Research Labs @ GMP Library News update – Zhiyuan Yao Attends the AAG-UIUC Summer School

Zhiyuan Yao is one of two GIS support students working in the Research & Data Service research labs at the Geology Math and Physics Library.  The Data & GIS collab is open to students, staff and faculty seeking help with their geospatial data needs, and the Visualization lab is open for data visualization consultations and collaborative work.  Email us at ASKData@ucmail.uc.edu for more information.  

Great learning and collaboration experience in AAG-UIUC Summer School

This summer in July, I was honored to be offered the opportunity to attend AAG-UIUC 2019 Summer School, which focused on Reproducible Problem Solving with Cyber GIS and Geospatial Data Science. During the one-week summer camp, I met many scholars, got access to the supercomputer Virtual Roger through CyberGIS-Jupter, learned the cutting-edge advances regarding geospatial data science, and got a deeper understanding about reproducibility and replicability. I absolutely had a wonderful time there, and this experience provoked me to think more about how we could develop novel solutions to complex problems.

 

Participants in the AAG-UIUC summer school with mentor Diana Sinton (Ex Director of UCGIS in the  green shirt) in the middle.

The summer school welcomed thirty students and scholars coming from twenty-five institutions and universities, including me. We were assigned into six groups aiming to solve six computational problems. Each group also had two mentors to help develop solutions for the assigned problems. I was assigned to solve a digital humanity problem. Our group members brainstormed, collaborated and finished the project successfully.

There were also hand-on workshops displaying the techniques that were useful in solving geospatial problems. Specifically, the techniques were mainly about applying Python to handling both vector and raster data, visualizing, and doing machine learning. The techniques accelerated the problem-solving process and introduced new ways to solve problems.

A workshop in progress

Beyond the amiable collaboration and practical Python knowledge, the fantastic talks by these prestigious speakers are impressive parts of this summer school. Eric Shook talked about the CyberInfrastructure. Victoria Stodden gave a wonderful talk about reproducibility in computational and data-enabled science. Charlie Catlett talked about the Array of Things, new devices and new data that helped to build up a smart city in Chicago. Tano Malik from DePaul University introduced reproducible containers as a solution to reproducible problems. These talks were inspiring as well as provoking. It made me think deeply that applying new technology to handling geospatial data is inevitable in the future and when we celebrated the advances brought by the new technology, we needed to be aware of the problems came along with it.

The group hard at work

It is really a wonderful experience attending the summer school. I highly recommend students who are interested in geospatial science to apply for it if there is another chance in the coming year. If you have any questions regarding the summer school, please feel free to contact me through yaozu@mail.uc.edu.

XSEDE High Performance Computing (HPC) Boot Camp

Posted on behalf of Amy Latessa,  Research Coordinator for IT@UC Research & Development

The Data & Computational Science Series presents:
XSEDE High Performance Computing (HPC) Boot Camp

Free Registration (required)

Description: This 4-day event will include MPI, OpenMP, OpenACC and accelerators. This event will be presented using the Wide Area Classroom(WAC) training platform and will conclude with a special hybrid exercise contest that will challenge the students to apply their skills over the following 3 weeks and be awarded the Fifth Annual XSEDE Summer Boot Camp Championship Trophy.  In addition, an XSEDE Badge will be available to those who complete the Challenge.

Tentative Agenda

When: June 3-6, 2019

Location: Langsam Library room 462

2911 Woodside Drive
Cincinnati, OH 45221

 

Note: You need an XSEDE account to register Create Account

Parking: Woodside Avenue Garage

Special Instructions: Participants should bring their own laptop, lunch will be provided.

Questions? Contact Amy Latessa 

XSEDE (eXtreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment) is a virtual system that provides compute resources for scientists and researchers from all over the country. Its mission is to facilitate research collaboration among institutions, enhance research productivity, provide remote data transfer, and enable remote instrumentation. XSEDE is funded by National Science Foundation (NSF).  Getting Started Guide for XSEDE.

 

 

News from the RDS Research Labs @ GMP

As we begin the UC Maymester session, we are excited to share news about our students working in the Research and Data Services Research Labs @ the Geology Math and Physics Library.

We say farewell to one of our students working in the labs.  Sobiya George will return to the Chemistry Department for the summer and continue her research projects in Dr. Anna Gudmundsdottir’s lab.  We appreciate Sobiya’s hard work on the ImageJ and Zotero workshops, and wish her luck on her research.

Zhiyuan Yao, Sobiya George, and Jenny Latessa

And we offer many congratulations to Zhiyuan Yao on her acceptance to the AAG-UCGIS Summer School 2019.   Through this NSF supported program, Zhiyuan will be working with “30 graduate students and early career scholars to learn and collaborate in developing novel solutions to complex problems and to take advantage of geospatial data science and cutting-edge scientific advances and technical capabilities of cyberGIS (e.g., CyberGIS-Jupyter and Virtual ROGER: cybergis.illinois.edu/infrastructures). Participants will experience the types of collaborative and professional interactions that are key to addressing reproducible geospatial problem solving in the context of computation- and/or data-intensive research involving confidential geospatial data.”  This is an amazing opportunity for Zhiyuan to grow her skills and meet other researchers in the GIS field.  To learn more about this program, visit their website.  Good luck and enjoy the program.

Zhiyuan Yao in the Data & GIS Collab
Zhiyuan Yao

The lab will be open for consultations and workshops over the summer.  Check the Research Labs website  for the latest information on hours and any closures due to vacations.  Please note that many changes are coming to the libraries website as part of the greater UC website refresh.  For now, one easy way to find the Research Labs website is to visit the library libguide page and type in GIS.  The parent RDS website can now be found under the Research tab on the main Libraries.uc.edu website.  Email AskData@UC.edu if you have any questions.

Reflections of UC Data Day 2019 –

Article Written by Rebecca Olson – Social Science and Business Informationist.

On April 1, 2019, UC Libraries hosted the 4th annual Data Day Conference. A celebration of research being held on campus, in the local area, and on the national and international level, this year’s focus was on Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in data.

The first keynote speaker, Amanda J. Wilson, detailed the All of Us program the National Library of Medicine and National institute of Health have funded and promoted. Individuals are allowed to take charge of their health by participating in and directing research. Parts of the program include providing access to resources at libraries, community centers, and laundromats to reach the broadest population.

Continue reading Reflections of UC Data Day 2019 –

Workshop on Research Reproducibility and Data Visualization using R.

Join UCLibraries and IT@UC for a workshop on Research Reproducibility and Data Visualization using R (part of the Data and Computational Science Series (funded by the Provost Office through a universal provider grant).

 

On April 16th, Dr. Mine Cetinkaya-Rundel, Associate Professor at Duke University and Data Scientist & Professional Educator at RStudio will be on campus to give a presentation about Reproducible Research and conduct a workshop on Data Visualization in R.

The day’s schedule is below.  The venue will be the Data Visualization Space in the Geology-Math-Physics Library – 240H Braunstein Hall.

10:00 am to 11:00 am  Presentation – Reproducible Research

11:00 am to 12:00 pm  Meet and Greet with Dr. Cetinkaya-Rundel  (Lunch provided)

12:00 pm to 2:00 pm  Workshop – Data Visualization in R with ggplot2 and gganimate

 

These events are free and open to all.

Visit the Faculty One Stop website to register.

More information about the DCSS 2019 series can be found on the DCSS website .

Flyer: DCS2 Word flyer_Rstudio

Workshop on Text mining HathiTrust Resources with python

 

 

 

 

 

Eleanor Dickson Koehl, digital scholarship librarian with the HathiTrust will visit UC Libraries to give a presentation on the HathiTrust Research Center and conduct a workshop on text mining using HathiTrust Resources and python.  The talk will be Tuesday Feb 26th from 3- 4 pm and the workshop will be Wednesday Morning from 9am -12pm with a luncheon afterwards from 12 pm-1 pm.  Please join for one or both events which will be held in the Vis Lab 240H Braunstein Hall – inside the Geology-Math and Physics Library.  These events are free and open to all.  We request that attendees of the text mining workshop complete registration through the faculty one stop system.

For more information please refer to the DCS2 Word flyer_hathi_2019.

XSEDE HPC Workshop on Big Data – Feb 12-13

XSEDE monthly HPC workshop: Big Data

Free Registration (required)

Tentative Agenda

Description:                   This workshop will introduce scalable data analytics and machine learning.

It is a two-day, hands-on workshop using Hadoop, Spark and TensorFlow.

No prerequisites, although some familiarity with Python would be helpful.

When:                              Tuesday Feb 12th and Wednesday Feb 13th from 11 am to 5 pm.

Location:                         Teachers-Dyer Complex – CECH Library Room 320

2610 McMicken Circle – Cincinnati OH 45221

Note:                                You need an XSEDE account to register Create Account

Parking:                          CCM parking garage or the Stratford Heights parking garage

Special Instructions:   Participants should bring their own laptop, lunch will be provided.

Questions?                    Contact Amy Latessa latessak@uc.edu

XSEDE (eXtreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment) is a virtual system that provides compute resources for scientists and researchers from all over the country. Its mission is to facilitate research collaboration among institutions, enhance research productivity, provide remote data transfer, and enable remote instrumentation. XSEDE is funded by National Science Foundation (NSF).  Getting Started Guide for XSEDE.

Flyers: BigData_workshopflyer_Feb2019 DCSS flyer_xsede Big Data

Data Visualization Lunch & Learn and Hands-on Shiny Workshop – Nov 28th 11:45 am to 3 pm

Join us Wednesday, November 28 for a Lunch & Learn and Hands-on Shiny Workshop with Dr. Olga Scrivner, Research Scientist at Indiana University’s Cyberinfrastructure for Network Science Center. REGISTER

Olga Scrivner is a research scientist at Cyberinfrastructure for Network Science Center (CNS) in the School of Informatics, Computing, and Engineering at Indiana University, a faculty fellow at the Center of Excellence for Women in Technology, and a corporate faculty in Data Analytics at Harrisburg University of Science and Technology. She has substantive expertise in developing web application tools for data mining and visualization using Shiny and R. Her current research at CNS focuses on mapping of occupational landscape and educational attainment, with specific emphasis in understanding the healthcare workforce in the areas affected by opioid epidemic.

Wednesday November 28 in Langsam Library room 475  LUNCH WILL BE PROVIDED.


11:45AM – 1PM: LUNCH & LEARN – THE IMPORTANCE OF DATA VISUALIZATION
If a picture is worth of a thousand words, data visualization is worth millions: Toward a framework for actionable visual insights
Current shift in scientific landscape toward cross-disciplinary teams, evolving cyberinfrastructure and complex data requires a new kind of data analysis and visualization tools. This talk will introduce a visualization framework developed at Cyberinfrastructure for Network Science Center (CNS) at Indiana University, founded and directed by Professor Katy Börner, Victor H. Yngve Distinguished Professor of Engineering and Information Science (http://cns.iu.edu).


1PM – 3PM: BUILDING INTERACTIVE WEB APPLICATIONS: DATA VISUALIZATION WITH SHINY
This two hour hands-on workshop will step through the process of building, visualizing, deploying, and sharing Shiny web applications. Learning this workflow will enable you to build your own interactive tools that can be used for research and teaching.

Missing Maps Mapathon held at UC Libraries

On Nov 3rd, the Red Cross and UC libraries partnered to hold a second Missing Maps Mapathon. Missing Maps is an open, collaborative project in which you can help to map areas where humanitarian organisations are trying to meet the needs of vulnerable people.

During the mapathon, participants used the Open Street Map platform to identify buildings in satellite images and place them on a regional map (georeference).  The Red Cross uses this information to set up emergency services in areas that are impacted by natural disasters such as floods and earthquakes.  The mapping will be verified by Red Cross volunteers working in the mapped country and will help prepare response teams in the area to better assist if disaster strikes.

This year’s project covered three areas in the Lake Chad region in Niger.  This region of the world is experiencing a great humanitarian crisis due to poor infrastructure, conflict, poverty, and climate change.  It has been reported that nearly 17 million people are affected by the dire situation and 10.7 million are in need of humanitarian assistance.  The International Red Cross has been working in the area for thirty years and coordinates efforts with local relief agencies.

At this year’s event, UC Geography student Rachel Byrd led UC Cincinnatus Scholar students, UC Librarian Amy Koshoffer, UC Press Director Liz Scarpelli,  and Red Cross International Services Manager Paula McIntosh through the 4 hour mapping session.  In the span of four hours, volunteers were able to map three regions around the lake and identified 6065 buildings.  Many thanks to all who participated and contributed to the mission of the Red Cross.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How UC Researchers use the Open Science Framework – Theresa Culley, Head of Biological Sciences and Professor of Biology, Editor-in-Chief Applications in Plant Sciences

Researcher Name: Theresa Culley, Head of Biological Sciences and Professor of Biology, Editor-in-Chief Applications in Plant Sciences

In our fourth installment of the series “How UC Researchers use the Open Science Framework”, we hear from  Theresa Culley, Head of Biological Sciences and Professor of Biology, Editor-in-Chief Applications in Plant Sciences

 

Theresa Culley - 2018 Head of Biological Sciences

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research Project Description or statement about your research interest:

My research area in Botany focuses on plant population biology and genetics and I have a deep interest in the evolution of invasive species.  I am also very interested in publication patterns regarding research involving hotspot areas of biodiversity.  My lab has been considering the question of whether researchers from developing countries, which have the most biodiversity hotspots, receive adequate credit for their work.  We are currently working on a project examining publishing bias in the scientific literature about plant conservation genetics.  This collaboration is in partnership with UC Libraries’ Digital Scholarship Center and is one of several collaborations funded by a $900,000 Andrew W. Mellon Foundation awarded to the Center.  I am also interested in this topics in my role as Editor-in-Chief for Applications in Plant Sciences.

Why did you chose to use the OSF to organize your research/projects?

I am an advocate for data sharing and reproducible research.  In an editorial I wrote for Applications in Plant Sciences, I highlighted the many reasons to ensure access to data and major considerations behind why researchers may not want to share data.  A resource like the open science framework is an excellent tool for promoting transparency and reproducibility and advancing the field at an accelerated pace.  The OSF helps to manage the entire project and especially makes it easy to share data within our research group and with collaborators.  This is a great place to manage the active parts of a project, and link all the different tools that members of a research group use .  We also have the ability to archive data and content here and look forward to a possible integration into our Institutional Repository in the future.

What about the OSF makes this tool a good choice for your project management (i.e. specific function of the OSF)?

Some of my team members prefer to use Dropbox and some are using Box.  Using the OSF makes it possible to bring all the different tools we are using under one project umbrella.  And it helps us to track activity on the project.

Additional comment for the post that you are willing to share:

Currently our project is not public, but we hope to share components in the future.

The Center for Open Science has been a great resource for our lab and the journal Applications in Plant Sciences.  In August 2016, the journal adopted the TOP guidelines, along with its sister journal, American Journal of Botany.