Love Your Data Week Day 5 Rescuing Unloved Data

Today’s LYD post is by Amy Koshoffer, Science Informationist based at the Geology Math and Physics Library with editorial support from Dr. Eric J. Tepe, Assistant Professor of Biology and Curator of the Margaret H. Fulford Herbarium.

It has been sometime since I stepped over the threshold of my old lab in the Care/Crawley Building. Many changes occurred in the interim including a move to another floor of the building. There are times I miss the bench research and the data I created in my time as a senior research assistant. One of my favorite techniques was microscopy and particularly Electron Microscopy (EM). I remember the multitude of samples processed, the long wait for samples to be ready to image and then finally all the amazing images we captured. Processing samples for EM imagining is a long and sometimes challenging technique. The samples need to be dehydrated and then infiltrated with a resin to stabilize the structures and prevent destruction from the electron beam during viewing. You might not know if a sample has been ideally preserved until you get to the imaging lab and begin to examine the sample. But what joy when the images look amazing with crisp detail and no water holes. So much work and resources went into the sample preservation and acquiring images.

I wonder what will happen to that effort in the years and decades to come. Are there others who might want to use the physical samples and digital images in their own work? Did I do what was needed to make sure that someone could reuse all the data created? Continue reading

Love Your Data Week Day 4 – Finding the Right Data

Today’s LYD post is by Don P. Jason III, MLIS, MS, Clinical Informationist based at the Donald C. Harrison Health Sciences Library.

Welcome to Day 4 of “Love Your Data Week!” Whether you’re a student analyzing a data set for a school project or a researcher combining data sets to create new insights, finding the right data is essential! This blog post will list a few places you can look to find free, authoritative and unique data sets. The data sets have be broken down into three categories:  US Government Data Sets, International Data Sets and Google Data Sets.

US Government Data Sets

Data.gov http://data.gov – This web site has an eclectic mix of datasets from criminal justice to climate data.  This government site encourages people to use the data to create web and mobile applications and design data visualizations.

US Census Bureau http://www.census.gov/data.html – This web site provides data on the US population and economy.  Utilizing this site’s data has never been easier thanks to new: API’s, data visualizations, mobile apps and interactive web apps.

Healthdata.gov https://www.healthdata.gov/ – This web site includes US healthcare data.  The site is dedicated to making high value health data more accessible to entrepreneurs, researchers and policy makers.

National Climatic Data Center http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/data-access/quick-links#loc-clim – This is the world’s largest archive of weather data. It has a robust collection of environmental, meteorological and climate data sets from the US National Climatic Data Center.

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For the Love of the Library — Thank You!

 

The Clermont College Library hosted a special event, For the Love of the Library, on Thursday, February 9th.  The purpose of this event was to highlight the 1st floor renovations made possible by our donors and share plans for student-centered improvements to our library’s 2nd floor.

 

Thanks to all who celebrated with us from our community, UC’s Clifton campus, UC Libraries, and UC Clermont.

Katie Foran-Mulcahy
Library Director

Love Your Data Week Day 1 Defining Data Quality

Today’s LYD post features the thoughts of Dylan Shields, the Graduate Assistant for the Chemistry-Biology Library and Chemistry Graduate Student in Anna Gudmundsdottir’s Lab.

Welcome back to another edition of Love Your Data Week!!

The first topic for this week is going to focus on DEFINING DATA QUALITY!

So what IS data quality? Well, first off it is important to note that data quality definitions and practices can differ quite vastly depending on the field of study. However, there are a few markers of data quality that can be broadly applicable to most research. These markers include: accuracy, consistency, completeness, and accessibility.

So what are these markers and why are they important?

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Black X Design

 

 

 

 

 

 

Randy Wilson and DAAP Library Staff partnered to create “Black By Design,” a display that showcases pioneers and youngbloods in black fashion. Many of the images in the display are from the Vogue Archive, a database of every Vogue magazine ever published. The drawings were custom created by Professor Wilson himself.

Dean’s Corner: Remembering Dr. Henry Heimlich

I first met Dr. Henry Heimlich, or “Hank”, shortly after I arrived at the University of Cincinnati. To my surprise, he had expressed a strong interest in meeting me, so I eagerly invited him to join me for dinner at my home, along with Associate Dean Emeritus Steve Marine, the libraries’ Director of Development Christa Bernardo and our respective spouses. It was then that I learned of his time as a surgeon with the US Naval Group in World War II. Hank had been stationed in China, and his first stop was my hometown of Chongqing.

Sharing dinner at my home with Hank Heimlich

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New Exhibit Uncovers Black History through Arts & Education


On display on the 5th floor of Langsam Library, the exhibit “Uncovering Black History through Arts & Education” features prominent black writers, poets, educators and musicians. Featured in the exhibit are such notables as Rita Dove, Phillis Wheatley, Derrick Bell, Katherine Johnson, Muddy Waters and Tammi Terrell among others. A bibliography of related resources found in UC Libraries is located at the exhibit and online.

The “Uncovering Black History through Arts and Education” exhibit was curated by Meshia Anderson, acquisitions specialist in UC Libraries, and designed by Jessica Burhans, spring semester communications co-op design student from the College of Design, Architecture, Art and Planning.

The exhibit was produced in coordination with an event scheduled for Wednesday, Feb. 8, 2017, 2:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m., fourth floor Langsam Library in the Digital Commons Space. At the event, free and open to all, Littisha Bates, associate professor of sociology in the College of Arts and Sciences, will speak about sociology of black families. Other activities will include poetry, soulful food bites and interactive trivia based on the exhibit. Brandon Hawkins of Soul Palette, a company that creates paint party experiences, will help everyone tap into their inner artistry.

Patent Searching Workshops in February

UC Libraries is pleased to present a NEW workshop on Patents and Patent SearchingJoin us in 475 Langsam Library.

US Pat 725,069: Body Attachable Sunshade

Instructor: Dylan Shields, PhD Candidate in Chemistry & Grad Assistant in the Chemistry-Biology Library, scilib@ucmail.uc.edu

Description: A general introduction to patents and patent databases. Learn the basics components of patent documents and the various types of patents. Through hands-on examples, learn techniques for searching in some major patent information databases. Workshop materials can be perused at http://guides.libraries.uc.edu/patentworkshop.  The workshop will be taught multiple times in February (same content each time).

To Register: log in with your UC Central Login at the links below.

Join Us for “Uncovering Black History through Arts & Education” Event and Exhibit

uncoversing black history

Join the University of Cincinnati Libraries for “Uncovering Black History through Arts and Education,” 2:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m., Wednesday, Feb. 8, on the fourth floor of Langsam Library in the Digital Commons Space. At the event, free and open to all, Littisha Bates, associate professor of sociology in the College of Arts and Sciences, will speak about sociology of black families. Other activities will include painting, trivia and cultural food favorites.

In coordination with the event, check out the exhibit on the 5th floor of Langsam Library featuring Black writers, poets, educators and musicians. Featured in the exhibit are Rita Dove, Phillis Wheatley, Derrick Bell, Katherine Johnson, Muddy Waters and Tammi Terrell among others. The exhibit will be available February 6 through March 30. A bibliography of related resources found in UC Libraries is located at the exhibit.

The “Uncovering Black History through Arts and Education” exhibit was curated by Meshia Anderson, acquisitions specialist in UC Libraries, and designed by Jessica Burhans, communications co-op design student from the College of Design, Architecture, Art and Planning.

A Zeiss Butter Refractometer : Notes from the Oesper Collections, No. 42, January/February 2017

The circa 1920 Zeiss butter refractometer recently acquired by the Oesper Collections.

The circa 1920 Zeiss butter refractometer recently acquired by the Oesper Collections.

Issue 42 describes a new addition to the museum’s refractometer collection – a circa 1920 Zeiss butter refractometer – and its historical importance as a means for rapidly differentiating between pure butter and margarine.

Click here for all other issues of Notes from the Oesper Collections and to explore the Jensen-Thomas Apparatus Collection.

 

 

 

 

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