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Ohio Supercomputer Center Workshop – Oct 10th

Posted on Behalf of Jane Combs –  combsje@uc.edu.

The Ohio Supercomputer Center will offer two workshops on its resources and how to use them Tuesday, October 10, on both East and West campuses.

IT@UC Research & Development will be hosting the Ohio Supercomputer Center for two workshops on Tuesday, October 10. The morning workshop will provide an introduction to the Ohio Supercomputer Center resources and how to use them. In the afternoon, the workshop will cover Big Data Analytics and Spark.

Register for the workshops HERE

The Ohio Supercomputer Center, headquartered in Columbus, partners with Ohio researchers to develop proposals to funding organizations and is the state’s leading strategic research group.

Continue reading Ohio Supercomputer Center Workshop – Oct 10th

Most UC Libraries Closed Labor Day, September 4

labor dayUC Libraries will be closed Monday, September 4 for Labor Day, except for the Donald C. Harrison Health Sciences Library, which will be open 9am-5pm. This closing includes the Langsam Library 4th floor space, which will close Sunday, September 3 at 11pm and re-open Tuesday, September 5 at 7:45am.

A complete listing of library hours can be found online at www.libraries.uc.edu/about/hours.html.

Enjoy the long holiday weekend.

Data & GIS Collab hours for the next two weeks

The hours for the Data & GIS Collab (located in the Geo-Math Physics library in Braunstein Hall) for the dates Friday July 7th to Monday July 17th  will be as follows:

Friday July 7th the consult hours will be 10 am to 2 pm

There will be no consult hours from Monday July 10th through Monday July 17th.  On July 18th  the normal schedule will resume.

During these times, both workstations will be available for self directed public use.

This information will also be on the campus guide: http://guides.libraries.uc.edu/GIS/CollabInfo

Email ASKGIS@UC.Edu with questions

Sign into your ORCID account using your UC login

What is an ORCID?   ORCID stands for Open Researcher and Contributor ID.

You can now access your ORCID account using your UC login.

Visit the ORCID login page and click the Institutional Account button.  Choose University of Cincinnati Main Campus.  You will be prompted to link the two accounts.

Don’t have an ORCID yet?

You can register directly on the website http://orcid.org

OR Even Better

You can access a prefilled registration form linked to your UC email through Scholar@UC on your profile page.

Currently you can enrich your ORCID profile with content in Scholar using a DOI given to the work. (link to video-http://www.kaltura.com/tiny/ycktt 2017-03-17)

For more information about this new login feature, please refer to the blog post from ORCID

https://orcid.org/blog/2016/05/21/what-was-my-password-again

Contact ASKDATA@UC.EDU for more information or with questions.

OSF FOR UC is here

The Researcher Services group, an initiative of UC Libraries with the IT@UC R&D Team, is pleased to announce a new tool for research projects: OSF for UC.

There is no cost to use OSF for UC.  OSF, or the Open Science Framework, an open-source workflow tool appropriate for any discipline and developed by the Center for Open Science.

OSF for UCosf.uc.edu — is UC’s portal for students, faculty, staff and others who need to manage project files and documents.  Sign-in is easy – go to osf.uc.edu, sign in, choose University of Cincinnati, then your UC 6+2 Central Login.

Through OSF, project teams can assign collaborators (internal and external to UC) and share project documents at a granular level (only share what you want, with whom you want).  Projects managed through the OSF are private by default.  Any or all parts of a project can be made public as desired or required by grant funders or others. 

Continue reading OSF FOR UC is here

Ohio Supercomputer Center workshops on April 13, 2017

IT@UC Research & Development will be hosting the Ohio Supercomputer Center for two workshops on Thursday, April 13. The morning workshop will provide an introduction to the Ohio Supercomputer Center resources and how to use them. In the afternoon, the workshop will cover Big Data Analytics and Spark.
The morning session will be held from 10-11:30 a.m. on West Campus in Langsam Library, room 475. The afternoon session will be held from 1:30-3:30 p.m. on East Campus in MSBRCV, E602. Laptops are needed if attendees want to participate in the hands-on portions of the sessions.
For more information and to register:  click here

Love Your Data Week Day 5 Rescuing Unloved Data

Today’s LYD post is by Amy Koshoffer, Science Informationist based at the Geology Math and Physics Library with editorial support from Dr. Eric J. Tepe, Assistant Professor of Biology and Curator of the Margaret H. Fulford Herbarium.

It has been sometime since I stepped over the threshold of my old lab in the Care/Crawley Building. Many changes occurred in the interim including a move to another floor of the building. There are times I miss the bench research and the data I created in my time as a senior research assistant. One of my favorite techniques was microscopy and particularly Electron Microscopy (EM). I remember the multitude of samples processed, the long wait for samples to be ready to image and then finally all the amazing images we captured. Processing samples for EM imagining is a long and sometimes challenging technique. The samples need to be dehydrated and then infiltrated with a resin to stabilize the structures and prevent destruction from the electron beam during viewing. You might not know if a sample has been ideally preserved until you get to the imaging lab and begin to examine the sample. But what joy when the images look amazing with crisp detail and no water holes. So much work and resources went into the sample preservation and acquiring images.

I wonder what will happen to that effort in the years and decades to come. Are there others who might want to use the physical samples and digital images in their own work? Did I do what was needed to make sure that someone could reuse all the data created? Continue reading Love Your Data Week Day 5 Rescuing Unloved Data