John McDonough–Reminiscences

Back in late November, the Winkler Center was sad to the share the news of John “Jack” McDonough’s passing.  After that post, several friends of the Winkler Center, and current and former advisory board members shared with us some reminiscences of their friend and colleague. With their permission we’ve reprinted a few below.

McDonough with Marianne Ivey

Marianne Ivey: I was very sad to hear of the passing of Dr. Jack McDonough. He was extremely important to the Henry R. Winkler Center for the History of the Health Professions in several ways, and I was lucky to experience his leadership, and influence, first hand.

As chair of the Winkler Center Advisory Board, Jack was a passionate fundraiser for the Center. He was very successful in sharing the important mission of the Center with his UC School of Medicine colleagues. Not only did he have ideas, but was also proactive in supporting activities that shared the important legacies of those talented UC colleagues. Jack was adept at involving other members of the UC healthcare community in the Winkler Center. Along with Jane Henney, MD, former Senior Vice President and Provost for Health Affairs, the Profressons of pharmacy, nursing and allied health were invited to be full participants. When Jack left Cincinnati I became chair of the Center. He was very generous in sharing his materials and ideas with me.  His example is being emulated still and I think he would be happy with that legacy

L to R, William Camm, Edward Otten, Jack McDonough

William Camm: I’ve known Jack McDonough for at least 45 yrs. I remember when he was a surgical resident when I was a college student working for Dr Altemeier insurgical bacteriology. Jack was then an instructor and teacher in surgery when I was a medical student. His surgical knowledge and technical skills were among the best I have ever seen. He was always so kind and helpful to medical students.  He recruited me to join the Winkler Center Advisory Board and I had hoped to interview him as part of our video interviews of past great clinicians. I’ve modeled all my interviews based on reviewing the great one’s Jack did (Drs. Helmsworth, Neale and Martin to name a few). He was the consummate gentleman and the best hand surgeon I’ve ever known. I will certainly miss him.

Dan Lucas: Wholeheartedly agree on the importance of Dr. McDonough.  Not only was he a gem of a person, but he kept the Winkler Center alive during a tenuous period when its current location was very much in jeopardy.  His passing is a huge loss.

Stephen Marine: Jack’s biggest accomplishment [as chair of the Winkler Center advisory board] was getting the Center named for Henry [Winkler], which he accomplished just a year or two before Henry died. I think when discussing his work for the Winkler Center, you also need to consider his marshaling of the board, at the time, to increase its fund raising role in addition to its advisory duties.  He tirelessly worked for increases in gift giving with an emphasis on endowments and leveraged his community contacts to bring greater visibility to the Center. Finally, he brought much needed diversity to the Winkler Center board in just about any way you can imagine. Jack always worked hand in glove with me and others at the Center but never interfered in operational matters.

Henry Winkler and Jack McDonough at the Winkler Centers Dedication, March 25, 2009

 

 

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John McDonough, MD

It is with great sadness that the Winkler Center reports the passing of John “Jack” McDonough. He died unexpectedly at his home in Tenants Harbor, Maine on November 7th. He was 77. Dr. McDonough was known for many things, but as chair of the Winkler Center’s advisory board he worked tirelessly on, and was a driving force behind, a number of successful initiatives. It was under his chairmanship that the Center for the History of the Health Professions was named for then UC president emeritus Henry R. Winkler. Dr. McDonough marshaled the advisory board to increase its fundraising role in addition to it advisory duties. He oversaw and encouraged increases in gift giving during his tenure with an emphasis on endowments for the Winkler Center. In addition, through his community contacts, he brought greater visibility to the Center and worked hard to truly diversify the advisory board.  He oversaw the Winkler Center’s move from Wherry Hall to the Medical Sciences Building.  And finally, he reinvigorated what has become a cornerstone of the Winkler Center and that is its over forty-year-old oral history program. “I’m saddened and shocked…Jack work[ed] hand in glove with me and others but never interfered in operational matters…he was a great guy and will be missed” remembered associate dean emeritus and former executive director of the Winkler Center, Steve Marine.

Dr. McDonough’s passion for medical history and the Winkler Center is now remembered with the likes of Saul Benison and Cecil Striker. It is the Winkler Center’s desire to everyday live up to the legacy he helped to establish.

The below statement was sent out by the Dean of the College of Medicine, Andrew Filak Jr., MD. on November 11th.

McDonough with Henry Winkler at the Center’s naming ceremony in 2009

 

Dr. McDonough was known for his integrity, professionalism, excellent technical skills and his patience and enthusiasm in teaching surgical residents. He received his medical degree from the College of Medicine in 1968. Besides his two years of military service in the U.S. Navy as a Lieutenant Commander and a yearlong fellowship, he spent his entire surgical career at UC. He joined the faculty as an assistant professor in 1975, became an associate professor in 1982 and then an associate professor emeritus in 2012.

A native of Cincinnati, Dr. McDonough completed his internship and surgical training at UC from 1968 until 1975. He then served in the U.S. Navy for two years, including a year aboard the aircraft carrier U.S.S. Constellation and teaching surgery at the Naval Medical Center San Diego. Dr. McDonough would spend another 14 years in military reserves. He joined the College of Medicine faculty after completing a fellowship in hand surgery at the University of Louisville in 1978.

Considered one of the region’s premier hand surgeons, Dr. McDonough was dedicated throughout his career to medical education. He served as General Surgery Residency Program Director from 1979 until 1986 and as a post-graduate education adviser from 1978 until his retirement in 2011. He was president of the Mont Reid Surgical Society from 1991 until 1994 and had been a member of that society for more than 35 years.

Dr. McDonough also served as a member of the University of Cincinnati Foundation Board for more than 15 years. He received the Foundation’s Trustee Award in 1995. He also served as president of the College of Medicine Alumni Association from 1994 until 1996. He endowed a Visiting Professorship in the Department of Surgery in honor of his parents.

 

McDonough speaking at the opening of the Center for the History of Health Professions and the Donald C. Harrison Health Sciences Library’s new space in the CARE/Crawley Building, November 2008

In 2012 the UC Board of Trustees approved naming the John J. McDonough, MD, Foyer in the Winkler Center for the History of the Health Professions. Dr. McDonough was dedicated to promoting the medical history of the college, UC Medical Center, university and Cincinnati community through his involvement with the Winkler Center. He joined the center’s Advisory Board in 1990 and served as chair from 2006 until 2013. It was through his efforts that the center, which was previously known as the UC Medical Heritage Center, was in 2009 named in honor of Henry Winkler, PhD. Dr. Winkler was chair of the center’s Advisory Board for 20 years and was president of the University of Cincinnati from 1977 until 1984.

Making use of his strong dexterity as a hand surgeon, Dr. McDonough was an avid miniature ship builder with a dedicated workshop in his home in Maine. When living in Cincinnati he also was very active with The Literary Club of Cincinnati. Dr. McDonough is survived by his wife, Barbara Aras. Following his wishes, there will be no service. Donations in his memory can be made to one of Dr. McDonough’s favorite projects, a K-8 school in an under-served community: St. George MSU Building Fund, 65 Main Street, Tenants Harbor, Maine 04860.

 

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Albert Sabin Notebook Digitization Project Closing Events

Karen Torghele and Larry Anderson field questions from the audience after their presentation

Thursday evening, October 10, 2019, the Henry R. Winkler Center for the History of the Health Professions hosted the first in a series of lectures that will bring to a close a multi-year project to digitize portions of Albert B. Sabin’s laboratory notebooks. The project was funded by The John Hauck Foundation, Fifth Third Bank, John W. Hauck, Narley L. Haley, Co-Trustees. Over the course of two years the Winkler Center saw to the digitization of over 40 notebooks consisting of approximately 6000 pages. These notebooks were all uploaded to the University of Cincinnati’s online repository, Scholar@UC and are all keyword searchable PDFs. We know this will be an incredible boon to Sabin and polio history researchers, and virologists worldwide.

The gift to the Winkler Center also allowed the repository to revamp its Hauck Center for the Albert B. Sabin Archives online exhibit and website. The new site will roll out the week of October 14-18 and is now more accessible to a wider and diverse array of users than ever before.

Presenters at the October 10th event, Karen Torghele and Larry Anderson MD, combined stories of Sabin’s early academic career with examples of his meticulous research skills and how the former fed the latter. Dr. Anderson showed two sections of Sabin’s notebooks where Sabin identified for the first time the virus strains that would go into his oral polio vaccine a few years later. What a moment!

A reception followed the presentation along with the opening of Sabin and Chumakov Surmounting the Impossible: Cold War Collaboration in the Defeat of Polio, an exhibit detailing the life-long friendship and professional comradery of Albert B. Sabin and Mikail Petrovich Chumakov.  It was Sabin’s work with Soviet scientist Chumakov that led to the oral polio vaccine’s first use and success in the Soviet Union. It was only from that success that the vaccine was approved and distributed in the United States.

Over the next several weeks the Winkler Center will host three more Sabin related lectures. These will all be held in the Stanley J. Lucas MD Boardroom between 12 and 1PM. A light lunch will be provided. See below for speakers, dates, and presentation titles.

Dr. David Bernstein

Thursday, October 17, 2019

12-1PM, Stanley J. Lucas Boardroom

Dr. David Bernstein: Developing a Vaccine from Sabin to Rotarix

Dr. David Bernstein has been at CCHMC for over 35 years and rose through the ranks of assistant, associate and full professor to become the infectious disease division director in 2000. His tenure as division director saw a rapid rise in research, training and clinical care. Dr. Bernstein’s interest is primarily in the field of vaccinology and virology. Over the past 30 years he has contributed to the development of several vaccines; most notable rotavirus, norovirus, herpes viruses and influenza and he has published over 300 manuscripts in this field. The rotavirus vaccine now marketed as Rotarix around the world was first developed by Dr. Bernstein and his colleague Dr. Richard Ward. He has also been actively involved in the clinical evaluation of vaccines for several STIs including HSV, CMV, and HPV, agents of bioterrorism including small pox and anthrax, and many childhood vaccines. He has been the PI of one of the NIH funded Vaccine Treatment Evaluation Units (VTEUs) for over 15 years and has led several large studies in adolescents. His international recognition as a vaccinologist has contributed to the outstanding reputation of the Infectious Diseases Division of CCHMC.

Dr. Paul Spearman

Thursday, October 31, 2019

12-1PM, Stanley J. Lucas Boardroom

Dr. Paul Spearman: Ebola Virus Outbreaks and Current Vaccine Approaches

Paul Spearman, MD is the Albert B. Sabin Professor and Director of Infectious Diseases at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. His laboratory studies fundamental aspects of HIV biology and develops new vaccines for human pathogens. HIV assembly processes are a major focus of the laboratory, including the trafficking of the HIV envelope glycoprotein and its interaction with essential host factors. A related project studies how HIV interacts with macrophages and microglia. Dr. Spearman and his colleagues in the CCHMC Vaccine and Treatment Evaluation Unit (VTEU) are engaged in the design and performance of clinical trials for new vaccines in adults and children, with a special interest in employing cutting-edge technologies to define innate and adaptive immune responses to vaccines. Dr. Spearman is currently leading trials for Ebola and avian influenza vaccine development.

Dr. Spearman serves on the Board of Scientific Counselors for NCI, the Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee for the FDA, and is President of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society (PIDS). Beyond his research interests, Dr. Spearman is a Pediatric ID clinician and enjoys caring for children and mentoring future leaders in Infectious Diseases.

Dr. Robert Frenck

Tuesday, November 5, 2019

12-1PM Stanley J. Lucas Boardroom

Dr. Robert W. Frenck, Jr.: Vaccines and the Ongoing Legacy of Dr. Sabin: An Ounce of Prevention is Better Than a Pound of Cure!

Robert W Frenck, Jr, M.D. is a Professor of Pediatrics in the Division of Infectious Diseases and the Executive Chair of the IRB at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. Dr Frenck received his BA from the University of Calif at San Diego and his M.D. from the Univ of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHSC). He completed a pediatric residency at the National Naval Medical Center and a fellowship in Pediatric Infectious Diseases at UTHSC. Dr Frenck has been a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Committee on Infectious Diseases (Red Book Committee) as well as on the Executive Committee of the AAP Section on Infectious Diseases (SOID) and Chair of the SOID Education Committee. He has published over 100 articles in the peer reviewed literature with a focus on infectious diseases and vaccines.

 

We are again indebted to The Hauck Foundation for this generous gift that has funded not only a digitization project and website face-lift, but also this incredible lecture series. Please plan to attend one of the remaining events they are sure to be intellectually stimulating and thoughtful discussions.

 

 

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Presenting the Albert B. Sabin Research Notebook Digitization Project Lecture Series

albert sabinDr. Albert B. Sabin, developer of the oral polio vaccine, donated his complete correspondence, laboratory materials, manuscripts, awards and medals to the University of Cincinnati. His papers document both the development and testing of the oral polio vaccine and the growth of virology as a discipline.

In 1995, the John Hauck Foundation helped the Cincinnati Medical Heritage Center (now the Henry R. Winkler Center for the History of the Health Professions) establish the Hauck Center for the Albert B. Sabin Archives. An initial gift provided funds for an archivist to organize and preserve Dr. Sabin’s collection. Later, the Hauck Foundation provided the Winkler Center with two additional donations that helped with the construction of the Winkler Center’s new home and the building of the John Hauck Foundation Gallery in the space.

Recently, selections of the Albert B. Sabin Papers Laboratory Notebooks were digitized with another gift from the John Hauck Foundation. The digitized materials were added to UC’s online repository, Scholar@UC available at https://scholar.uc.edu/ (search “Sabin Notebooks”). The physical collection of laboratory notebooks holds the entirety of Sabin’s laboratory work during his time at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Research Foundation and the University of Cincinnati (1935 to 1969), including his service to the United States during World War II.

To close and celebrate this most recent project, the Winkler Center will produce a series of lectures dealing with Sabin, his research and the field of virology. Continue reading Presenting the Albert B. Sabin Research Notebook Digitization Project Lecture Series

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Read Source to learn more about the news, events, people and happenings in UC Libraries.

sourceRead Source, the online newsletter, to learn more about the news, events, people and happenings in UC Libraries.

In this issue of Source, Dean Xuemao Wang writes about his new role as vice provost for digital scholarship, which ties in with the article Introducing the Research @ Data Services Team.

The Libraries special collections are featured prominently in this issue with news of an exciting, surprise gift to the Neil Armstrong Commemorative Archives, promotion of a lecture series celebrating the digitization of the Albert B. Sabin Research Notebooks, and an announcement of a new UC exhibit featuring the Special Collections of four UC Libraries.

This fall brings new faces and new publications from the University of Cincinnati Press, along with the conclusion of the university’s Bicentennial celebration, which university archivist and head of the Archives and Rare Books Library Kevin Grace uses as the occasion to recount a gift from William A. Procter that was instrumental to the libraries.

Lastly, we announce that the Cecil Striker Society Annual Lecture is now our first fully endowed annual lecture.

Read these articles, as well as past issues, on the web at http://libapps.libraries.uc.edu/source/ and via e-mail. To receive Source via e-mail, contact melissa.norris@uc.edu to be added to the mailing list.

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Welcome, Melissa Previtera, Health Sciences Library/Winkler Center Academic & Research Services Specialist

On Tuesday, Sept. 3, Melissa Previtera began her position at the University of Cincinnati Libraries as the academic and research services specialist for the Donald C. Harrison Health Sciences Library (HSL) and the Henry R. Winkler Center for the History of the Health Professions (Winkler Center).

Melissa is a familiar face in UC Libraries having worked previously in the HSL/Winkler Center, College of Engineering and Applied Science Library, and most recently at the College of Education, Criminal Justice and Human Services Library. In this new role, she will work closely with HSL and Winkler Center faculty as well as members of the Winkler Center Board, College of Medicine, College of Nursing, College of Pharmacy and Allied Health faculty, researchers, staff and students.

Welcome (back), Melissa!

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Announcing the Redesigned UC Libraries Website

redesigned libraries homepage

Check out the redesigned Libraries website scheduled to launch Thursday, Aug. 15.

Some of the new features and upgrades of the UC Libraries website redesign include:

  • updated look and feel and an uncluttered homepage
  • refreshed, user-centric content under the categories of: “Find, Request, Borrow,” “Special Collections,” “Research and Teaching Support,” “Spaces and Technology,” “About” and “My Accounts”
  • tabbed search box located prominently front and center at the top of the homepage, allowing users to search for articles, books, journals and databases much more quickly and easily
  • ability to search Research Guides by subject via the homepage
  • call-outs for Special Collections, Digital Technologies & Innovation and Library as Place
  • library news and links to information such as the Strategic Plan, Progress Report, Staff Directory and more.

Included in the redesign are all college and departmental (C&D) library web pages from the Archives to Rare Books Library to the Henry R. Winkler Center for the History of the Health Professions, as well as the Clermont College Library and UC Blue Ash College Library web pages.

While the starting web address of the site remains the same – www.libraries.uc.edu, the navigation and content within the site has changed, so update any links or bookmarks you may have to the site. And while great care was taken to be accurate, if broken links or missing content are discovered, contact Team Dynamix.

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NIH Data and Open Science Expert to Present Lecture and Workshop on September 17, 2019

Image of Dr. Lisa Federer
Dr. Lisa Federer, PhD, MLIS

Join UC Libraries and IT@UC for a lecture on the reuse of biomedical research data and a workshop on data visualization in R.

On September 17th, Dr. Lisa Federer, Data and Open Science Librarian for the National Library of Medicine, will visit UC as part of our Data and Computational Science Series (DCS2).

The DCS2 planning committee cordially invites you to attend Dr. Federer’s lecture, luncheon and workshop.

Lecture and Luncheon:

If You Share It, Will They Come? Quantifying and Characterizing Reuse of Biomedical Research Data
Tuesday, September 17, 2019 11:00 AM to 1:00 PM
Henry R. Winkler Center for the History of the Health Professions, Stanley J. Lucas, MD Board Room.

Workshop:

Endless Forms Most Beautiful: Creating Customized Data Visualization with ggplot2 in R
Tuesday, September 17, 2019 1:30 PM to 3:30 PM
Donald C. Harrison Health Sciences Library, Dr. Stanley B. Troup Learning Space.

These events are free and open to all. Registration is required.

Register for the Lecture and LuncheonRegister for the Workshop.

Please be sure to log into the Faculty Development OneStop website to complete your registration.

Registration also permitted via phone and email | (513) 558-0725 | Don.Jason@uc.edu

These events are funded through a universal provider grant awarded by the Provost Office.

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Attending Wednesday’s Cecil Striker Lecture? Stay for a Book Signing of “Leaving a Legacy: Lessons from the Writings of Daniel Drake.”

leaving a legacy book coverThe Henry R. Winkler Center for the History of the Health Professions and the Cecil Striker Society for the History of Medicine will host the 10th Cecil Striker Society Annual Lecture from 5:00-7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, May 15, in the Kresge Auditorium, Medical Sciences Building, 231 Albert Sabin Way.

This year’s lecture, titled Daniel Drake’s Connection to Sir William Osler: Celebrating Two Medical Education Reformers, will focus on the immense impact both physicians had on medical education. Philip M. Diller, M.D., Ph.D., and Robert E. Rakel, M.D., will serve as co-lecturers for the event.

Following the lecture, author Philip M. Diller will be on hand outside the Winkler Center to sign copies of his recently published book, Leaving a Legacy: Lessons from the Writings of Daniel Drake.

As documented here in his own words from excerpts of lectures, personal journal entries, presentations, speeches, books and letters to his children, readers learn about the scope of Daniel Drake’s accomplishments in medicine, contributions to his community, and dedication to his family. Diller goes beyond biography to contextualize Drake’s life choices and what makes him a role model for today’s physicians. Diller selected 180 thematically arranged excerpts, which he paired with original reflection questions to guide the reader through thought-provoking prompts.

Leaving a Legacy was published by the University of Cincinnati Press.

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Cecil Striker Society Annual Lecture Scheduled for May 15 to Celebrate Two Pioneers in Medical Education

cecil striker invite

The Henry R. Winkler Center for the History of the Health Professions and the Cecil Striker Society for the History of Medicine will host the 10th Cecil Striker Society Annual Lecture from 5:00-7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, May 15, in the Kresge Auditorium, Medical Sciences Building, 231 Albert Sabin Way.

This year’s lecture, titled Daniel Drake’s Connection to Sir William Osler: Celebrating Two Medical Education Reformers, will focus on the immense impact both physicians had on medical education. Philip M. Diller, M.D., Ph.D., and Robert E. Rakel, M.D., will serve as co-lecturers for the event. Continue reading Cecil Striker Society Annual Lecture Scheduled for May 15 to Celebrate Two Pioneers in Medical Education

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