporary production coordinator.

In her new role as assistant managing editor, Sarah will coordinate production activities for both CLIPS and university press imprints, which includes creating productions schedules, working with contracted authors and journal editors, coordinating freelance typesetters and designers, evaluating art and cover designs, maintaining print vendor relationships, sending typesetter files to printers and e-book converters and overseeing countless other details from permissions to copyright.

Sarah was recently awarded one of four prestigious 2019 Early Career Fellowships from the Society for Scholarly Publishers (SSP). This one-year fellowship includes an all-expense paid trip to the SSP annual meeting in San Diego, California, followed by career development, training, registration to select events throughout the year and an invitation to participate on SSP committees and mentoring activities.

For more about the University of Cincinnati Press, visit their website at https://ucincinnatipress.uc.edu/.

Welcome to the Press and to the Libraries, Sarah.

Fabric Design Trade Show

Students in Ashley Kubley’s FASH3020 Computer Aided Design for Fashion took part in a mini-trade show on April 19th, 2019 in the Robert A. Deshon and Karl J. Schlachter Library of DAAP. Representatives from Abercrombie & Fitch and Lectra Technologies were present to judge student work.

These students used the new Fashion Technology Center Lab resources (digital fabric printing and embroidery) and the Rapid Prototyping Center (laser cutting, etching, 3d printing) to complete their fabric samples, as well as, kaledo software. For those interested, there are more photos of work on Instagram @ #daapfashioncad

A reception in the library was enjoyed by all afterward.

   

Traveling to Hogwarts with the STRC

Recently, eight students from Dr. Brittany Rosen’s HPE 7040 Social & Behavioral Health class used the services of UC Libraries and the Student Technology Resources Center (STRC) to create a video about the importance of dental care. The students borrowed several pieces of equipment from the Desk@Langsam. They then shot the video in the STRC production room and worked with Jay Sinnard, manager of the STRC, to edit the video.

To view the videos produced in the STRC, visit their YouTube channel at https://www.youtube.com/user/STRC1.

Continue reading Traveling to Hogwarts with the STRC

Cecil Striker Society Annual Lecture Scheduled for May 15 to Celebrate Two Pioneers in Medical Education

cecil striker invite

The Henry R. Winkler Center for the History of the Health Professions and the Cecil Striker Society for the History of Medicine will host the 10th Cecil Striker Society Annual Lecture from 5:00-7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, May 15, in the Kresge Auditorium, Medical Sciences Building, 231 Albert Sabin Way.

This year’s lecture, titled Daniel Drake’s Connection to Sir William Osler: Celebrating Two Medical Education Reformers, will focus on the immense impact both physicians had on medical education. Philip M. Diller, M.D., Ph.D., and Robert E. Rakel, M.D., will serve as co-lecturers for the event. Continue reading Cecil Striker Society Annual Lecture Scheduled for May 15 to Celebrate Two Pioneers in Medical Education

A Garden of Artists’ Books

Stop in at the Robert A. Deshon and Karl J. Schlachter Library for Design, Art, Architecture & Planning (DAAP) to see a small exhibit of artists’ books that evoke summer. The selections all have either summer themes, colors or nod to summer activities.

A Garden of Artists’ Books: A Small Exhibit, by Andrea Chemero and Sara Mihaly.

“Not that Hungry” by Diane Stemper

A Summer Garden by Claire Lawson-Hall Illustrations by Muriel Mallows

 

Benjamin Gettler and the University of Cincinnati Board of Trustees

By:  Alex Temple, Benjamin Gettler Papers Project Archivist

I’ve mentioned before that Benjamin Gettler served on the Board of Trustees for the University of Cincinnati, but I haven’t really talked about how he got there or what that means.  In short, the Board of Trustees is the governing body of the University of Cincinnati.  There are 11 members total, who are recommended by the Ohio State Senate and appointed by the Governor of Ohio.  Among other responsibilities, they select and appoint the university president, set the university budget, and grant all degrees from the university.  The trustees set the framework for students’ experience at the University of Cincinnati, as they also are responsible for setting the tuition and approving university rules, curricula, and programs.  Gettler himself was key to the creation of the Judaic Studies Department.

Gettler was first recommended as a trustee to Governor George Voinovich by legislator Stanley Aronoff in October of 1992.  Aronoff lauded Gettler’s commitment to the Republican Party (Voinovich was a Republican governor) and business prowess, but it wasn’t until November of 1993 after a second recommendation from Bob Taft, that Voinovich would finally appoint Gettler.  Taft’s recommendation better highlighted Gettler’s qualifications as both a University of Cincinnati alumnus and significant donor.  Taft also praised his experience in law, finance, community service, and business in addition to his supportive activities with the Republican Party in local, state, and national issues.  He also put his own reputation on the line by making the recommendation out of personal familiarity with Gettler. Continue reading Benjamin Gettler and the University of Cincinnati Board of Trustees

Amy Koshoffer Named to the 2019 Cohort of TRELIS Fellows

Amy Koshoffer

Amy Koshoffer, science informationist in the Geology-Mathematics-Physics Library, was named to the 2019 cohort of TRELIS Fellows. Amy will join colleagues from around the country in Washington, D.C. at a workshop designed for professional development for women educators in geospatial sciences.

Below is the press release issued by TRELIS naming Amy to the cohort. Congratulations!

_____________________________

In June 2019, the TRELIS project, Training and Retaining Leaders in STEM-Geospatial Sciences, will hold its second workshop in Washington, D.C. TRELIS is a unique model for professional development for women educators in the geospatial sciences. The program builds leadership capacity and skills to address career development, communication, conflict resolution, and work-life integration. With the name, we instill the concept of a human capital trellis or scaffold of support, and embrace the reality of nonlinear career trajectories that move sideways, take leaps, and do not follow a single upward ladder. There is significant demand for TRELIS-related knowledge and support in the geospatial sciences, reflected in part by the large pool of applicants to TRELIS events each year.

We are pleased to announce the following members of our 2019 cohort. These TRELIS Fellows will participate in a 3-day workshop that has been designed to target topics and concerns of early-career individuals and focus on envisioning and crafting leadership pathways. Immediately following the workshop, the TRELIS Fellows will continue their professional development exchanges during the UCGIS Symposium.

 

  • Clio Andris, Pennsylvania State University
  • Sara Carr, Northeastern University
  • Li (Kerry) Fang, Florida State University
  • Kelly Gleason, Portland State University
  • Melinda Kernik, University of Minnesota
  • Marynia Kolak, University of Chicago
  • Amy Koshoffer, University of Cincinnati
  • Huyen Le, Virginia Tech University
  • Samiah Moustafa, Brown University
  • Stephanie Rogers, Auburn University
  • Vanessa Rojas, State University of New York – ESF
  • Donna Selch, Stony Brook University
  • Di Shi, University of Kansas
  • Monica Stephens, University at Buffalo
  • Caixia Wang, University of Alaska at Anchorage
  • Jennifer Watts, Woods Hole Research Center

TRELIS is managed by a leadership team from the University of Maine, Hunter College, the University of Colorado, the University of Southern California, Arizona State University, Tableau Software, and the University Consortium for Geographic Information Science (UCGIS). It is supported with generous funding from the National Science Foundation (NSF Grant #1660400). For more information, contact Kate Beard, TRELIS PI, at the University of Maine or look for resources at www.ucgis.org/TRELIS.

A Brief Introduction of Dr. William A. Altemeier

I’ve already introduced myself, but it’s occurred to me that I haven’t introduced Dr. Altemeier, who is, after all, the reason I’m here.  I apologize for the delay; his full and eventful life has been a lot to sort through.  While processing Dr. Altermeier’s collection,I’ve become very familiar with his work, activities, and influence. I’m amazed at how much someone can accomplish in one lifetime!

William Arthur Altemeier was born in Cincinnati, Ohio on July 6, 1910 to William Arthur Altemeier, Sr. and Carrie Moore Altemeier. He graduated cum laude from Walnut Hills High School in 1927, and went on to the University of Cincinnati, earning his Bachelor of Science degree in 1930.  He continued at the University of Cincinnati, earning his Doctorate of Medicine in 1933.  While working on his residency at the Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit, MI, he earned a Master of Surgery degree from the University of Michigan in 1938.

He immediately began his teaching career while still in Detroit, as Associate Surgeon at the Henry Ford Hospital from 1939-1940, and then returned to the University of Cincinnati as Instructor in Surgery in 1940. Twelve years later in 1952, he was named the Christian R. Holmes Professor of Surgery and Chairman of the Department of Surgery at the University of Cincinnati, a position he held for over 25 years, until 1978.

In addition to his educational appointments, he was the Director of Surgical Services at Cincinnati General Hospital (1952 – 1978) and Christ Hospital (1976 – 1978); Surgeon-in-Chief at Children’s and Holmes Hospitals (1952 – 1978); Consulting Surgeon at Dunham, Drake, and the V.A. Hospitals; and Assistant Chief of Staff at Holmes Hospital.

Beyond teaching and hospital administration, he was also a prominent researcher on topics such as wounds, burns, Gas Gangrene, Shock, Trauma, and Staphylococcal Infections. He performed research for the University of Cincinnati as well as the United States Surgeon General, and served on the National Research Council in the Division of Medical Sciences and United States Public Health Service. He was also very active in the medical professions community, serving as president of the American Surgical Association, president and one of the founders of the Surgical Infection Society, vice chairman of the American Board of Surgery, editorial board for American Surgeon, Annals of Surgery, and Journal of Surgical Research, and surgical consultant to the Surgeon General of the United States Public Health Service and to the United States Army in Japan and Korea.

As I continue working on this collection, I’m looking forward to sharing with you some of the items in the collection that demonstrate some of these contributions and achievements, and expanding in more detail their significance.  Contact me at templea@mail.uc.edu with any questions and insights.

-Alex Temple (Winkler Center Temporary Archivist)

“An Evening with Aristophanes”: Talk and Performances in the John Miller Burnam Classics Library

On March 28, 2019, faculty and students from CCM and Classics as well as from UCL gathered for an evening of fun, celebrating the life and work of the great Greek comedy playwright Aristophanes (ca. 446-386 BCE), especially his play Lysistrata about a strong and intelligent Athenian woman who hatches an ingenious plan to end the Peloponnesian War. The evening included an engaging expert talk by Susan Prince, Associate Professor of Classics, a recital, masterfully directed by Brant Russell, Assistant Professor of Acting at CCM, and brilliantly acted by graduate students from CCM and Classics, accompanied by superbly played “ancient Greek Dionysian” music, arranged by Yo Shionoya, graduate student at CCM and interim Student, Circulation, and Stack Supervisor in the Classics Library. The evening celebrating not only Aristophanes but also Dionysus, (Modern) Greek Independence Day, the Annunciation of the Theotokos, and the recent accomplishments of American female politicians(!) concluded with a delectable feast of Greek food and “wine”. To enjoy a video recording of the evening, see the link at the bottom of the page.

aristophanesflyer

aristophanes_program

Tweet by Neville G. Pinto, President of the University of Cincinnati:

https://twitter.com/Prez_Pinto/status/1110219524249477123

Theater in Ancient Athens was performed during festivals to honor Dionysus, the god of wine, fertility, theater, ecstatic dance and music. His attributes included grapes, pine cones, wine cups, vines, ivy, leopard skin.  Continue reading “An Evening with Aristophanes”: Talk and Performances in the John Miller Burnam Classics Library