John McDonough–Reminiscences

Back in late November, the Winkler Center was sad to the share the news of John “Jack” McDonough’s passing.  After that post, several friends of the Winkler Center, and current and former advisory board members shared with us some reminiscences of their friend and colleague. With their permission we’ve reprinted a few below.

McDonough with Marianne Ivey

Marianne Ivey: I was very sad to hear of the passing of Dr. Jack McDonough. He was extremely important to the Henry R. Winkler Center for the History of the Health Professions in several ways, and I was lucky to experience his leadership, and influence, first hand.

As chair of the Winkler Center Advisory Board, Jack was a passionate fundraiser for the Center. He was very successful in sharing the important mission of the Center with his UC School of Medicine colleagues. Not only did he have ideas, but was also proactive in supporting activities that shared the important legacies of those talented UC colleagues. Jack was adept at involving other members of the UC healthcare community in the Winkler Center. Along with Jane Henney, MD, former Senior Vice President and Provost for Health Affairs, the Profressons of pharmacy, nursing and allied health were invited to be full participants. When Jack left Cincinnati I became chair of the Center. He was very generous in sharing his materials and ideas with me.  His example is being emulated still and I think he would be happy with that legacy

L to R, William Camm, Edward Otten, Jack McDonough

William Camm: I’ve known Jack McDonough for at least 45 yrs. I remember when he was a surgical resident when I was a college student working for Dr Altemeier insurgical bacteriology. Jack was then an instructor and teacher in surgery when I was a medical student. His surgical knowledge and technical skills were among the best I have ever seen. He was always so kind and helpful to medical students.  He recruited me to join the Winkler Center Advisory Board and I had hoped to interview him as part of our video interviews of past great clinicians. I’ve modeled all my interviews based on reviewing the great one’s Jack did (Drs. Helmsworth, Neale and Martin to name a few). He was the consummate gentleman and the best hand surgeon I’ve ever known. I will certainly miss him.

Dan Lucas: Wholeheartedly agree on the importance of Dr. McDonough.  Not only was he a gem of a person, but he kept the Winkler Center alive during a tenuous period when its current location was very much in jeopardy.  His passing is a huge loss.

Stephen Marine: Jack’s biggest accomplishment [as chair of the Winkler Center advisory board] was getting the Center named for Henry [Winkler], which he accomplished just a year or two before Henry died. I think when discussing his work for the Winkler Center, you also need to consider his marshaling of the board, at the time, to increase its fund raising role in addition to its advisory duties.  He tirelessly worked for increases in gift giving with an emphasis on endowments and leveraged his community contacts to bring greater visibility to the Center. Finally, he brought much needed diversity to the Winkler Center board in just about any way you can imagine. Jack always worked hand in glove with me and others at the Center but never interfered in operational matters.

Henry Winkler and Jack McDonough at the Winkler Centers Dedication, March 25, 2009

 

 

John McDonough, MD

It is with great sadness that the Winkler Center reports the passing of John “Jack” McDonough. He died unexpectedly at his home in Tenants Harbor, Maine on November 7th. He was 77. Dr. McDonough was known for many things, but as chair of the Winkler Center’s advisory board he worked tirelessly on, and was a driving force behind, a number of successful initiatives. It was under his chairmanship that the Center for the History of the Health Professions was named for then UC president emeritus Henry R. Winkler. Dr. McDonough marshaled the advisory board to increase its fundraising role in addition to it advisory duties. He oversaw and encouraged increases in gift giving during his tenure with an emphasis on endowments for the Winkler Center. In addition, through his community contacts, he brought greater visibility to the Center and worked hard to truly diversify the advisory board.  He oversaw the Winkler Center’s move from Wherry Hall to the Medical Sciences Building.  And finally, he reinvigorated what has become a cornerstone of the Winkler Center and that is its over forty-year-old oral history program. “I’m saddened and shocked…Jack work[ed] hand in glove with me and others but never interfered in operational matters…he was a great guy and will be missed” remembered associate dean emeritus and former executive director of the Winkler Center, Steve Marine.

Dr. McDonough’s passion for medical history and the Winkler Center is now remembered with the likes of Saul Benison and Cecil Striker. It is the Winkler Center’s desire to everyday live up to the legacy he helped to establish.

The below statement was sent out by the Dean of the College of Medicine, Andrew Filak Jr., MD. on November 11th.

McDonough with Henry Winkler at the Center’s naming ceremony in 2009

 

Dr. McDonough was known for his integrity, professionalism, excellent technical skills and his patience and enthusiasm in teaching surgical residents. He received his medical degree from the College of Medicine in 1968. Besides his two years of military service in the U.S. Navy as a Lieutenant Commander and a yearlong fellowship, he spent his entire surgical career at UC. He joined the faculty as an assistant professor in 1975, became an associate professor in 1982 and then an associate professor emeritus in 2012.

A native of Cincinnati, Dr. McDonough completed his internship and surgical training at UC from 1968 until 1975. He then served in the U.S. Navy for two years, including a year aboard the aircraft carrier U.S.S. Constellation and teaching surgery at the Naval Medical Center San Diego. Dr. McDonough would spend another 14 years in military reserves. He joined the College of Medicine faculty after completing a fellowship in hand surgery at the University of Louisville in 1978.

Considered one of the region’s premier hand surgeons, Dr. McDonough was dedicated throughout his career to medical education. He served as General Surgery Residency Program Director from 1979 until 1986 and as a post-graduate education adviser from 1978 until his retirement in 2011. He was president of the Mont Reid Surgical Society from 1991 until 1994 and had been a member of that society for more than 35 years.

Dr. McDonough also served as a member of the University of Cincinnati Foundation Board for more than 15 years. He received the Foundation’s Trustee Award in 1995. He also served as president of the College of Medicine Alumni Association from 1994 until 1996. He endowed a Visiting Professorship in the Department of Surgery in honor of his parents.

 

McDonough speaking at the opening of the Center for the History of Health Professions and the Donald C. Harrison Health Sciences Library’s new space in the CARE/Crawley Building, November 2008

In 2012 the UC Board of Trustees approved naming the John J. McDonough, MD, Foyer in the Winkler Center for the History of the Health Professions. Dr. McDonough was dedicated to promoting the medical history of the college, UC Medical Center, university and Cincinnati community through his involvement with the Winkler Center. He joined the center’s Advisory Board in 1990 and served as chair from 2006 until 2013. It was through his efforts that the center, which was previously known as the UC Medical Heritage Center, was in 2009 named in honor of Henry Winkler, PhD. Dr. Winkler was chair of the center’s Advisory Board for 20 years and was president of the University of Cincinnati from 1977 until 1984.

Making use of his strong dexterity as a hand surgeon, Dr. McDonough was an avid miniature ship builder with a dedicated workshop in his home in Maine. When living in Cincinnati he also was very active with The Literary Club of Cincinnati. Dr. McDonough is survived by his wife, Barbara Aras. Following his wishes, there will be no service. Donations in his memory can be made to one of Dr. McDonough’s favorite projects, a K-8 school in an under-served community: St. George MSU Building Fund, 65 Main Street, Tenants Harbor, Maine 04860.

 

Native Voices Children’s Programming Event a Success

Last week several UC Libraries (HSL, CECH, Langsam) collaborated to produce the first installment in our Native Voices: Native Peoples’ Concepts of Health and Illness public programming. This inaugural event focused specifically on children as Langsam Library received a visit from twenty-four students of the Arlitt Child & Family Research & Education Center. Cheryl Ghosh, Senior Librarian at UC’s CECH Library put together an amazing program of dramatic skits, activity stations, and multi-media fun.

First, the 3 to 5-year-olds were treated to an introduction and brief play about the Iroquois legend of the Three Sisters and its corresponding gardening tradition. This tradition of planting corn, beans and squash (the sisters) in close proximity is widespread among Native American farming. At the same time the story functions as a metaphor for supporting and helping one another.

After the skit, the children were divided into groups and each group moved on to an activity station. One group and its chaperones built a teepee. The other, shucked corn and picked beans from bean plants. After ten minutes the groups switched and tried the other activity.

After fifteen minutes of activities, the students had a brief snack then proceeded to the Student Technology Resource Center (STAC) where video was taken of them in front of a green screen. At that point the video was superimposed onto an image of the Great Plains and an American Indian village complete with moving buffalo.

Finally, as a parting gift, each child received the book D is for Drum: A Native American Alphabet by Debbie and Michael Shoulders and Irving Toddy. The event lasted approximately an hour and at no time did our worries of waning attention spans among the children materialize. They never once lost interest. A success, if we  do say so!  And a huge thanks to all who assisted.

Please plan to attend the Native Voices: Native American Concepts of Health and Illness opening event on Thursday, July 26th in the CARE/Crawley Atrium of the UC  Medical Sciences Building.  And stay tuned for the six weeks of supplementary programming the HSL has planned.

Please see the gallery below for more images of the event.

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Ira Abrahamson Jr., M.D.

Well, we lost another one. It is with sadness that we report the passing of our friend Dr. Ira Abrahamson, Jr. last Saturday, March 10.

At Ira’s home, June 2017

Personally, it is Dr. Abrahamson’s humor and amiability that I will remember most–so just a quick story before the more formal obituary, which I hope Ira would appreciate.

I had only been at the Winkler Center about two weeks when Dr. Abrahamson showed up with several family members to see his collection and the small exhibit we have on his life and career. I was nervous meeting my first Winkler Center donor, but he immediately set me at ease. He reminded me that the hand of his I had just shaken was a hand also shaken by two popes from whom he had received papal blessings (he had the photographs to prove it). He then tried to convince me that the blessings bestowed on him by those pontiffs now had been conferred on me. I said “if that’s the case, then give me your other hand so I can shake it…why leave anything to chance?” He laughed. I felt better. We would share jokes from that point forward whenever he would visit the Winkler bringing in more materials or just friends with whom to share his many accomplishments. We’ll miss him.

The following obituary was sent to all faculty/staff of the College of Medicine on Wednesday, March 14. It is reprinted here with permission from the UC College of Medicine Dean’s Office.

Dr. Abrahamson attended the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill on a swimming scholarship. He received his medical degree from the UC College of Medicine in 1948, as did his sister, Margaret, in 1946 and his son, Richard, in 1987. He completed his internship at Cincinnati General Hospital and his residency at the Illinois Eye and Ear Infirmary. He served for a year in the U.S. Coast Guard and then in the U.S. Army from 1951 to 1953 during the Korean War. Following military service, he returned to his native Cincinnati to practice with his father, Ira Abrahamson Sr., MD, who also was an ophthalmologist and on faculty at the College of Medicine.

A member of our faculty since 1964, Dr. Abrahamson rose to full professor before being named an emeritus professor in 2004.
Dr. Abrahamson became one of the first ophthalmic photographers in the world and invented several techniques to photograph the eye. Many of his images were used in his books on ophthalmology and eye care. He also traveled around the world lecturing, teaching and providing vision care to disadvantaged children.
Dr. Abrahamson received numerous honors in his lifetime, including the College of Medicine Distinguished Alumni Award in 2008 and the President’s Award of Excellence in 2014 from the University of Cincinnati. In 2001 he received the Distinguished Service Award from the University of North Carolina, and in 2000 he was named an Outstanding Philanthropist by Boston Children’s Hospital. He was inducted into the Medical Mission Hall of Fame in 2007 for his contributions to advancing the quality of life of others around the world. He even had audiences with three popes: Pius XII, Paul VI and John Paul II.

Dr. Abrahamson had a tremendous impact on vision care, education and research for more than 60 years. He worked tirelessly to eliminate preventable blindness in children, not only here in Cincinnati but around the world. In 1995, he created the Abrahamson Pediatric Eye Institute at Cincinnati Children’s. Working with the Cincinnati Rotary Club, the institute started the Vision Screening Program through Rotary International where 800 local chapters eventually joined in the program to detect vision problems in young children.

“Declaring that the street currently knowns as Shillito Place shall hereby receive the honorary secondary name of “Dr. Ira Abrahamson Way by legislative action of the May and City Council in honor…” Dr. Abrahamson getting his street, October, 2016

Dr. Abrahamson receives the University of Cincinnati President’s Award for Excellence from previous UC President, Santa Ono, 2014

 

Save the Date: Cecil Striker Society Annual Lecture May 3

The Henry R. Winkler Center for the History of the Health Professions and the Cecil Striker Society for the History of Medicine will host the 9th Cecil Striker Society Annual Lecture on Thurs., May 3, 2018.

Michael Farrell

Michael Farrell

This year’s lecture will focus on the contributions and historical relevance of Pediatrics in the Cincinnati region with a primary focus on The Children’s Hospital.  Michael Farrell, M.D. and Bea Katz, Ph.D. will serve as our co-lecturers for the event. Dr. Farrell is currently Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. He was Director of the Pediatric Residency Programs until 2001 and Chief of Staff at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center until 2015. His major interests are general pediatrics, the history of medicine and gastroenterology/nutrition. Bea Katz, Ph.D., the editor of Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center (2008) by Arcadia Publishing, has chronicled the history of Children’s Hospital for 30 years, first as a writer in the hospital’s Marketing and Communications Department and later, post-retirement, as an independent author and researcher.

Their lecture is entitled Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Impacting the Health of Children in Our Community and the World: The Past, Present and Future and will be held from 5:00-6:30pm in Kresge Auditorium, Medical Sciences Building, 231 Albert Sabin Way. A reception will immediately follow the lecture from 6:30-7:30pm held outside of the Lucas Boardroom; with an accompanying exhibit inside of the Lucas Boardroom highlighting the pediatric history of Cincinnati.

bea katz

Bea Katz

Originally formed in 1976, the initial purpose of the Society was to promote and perpetuate an interest in the history of medicine and all related disciplines in the health care field. Currently, the lecture helps to engage the local community in topics related to the history of medicine; brings people together who have a common interest in the history of medicine; and fosters positive attention to the Winkler Center through publicity and scholarly activities.

__________________________

The Henry R. Winkler Center for the History of the Health Professions gratefully recognizes the generosity and foresight of the following individuals and organizations who have provided significant support to establish the Cecil Striker Lecture Endowment Fund.  This endowment fund is a vital permanent resource to strengthen the annual lecture program.

Presenting Sponsor

Dr. and Mrs. Carl Fischer

Dr. and Mrs. Theodore W. Striker

Dr. John E. Bossert

Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center


Supporting Sponsor

UC Health

Additional support provided by Dr. and Mrs. Michael K. Farrell and Cecil L. Striker, PhD.

To discuss a gift to the Winkler Center, contact Christa A. Bernardo, Director of Development, at (513) 556-0055 or christa.bernardo@uc.edu.

African American Physicians in Cincinnati: Past, Present, & Future

The Henry R. Winkler Center for the History of the Health Professions and the University of Cincinnati Libraries are proud to sponsor the 2017 annual Cecil Striker Lecture and exhibit.  This year the program is entitled African American Physicians in Cincinnati: Past, Present & Future and features an inter-generational panel discussing challenges faced in the early integration of all-White hospitals and medical colleges, holding those doors open for others, the current state of African American physicians, and many other topics.

A corresponding exhibit chronicling the history not only of African Americans in the health professions in Cincinnati, but also, the history of health care opportunities for African Americans in the city opens on the same date.

We hope you can make it for this enlightening discussion and exhibit. Click on the invitation at right for more information and to RSVP.

In the meantime enjoy some images from the exhibit.

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