Digital Archivist Eira Tansey Named an Archives Leadership Institute Cohort

Eira Tansey

Eira Tansey

Eira Tansey, digital archivist and records manager in the Archives and Rare Books Library, has been selected as an ALI17 cohort member. The Archives Leadership Institute (ALI) is a program funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC), a statutory body affiliated with the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), and is being hosted at Berea College for the years 2016-18. ALI will provide advanced training for 25 archival leaders each year, giving them the knowledge and tools to transform the profession in practice, theory and attitude.

“The Archives Leadership Institute is a well-regarded program in the American archives profession that brings together archivists of diverse backgrounds and work experiences to learn leadership skills together at a week-long institute every summer,” said Eira. “All ALI participants commit to working on a practicum at their home institution, and I have committed to working on increasing documentation of student life within University Archives at the Archives and Rare Books Library.”

Eira joins an elite group attending ALI as only 25 people are accepted each year. More about the Archives Leadership Institute is available on its website.

The Children of Lir: Ireland’s Sweethearts

By: Sydney Vollmer, ARB Intern

It’s that time of year again. Winter is *hopefully* leaving and making room for spring.  March brings a lot to look forward to, especially for the Irish-American community.  Every year since 1991, the president has declared March to be National Irish Heritage Month.  But what does Irish heritage mean?  One University Honors class is on a mission to find the answer to that question.  It turns out that “to be Irish” means a lot more than having red hair, drinking beer, and being one with a short temper.  Led by professor Kevin Grace, along with Debbie Brawn of University Honors, 20 students will travel to Ireland over spring break to get an in-depth look at the country from where so many Americans emigrated.  The weeks leading up to the study tour were filled with readings of Irish-American literature, such as Angela’s Ashes and Irish America: Coming Into Clover, as well as the viewing of films and many discussions about what Irish heritage means. Continue reading

Inside a Costumer’s Mind: 12 Questions with Cincinnati Shakespeare Company’s Resident Costume Designer, Amanda McGee

By: Sydney Vollmer, ARB Intern

Almost one year ago, Jeremy Dubin, Artistic Associate with at the Cincinnati Shakespeare Company, was kind enough to answer some questions we at the ARB had about the company. After writing our last blog on the costume designs in King Lear, we decided we were curious about what goes on in the mind of a costume designer. So, we went back to the CSC. Resident Costume Designer, Amanda McGee, answered everything we wanted to know. Below is the full copy of the interview with images.  

Amanda McGee

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King Richard III: A Hunch about his Costume

Sydney Vollmer, Archives & Rare Books Library Intern

For those faithful followers who have not been keeping up with local theater, the Cincinnati Shakespeare Company’s next production will be Richard III, running February 17th through March 11th. Their website (http://www.cincyshakes.com/) says of the show:

Shakespeare’s game of thrones enters its endgame as the history cycle’s final chapter takes the stage. The ruthless, remorseless and relentless Richard Plantagenet has his eyes set on the throne of England, and he makes the happy earth his hell as he carves a bloody swath through all that stands in his way. The History Cycle comes to its thrilling conclusion with the story of England’s most murderous monarch, Richard III. Paired with the production of Henry VI: The Wars of the Roses, Part 2, this theatrical event is not to be missed! Continue reading

Love Your Data Week Day 5 Rescuing Unloved Data

Today’s LYD post is by Amy Koshoffer, Science Informationist based at the Geology Math and Physics Library with editorial support from Dr. Eric J. Tepe, Assistant Professor of Biology and Curator of the Margaret H. Fulford Herbarium.

It has been sometime since I stepped over the threshold of my old lab in the Care/Crawley Building. Many changes occurred in the interim including a move to another floor of the building. There are times I miss the bench research and the data I created in my time as a senior research assistant. One of my favorite techniques was microscopy and particularly Electron Microscopy (EM). I remember the multitude of samples processed, the long wait for samples to be ready to image and then finally all the amazing images we captured. Processing samples for EM imagining is a long and sometimes challenging technique. The samples need to be dehydrated and then infiltrated with a resin to stabilize the structures and prevent destruction from the electron beam during viewing. You might not know if a sample has been ideally preserved until you get to the imaging lab and begin to examine the sample. But what joy when the images look amazing with crisp detail and no water holes. So much work and resources went into the sample preservation and acquiring images.

I wonder what will happen to that effort in the years and decades to come. Are there others who might want to use the physical samples and digital images in their own work? Did I do what was needed to make sure that someone could reuse all the data created? Continue reading

Love Your Data Week Day 4 – Finding the Right Data

Today’s LYD post is by Don P. Jason III, MLIS, MS, Clinical Informationist based at the Donald C. Harrison Health Sciences Library.

Welcome to Day 4 of “Love Your Data Week!” Whether you’re a student analyzing a data set for a school project or a researcher combining data sets to create new insights, finding the right data is essential! This blog post will list a few places you can look to find free, authoritative and unique data sets. The data sets have be broken down into three categories:  US Government Data Sets, International Data Sets and Google Data Sets.

US Government Data Sets

Data.gov http://data.gov – This web site has an eclectic mix of datasets from criminal justice to climate data.  This government site encourages people to use the data to create web and mobile applications and design data visualizations.

US Census Bureau http://www.census.gov/data.html – This web site provides data on the US population and economy.  Utilizing this site’s data has never been easier thanks to new: API’s, data visualizations, mobile apps and interactive web apps.

Healthdata.gov https://www.healthdata.gov/ – This web site includes US healthcare data.  The site is dedicated to making high value health data more accessible to entrepreneurs, researchers and policy makers.

National Climatic Data Center http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/data-access/quick-links#loc-clim – This is the world’s largest archive of weather data. It has a robust collection of environmental, meteorological and climate data sets from the US National Climatic Data Center.

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Love Your Data Week Day 3 – Good data examples

Today’s Love Your Data Week’s post is by Tiffany Grant PhD, Interim Assistant Director for Research and Informatics at the Health Sciences Library (HSL) and Research Informationist.

Data, FAIR Data

If asked to define good data, the definitions would run the gamut, as the interpretation of the term will be specific to the types and formats of data typically collected by the individual. However, simply put, good data meets the standard of being of good quality, and data quality generally refers to the ability of data to serve the use it was intended. In short, data quality hinges on the reliability and application efficiency of data. The combination of good data quality and data documentation ensures accurate interpretation and reproducibility. Beyond documentation, a number of federal mandates dictate that data be shared beyond one’s own lab notebook, and in order to ensure proper interpretation and reproducibility of your data, it must be FAIR.

 

 

 

 

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Love Your Data Week Day 2 Documenting, Describing and Defining

Today’s Love Your Data Week’s post is by Tiffany Grant PhD, Interim Assistant Director for Research and Informatics at the Health Sciences Library (HSL) and Research Informationist.

The Big 3 of Data

Documenting, describing and defining your data are the 3 most critical components of good data management and your data legacy. If done properly, documentation ensures accurate interpretation and reproducibility of your data. Additionally, it improves the integrity of the scholarly record by providing a more complete picture of how your research was conducted.

Data Things to Do

  1. Document all file names and formats associated with your project
  2. Describe how your data was derived including a description of any equipment and/or software used in the process
    1. Describe your file naming conventions and folder structures
  3. Define any abbreviations, variables or codes used in your data or your file names/folders

Big 3 Data Basics

Who: Who are the contributors?

What: What kind of data was collected and what analyses were done to generate the data?

Why: Why was the project started, i.e. what questions did you hope to answer?

Where: Where did you get your data (if you aren’t the creator)? What is the physical location of the data?

How: How was your data generated?  

Message of the day

Good documentation tells people they can trust your data by enabling validation, replication, and reuse.

Love Your Data Week Day 1 Defining Data Quality

Today’s LYD post features the thoughts of Dylan Shields, the Graduate Assistant for the Chemistry-Biology Library and Chemistry Graduate Student in Anna Gudmundsdottir’s Lab.

Welcome back to another edition of Love Your Data Week!!

The first topic for this week is going to focus on DEFINING DATA QUALITY!

So what IS data quality? Well, first off it is important to note that data quality definitions and practices can differ quite vastly depending on the field of study. However, there are a few markers of data quality that can be broadly applicable to most research. These markers include: accuracy, consistency, completeness, and accessibility.

So what are these markers and why are they important?

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Love Your Data Week 2017

Drop the roses and the box of chocolate because Love Your Data week is almost here.  All next week, the UC Libraries informationist team will be blogging loving tips about how to best care for your research data.  The theme for 2017 is emphasizing data quality for researchers at any stage in their career and the daily topics are:

Feb 13th  – Defining Data Quality

Feb 14th Documenting, Describing, Defining

Feb 15th  Good Data Examples

Feb 16th –  Finding the Right Data

Feb 17thRescuing Unloved Data

Follow the action or join in on Twitter using hashtags (#LYD17 #loveyourdata)

 

Other social media outlets will be Facebook, Instagram and Pinterest.

So much better for you and your data than a box of chocolate!

Questions and comments to AskData@uc.edu

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