Love Your Data Week Day 2 Documenting, Describing and Defining

Today’s Love Your Data Week’s post is by Tiffany Grant PhD, Interim Assistant Director for Research and Informatics at the Health Sciences Library (HSL) and Research Informationist.

The Big 3 of Data

Documenting, describing and defining your data are the 3 most critical components of good data management and your data legacy. If done properly, documentation ensures accurate interpretation and reproducibility of your data. Additionally, it improves the integrity of the scholarly record by providing a more complete picture of how your research was conducted.

Data Things to Do

  1. Document all file names and formats associated with your project
  2. Describe how your data was derived including a description of any equipment and/or software used in the process
    1. Describe your file naming conventions and folder structures
  3. Define any abbreviations, variables or codes used in your data or your file names/folders

Big 3 Data Basics

Who: Who are the contributors?

What: What kind of data was collected and what analyses were done to generate the data?

Why: Why was the project started, i.e. what questions did you hope to answer?

Where: Where did you get your data (if you aren’t the creator)? What is the physical location of the data?

How: How was your data generated?  

Message of the day

Good documentation tells people they can trust your data by enabling validation, replication, and reuse.

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Love Your Data Week Day 1 Defining Data Quality

Today’s LYD post features the thoughts of Dylan Shields, the Graduate Assistant for the Chemistry-Biology Library and Chemistry Graduate Student in Anna Gudmundsdottir’s Lab.

Welcome back to another edition of Love Your Data Week!!

The first topic for this week is going to focus on DEFINING DATA QUALITY!

So what IS data quality? Well, first off it is important to note that data quality definitions and practices can differ quite vastly depending on the field of study. However, there are a few markers of data quality that can be broadly applicable to most research. These markers include: accuracy, consistency, completeness, and accessibility.

So what are these markers and why are they important?

Continue reading Love Your Data Week Day 1 Defining Data Quality

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Spring Semester 2017 GIS Learning Community Meetings

If you have an interest in connecting with others using or learning about GIS, then please join the GIS Learning Community at an upcoming meeting.

Date: Feb 1st , March 8th , April 12th

Time: 3:15 pm to 4:25 pm

Venue: 462 Langsam

GIS stands for Geographic Information Systems.  The goal of the community is to create a user-driven forum for novice and expert practitioners to come together and discuss tools, resources and solutions to questions and new projects that develop as researchers consider the spatial aspects of their data.   We invite interested individual across all of UC to join us in building this community.

Contact Amy Koshoffer at koshofae@ucmail.uc.edu with questions or to be added to the GIS LC mailing list.

Visit UC Libraries Research Data and GIS Services website for more information: http://libraries.uc.edu/digital-scholarship/data-services.html

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Presenting Geoffrey Pinski, Dec. 12, to Talk about Intellectual Property and Research Data

Geoffrey Pinski
Geoffrey Pinski

Are you wondering about IP?

Join the University of Cincinnati Libraries 1 p.m., Monday, Dec. 12, to learn about Intellectual Property (IP) and how it plays a role in your scholarship and research.

Geoffrey Pinski, director, UC Technology Accelerator for Commercialization, will talk on IP and Research Data.

Intellectual Property and Research Data

Date:  December 12, 2016

Time: 1:00 pm

Venue:  3351 Medical Sciences Building (MSB)

The talk is free and open to all.

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Updated Room! Making Sense of Biomedical Literature, a Clinical & Translational Research Training Workshop

Given the popularity of this workshop, “The Making Sense of Biomedical Literature – a Biostatistician’s Perspective” Clinical & Translational Research Training Workshop will be held in MSB 5051

Registration for the workshop can be completed here. | For more information, please contact Emma Jones (Emma.Jones@uc.edu)

Rworkshop20160808V2

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Intro to GIS workshop

HamCo

Want to work with a geographic information system (GIS) but are not sure where to start?

This workshop is for individuals who want to visualize spatial patterns in data but have no experience with a geographic information system (GIS) software or who want to learn about resources available to the UC community through UC Libraries and the Department of Geography.  Workshop instructors will guide participants as they create a GIS using the software ARCGIS to visualize a dataset and create a map providing further insight into the data.

Monday March 14       1-3 pm GIS Lab – 415 Braunstein Hall

Friday March 18           12:30- 2:30 pm HSL Classroom

To register visit: http://webcentral.uc.edu/hslclass/home.aspx

 

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