VOLTAGE UCID19 SHOW!!

 

The Robert A. Deshon and Karl J. Schlachter Library of DAAP would like to invite all to attend:

Tony Kawanari‘s chair design class’s exhibit on March 1st at VOLTAGE.

3209 Madison Road, Cincinnati, OH 45209

From 7:00 pm- 9:00 pm

All are welcome to come and celebrate DAAP’s design students at this fun opening!

Adult drinks and other refreshments will be served.

Be there or be a square chair! 😉

 

Join Us Feb. 27 for UC Libraries’ Black History Month Celebration Featuring Author Carol Tongue Mack

carol tongue-mack flyerIn celebration of Black History Month, UC Libraries is holding an event featuring author Carol Tongue Mack who will discuss her book Being Bernadette: From Polite Silence to Finding the Black Girl Magic Within. In her memoir, Carol Tonge Mack takes us on a journey from a small town in Antigua to the streets of the South Bronx to private college life in New England to a career in academia.

February 27, 2:00 – 3:00pm, 465 Walter C. Langsam Library

The program will also include a book giveaway, cultural food favorites, spoken word poetry and student-shared study abroad experiences. The event is free and open to all.

________________________

Carol Tonge Mack is an accomplished leader in higher education. With nearly 20 years of experience, she has a longstanding commitment to mentoring and graduating scores of students, creating innovative strategies for success, empowering women to lead regardless of their position and collaborating with community stakeholders.

Currently, Carol is an assistant dean at the University of Cincinnati with the College of Arts and Sciences (A&S). For the past six years, she served as the college conduct administrator for academic misconduct and works collaboratively with the Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards.  She is the co-founder of the University of Cincinnati’s Black Women on the Move, an employee resource group designed to create systematic and holistic changes university-wide to support and empower Black female staff members. Carol also built the university’s first Cultural Competence Workshop Series for the academic advising staff in the College of Arts and Sciences.

And don’t miss – a table display featuring African-American authors and poets on display on the 4th floor of Langsam Library.

 

The Kennedy Letter

By: Alex Temple, Gettler Project Archivist

I’ve been lost in the archives, and finally found my way out!  I’ve actually been taking some time to look at the collection as a whole, and have been eager to get back into looking at some of the contents at a closer level.  One piece which caught my attention early on was a letter from none other than Robert F. Kennedy, from 1957.  I’ve been excited to dig into this and learn more about the people in the letter and circumstances surrounding it.

Letter from Robert F. Kennedy to Benjamin Gettler regarding the Hoffa case

Continue reading The Kennedy Letter

March 6 Life of the Mind lecture to once again address the topic of “Next”

life of the mind graphicLife of the Mind, interdisciplinary conversations with UC faculty, will return Wednesday, March 6, 2019 from 2:30-4:30pm, in TUC 400B with a lecture by Stephen Meyer, professor of musicology in the College-Conservatory of Music. Professor Meyer will speak on “Beyond Decanonization: The Future of Humanities in the Neoliberal University.”

Life of the Mind is a semi-annual lecture series that features a distinguished University of Cincinnati faculty member presenting his or her work and expertise. The series includes intriguing insights from diverse perspectives and encourages faculty and students from across the university to engage in further discourse. The presentation is not simply a recitation of the faculty member’s work but promotes an informed point of view.

Stephen Meyer specializes in early 19th-century opera, film music, music history pedagogy, music and medievalism and the history of recorded sound. He is the editor-in-chief of the Journal of Music History Pedagogy.

stephen meyer
Stephen Meyer

Meyer’s presentation will build on his recently published work on transformations in the canon of works that served as the core of the music history curriculum for much of the 20th century. The hegemony of this canon — formed almost exclusively from the works of white, male composers — was challenged and at least partially deconstructed during the 1980s and ’90s. During these years, musicology was enriched by new critical approaches and methodologies that exposed the relationship between the historical canon and contemporary power structures. Ethnomusicology and popular music studies made new repertoires the subject of serious scholarly work, and the field seemed poised for a period of rapid expansion. And yet this expansion — at least insofar as it might be measured by an increase in the number of tenure-track positions allotted to musicology in North American universities — failed to materialize.

In this sense, what might be called the “de-institutionalization” of musicology participates in the so-called “crisis of the humanities”: the seemingly inexorable shift of resources away from the humanities and towards supposedly more profitable and applicable disciplines. Meyer’s presentation will use musicology as a case example through which to ponder the ways in which the humanities might reposition themselves in a post-canonic, multi-cultural and transformational society.

A panel of four UC faculty members will respond to and discuss the lecture from diverse perspectives. The March 6 Life of the Mind panel will consist of:

  • Alberto Espay, professor of neurology, College of Medicine
  • James Mack, professor of chemistry, College of Arts and Sciences, associate dean, The Graduate School
  • Tamika Odum, assistant professor, behavioral sciences, UC Blue Ash College
  • Rebecca Williamson, associate professor, architecture and interior design, College of Design, Architecture, Art and Planning

Sponsored by the Office of the Senior Vice President and Provost, and organized by the University of Cincinnati Libraries and Faculty Senate, the mission of Life of the Mind is to celebrate UC faculty research, scholarship and creative output and to foster the free and open exchange of ideas and discourse. Life of the Mind is free and open to the public and attracts a broad audience including UC students, faculty, staff and alumni, as well as people from the community.

More information about Life of the Mind is available online at www.libraries.uc.edu/lifeofthemind/.

________________________________________

To continue the conversation on humanities and higher education, attend the Taft Center Lecture “Humanities Education at the Crossroads: Why the Liberal Arts are Fundamental to Democracy” presented by William Egginton, Thursday, March 7 at 3:00p.m.

UC Black Women on the Move and UC Libraries Co-Sponsoring “Sister Speak Published Edition” Feb. 21

Come out Thursday, Feb. 21, 6-8pm, at the African American Cultural & Resource Center and be inspired by the stories of black women authors as they share insight on their journey to becoming published.  This event is free and open to the public. This event is sponsored by UC Black Women on the Move and the University of Cincinnati Libraries.  To RSVP, or for more information, contact Ewaniki Moore-Hawkins at mooreek@ucmail.uc.edu.

Light refreshments will be served.  The panelists’ books will be available for purchase.

Sister Speak flyer

 

 

Berg Fashion Library

Fashion Design Students!

Please check out the Berg Fashion Library

Its amazing features include:

  • Reference works including the 10-volume Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion, A–Z of Fashion, and The Dictionary of Fashion History
  • More than 100 academic eBooks
  • An invaluable museum directory
  • Over 13,000 color images from prestigious partners such as the Costume Institute at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Victoria and Albert Museum, the Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology, Mode Museum, and the Commercial Pattern Archive
  • Unique exhibition archive, which showcases images from historic exhibitions from museums around the world, including the Museum at Fashion Institute of Technology and Somerset House

 

The Bizarre Valentine Postcards of R.F. Outcault

By:  Kevin Grace

Postcard showing little boy crying and dogs looking onThe children are either drawn as freckle-faced street urchins or as the clean-smocked offspring of the hoity-toity.  The animals – a parrot, typically dogs – look on quizzically or crack wise.  And the occasion being Valentine’s Day, the messages are about the lovelorn and the hopeful.  These are the early 20th century postcards drawn by Richard Felton Outcault, a pioneer of the modern newspaper comic strip who gave America such literary figures as Buster Brown and The Yellow Kid.   And advertising being Richard Felton Outcaultwhat it was (and is), Buster and the Kid gave us books, shoes, coin banks, calendars, clocks, pencils, puzzles, and all manner of geegaws, selling the country on the all-American pastime of buying stuff.

But the postcards deviated from the overall merchandising a bit, although Outcault’s newspaper employers and their agents certainly generated a lot of them.  The holiday cards were something a little different, a reflection of the artist’s own attitudes to his comic Postcard showing girl kissing boy with the words, "O! Will I be your Valentine?creations.  R.F. Outcault was born in 1863, hailing from Lancaster, Ohio.  He came to Cincinnati in 1878 to attend the McMicken School of Design – which is now the Cincinnati Art Academy, though the University of Cincinnati certainly traces part of its heritage as well to the McMicken school, so in effect Outcault is a UC alumnus.  He graduated in 1881 and began his employment as a painter of bucolic scenes in the massive safes constructed by the Hall Safe and Lock Company.  Growing in local reputation, Outcault managed to land a job with the 1888 centennial industrial exposition in Cincinnati, one of the many local product fairs held in the 19th century, and which were begun as an outlet of the Ohio Mechanics Institute, founded in Child asking for a Valentine with parrot looking on1828 and now part of the University of Cincinnati’s College of Engineering and Applied Science.  At the exposition he painted scenes for Thomas Edison’s electric light displays, parlaying that into a career on the east coast with trade magazines.  Incidentally, while Edison was a telegraph operator in 1860s Cincinnati, he frequented the OMI library for his reading pleasure.

By 1894, Outcault was drawing cartoons for newspapers and magazines, particularly the New Postcard with the words "This is February 14" showing a girl and a dogYork World, the New York Journal, Judge, and the New York Herald.  It was during this time that he created his first famous character of his “Hogan’s Alley” cartoon, the Yellow Kid.  By 1902, R.F. introduced his famous Buster Brown and his faithful terrier, Tige.  And, his personal style of using panels and dialogue balloons became a standard in cartooning.

A boy in uniform giving a girl a Valentine's cardBut those strange Valentine cards?  They are unlike the sweet and lovey-dovey kids’ valentines of the late 20th century.  Instead, there is an edge to Outcault’s art, a bit of an insult here and there, and more rejection than true love.  In a way, they are an outgrowth of the so-called “Vinegar Valentines” of Victorian America.  Vinegar valentines Postcard with a girl and boy and the words "I adore you"were sarcastic and insulting, greetings designed to reject the offers of true love.  Competing with true romantic valentines, these little missives of misanthropy usually were sent anonymously to those one disliked, be they flirtatious bachelors or suffragists.   Outcault’s cards resemble them in a natural progression, one supposes, from invective to just strange little takes on the whole idea of Valentine’s Day.

Postcard with the words, "I'm thinking, thinking all the time. Of my heart's best love, my valentine." Showing young man and dogFor R.F. Outcault, his valentine postcards were done in his typical style and represent another aspect of what was a long and productive cartooning career.  Retiring from the hubbub of daily newspaper work, he spent the last decade of his life quietly painting and died in 1928.

 

A Jacobite Jukebox: Historical Narratives Preserved in Song

By: McKenna Corey, ARB Intern

It was hard for me to really conceptualize the true narrative power of song until I was reorganizing the Virginius C. Hall Jacobite Collection this week. As I was arranging a stack of books, I saw one that caught my eye. The spine read: The Scottish Jacobites and Their Songs and Music. Written in 1899 by Thomas Newbigging, the book recounts in detail not only the history of the Jacobite movements, but also their rich musical history.

Cover of Scottish Jacobites by Thomas NewbiggingThough I’ve never really had any musical talent (except some early experiences with the recorder), I thought it might be interesting to pursue some further research on the topic. Sure enough, there were further resources on the musical stylings of the Jacobites, and I decided to dig in! Though in this post I’ll only be referencing Newbigging’s book,  I’ll include a reading list of some other books I found here at the ARB that focus on the Jacobites’ music and song.

As I read further into Newbigging’s analysis of the songs, I realized how truly important music was to the Jacobites as they pursued their quest to return King James II and VII to the throne, and restore the power of the monarchy to the House of Stuart. The Jacobites were steadfast in their goals; they believed that James’ removal from power was an illegal move, and that he was their rightful ruler. Though the Jacobites were ultimately unsuccessful in their attempts to restore the House of Stuart, their music lives on and preserves their history.

This music served a variety of purposes. Some songs were poetic battle cries that motivated the Jacobites to pursue their goals, some were sad ruminations upon those that were lost, and some took a darkly humorous outlook on a seemingly hopeless situation. Regardless of their intended purposes, these Jacobite songs are poignant reflections on this period in history, including not only the Jacobites’ story, but their spirit. These songs are performed even today. I wanted to pick out a few of my favorites from Newbigging’s book, and include some audio so you can listen to them too! I didn’t think I’d be spending my week listening to bagpipes, but I can’t say I’m upset about it; rather, I’ve been pleasantly surprised at how much I enjoyed it. Continue reading A Jacobite Jukebox: Historical Narratives Preserved in Song

New Acquisitions-DAAP Library Special Collections

A new shipment of concrete poetry books has arrived in the Robert A. Deshon and Karl J. Schlachter Library for Design, Architecture, Art and Planning (DAAP). Titles by John M. Bennett, Jim Leftwich, Robin Crozier, César Figueiredo, Serge Segay and others.

Make an appointment with Interim DAAP Library Head Elizabeth Meyer or librarian Andrea Chemero to view them.

Photo of concrete poetry book cover Wave by John M. Bennett
Wave, by John M. Bennett
"Ripening of Meat," a poem from Co-Labor-ative Writing
“Ripening of Meat,” a poem from Co-Labor-ative Writing
Co-Labor-ative Writing by Editor Luigi-Bob Drake, cover photo
Various titles from new acquisitions.
New acquisitions.

 

Workshop on Text mining HathiTrust Resources with python

 

 

 

 

 

Eleanor Dickson Koehl, digital scholarship librarian with the HathiTrust will visit UC Libraries to give a presentation on the HathiTrust Research Center and conduct a workshop on text mining using HathiTrust Resources and python.  The talk will be Tuesday Feb 26th from 3- 4 pm and the workshop will be Wednesday Morning from 9am -12pm with a luncheon afterwards from 12 pm-1 pm.  Please join for one or both events which will be held in the Vis Lab 240H Braunstein Hall – inside the Geology-Math and Physics Library.  These events are free and open to all.  We request that attendees of the text mining workshop complete registration through the faculty one stop system.

For more information please refer to the DCS2 Word flyer_hathi_2019.