A Different Approach to Public Engagement with Science – Great Lakes Science Boot Camp Virtual Talk

On Thursday, July 23rd, I gave a talk to ~60 Science Librarians across the country. This talk was a reflection on my experience taking a graduate course in the spring called “Public Engagement with Science” and was a way to inform fellow librarians on how they can make public engagement activities more intentional and meaningful. The final project of the course was to accomplish a public engagement with science activity in conjunction with a community partner drawing on the theoretical framework developed throughout the semester. My group worked with the Cincinnati Nature Center to host a poster contest that was in line with the mission of the Nature Center by aiming to increase awareness of the importance of native plants in the local ecology and to encourage people in the community to plant native plants.

I focused on ways the Center for Public Engagement with Science at the University of Cincinnati is working with community partners to engage in more intentional and informed science engagement activities. I discussed the process of working with community partners, the philosophy of public engagement that motivated our interactions and activity, the project we implemented including the development of relevant learning standards and a grading rubric, and shared some of the winning submissions.

If anyone would like to discuss my talk, my experience in the course, or see my slides, please email me at mark.chalmers@uc.edu.

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Offering Workshops on the Publishing Life Cycle of Data

In partnership with the Faculty Enrichment Center, UC Libraries RDS and IT@UC Advance Research Computing are pleased to offer the next three sessions in our DCSS series focused on the Publishing Life Cycle of Data.  Visit the Faculty One Stop Professional Development site for more information and to register for any of these events.

Next up in the series:

July 13, 2-3 p.m. Getting Published – A Journal Editors’ Panel  will feature UC faculty and staff who serve as editors on journals discussing how to identify the right journal, avoid predatory journals and how to make the biggest impact with your research and scholarship by publishing more than just the article including data publishing and taking an active role in the publishing workflow.  Jeff Blevins, Theresa Culley, Steve Lang and Victoria Carr are the featured editors. Visit the Faculty One Stop Professional Development to register for this event.

Jeff Blevins, Theresa Culley, Steve Lang and Victoria Carr
Jeff Blevins, Theresa Culley, Steve Lang and Victoria Carr

Save the dates for these upcoming events as registration information will be available soon:

July 27, 2-3 p.m. “Understanding Open Access and Open Data” will feature Claudio Aspesi, Senior Research consultant and advisor to SPARC, coauthor of “The Changing Academic Publishing Industry – Implications for Academic Institutions.”

August 10, 2-3 p.m. “Publishing Data in Repositories” – more details to come.

 

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Read Source, the online newsletter, to learn about the news, events, people and happenings in UC Libraries.

sourceRead Source, the online newsletter, to learn about the news, events, people and happenings in UC Libraries.

In this issue of Source, Dean Xuemao Wang remarks on the national and global protests sparked off by the May 25th murder of George Floyd by Minneapolis police officers and how libraries must join the fight against systemic racism.

Read about how when UC Libraries closed its physical locations in mid-March in response to COVID-19, student supervisors transitioned quickly not just their own work online, but that of their library student workers. In addition, this issue highlights work to provide library services and resources online to UC faculty and staff during a crisis.

While working remotely, consider suggestions of resource and tools from Maggie Patel, business and data analytics librarian. Download Libraries backgrounds for your next Zoom meeting or spend time with the labor collections in the Archives and Rare Books Library.

Elizabeth Scarpelli, director of the University of Cincinnati Press, announces the launch of Platforms and Pathways in Social Innovation as part of the Press’s dynamic, open access publishing platform.

While the University of Cincinnati Libraries remains open and available online to provide users with access to library resources and services, the Click & Collect retrieval and pickup service allows UC users to request print library materials in the Library Catalog for pickup at designated library locations.

Lastly, in this issue of Source, we remind UC faculty and staff to submit their 2019 creative and scholarly works for including in the re-imagined Life of the Mind.

Read these articles, as well as past issues, on the web at http://libapps.libraries.uc.edu/source/ and via e-mail. To receive Source via e-mail, contact melissa.norris@uc.edu to be added to the mailing list.

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UC Libraries Expands Click & Collect Retrieval Service to Additional Library Locations

Users can request print library materials by 9am Wednesday for Thursday pickup.

click and collect graphicThe University of Cincinnati Libraries is expanding its Click & Collect retrieval and pickup service providing users with access to print collection materials in order to support UC teaching and research. Users may now request print items for pickup at the following additional library locations:

  • College of Engineering and Applied Science (CEAS) Library
  • College of Education, Criminal Justice, and Human Services (CECH) Library
  • Geology-Mathematics-Physics Library
  • Walter C. Langsam Library

Plans are underway to provide access to the John Miller Burnam Classics Library collection to Classics faculty and graduate students and details will be announced soon.

The Click & Collect retrieval and pickup service allows UC users to request print library materials in the Library Catalog for pickup at designated library locations. Requests made by 9am Wednesdays will be available for pickup between noon-4pm on Thursdays. Due dates have been automatically set for August 10. When searching for print materials in the Library Catalog, items with the status of “Held By Library” are available for request. Items from one library location cannot be requested for pickup at another library location. Continue reading UC Libraries Expands Click & Collect Retrieval Service to Additional Library Locations

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Dorcas Washington takes on new role of data analytics specialist on the Research and Data Services Team

dorcas washingtonDorcas Washington, formerly content analyst on the Content Services Team, has transitioned to the new role of data analytics specialist on the Research and Data Services (RDS) Team.

In her new role, Dorcas will provide leadership and expertise in the areas of quantitative and qualitative data analysis, as well as play a leading role in developing and executing a research reproducibility support program across disciplines. Dorcas holds a BA in mathematics, an MS in applied statistics with a concentration in bio-statistics and has recently been accepted into UC’s PhD program for environmental health: bio-statistics. In her new role, she will be able to utilize her knowledge and skill set to its fullest and to build upon her experiences gained as a member of the Content Services Team.

As data analytics specialist, Dorcas will be responsible for:

  • Leading library services related to the evaluation, manipulation and visualization of data and the use of statistical tools
  • Developing and delivering scalable research and data-related services and resources in collaboration with RDS, with the Digital Scholarship Center, and others as appropriate
  • Leading the development and implementation of consultation and instruction services for statistical and analytical methods
  • Promoting best practices for ethical and reproducible data production, analysis and dissemination
  • Developing and coding executable programs to automate processes to perform computational inquiries
  • Co-managing Informatics Lab operations within the Donald C. Harrison Health Sciences Library.

“I look forward to getting back to my roots of mathematics and statistics by utilizing those skills to help people further research at UC,” said Dorcas. “This position interested me because it’s doing work I enjoy with a diverse group of people (students, faculty, staff and more).”

Those interested in services, should contact RDS via e-mail askdata@uc.edu.

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Eula Bingham 1929-2020

Staff here at the Winkler Center were saddened to hear of the passing over the weekend of great friend and supporter, Eula Bingham. Her long and illustrious career bespoke a dedication to and undying support of American laborers and their right to work in safe and healthy conditions. In addition, she was steadfast in her commitment to research, students, and the Department of Environmental Health in the College of Medicine here at the University of Cincinnati.

Eula Bingham was born on farm near Covington, Kentucky in 1929. After receiving her Bachelor of Science degree in chemistry and biology at Eastern Kentucky University, she began her career at the University of Cincinnati (UC) as a graduate student in 1955. It was as a graduate student that she worked as a technician at the Kettering Laboratory under her mentor Dr. Robert Kehoe. There she did research in the toxicology division of what later became the Department of Environmental Health in the College of Medicine.

Upon receiving her PhD in Zoology and Physiology from UC with minors in Ecology and Biochemistry in 1958, she was appointed Assistant Professor in the College of Medicine. Her research in toxicology continued with an emphasis in chemical carcinogens. Eventually Dr. Bingham’s pioneering research merged with her growing concern with workplace exposure to cancer causing chemical agents.

Her interest in worker safety and health lead to her participation in numerous national efforts in protecting workers. In the 1970s, union advocates and leaders like Tony Mazzochi sought her expert opinion in legislative issues. Dr. Bingham’s growing reputation led to her inclusion, and leadership appointments, on several Department of Labor, Department of Energy, and other federal committees.  As a result, she was asked by President Jimmy Carter in 1977 to lead the Occupational, Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) as Assistant Secretary of Labor—the first woman to lead the department. While there, she was instrumental in developing standards and training for workers, unions, and management on workplace hazards.

She returned to the University of Cincinnati as Vice President (VP) of Research and Graduate Studies (1981-1990). During this tenure, she maintained her research interests, continued to publish in the field of industrial health, and was instrumental in petitioning state legislatures to enforce labeling standards on hazardous materials in the workplace. Upon leaving the VP position, she returned to research and authored numerous grants. One of these, was to perform a study at the Oakridge National Laboratory in Tennessee where for almost a half century workers had been exposed to radiation, mercury, and other hazardous and cancer causing materials. Results of the study led to legislation providing for free healthcare, testing, and screenings for workers affected through the years, and the safe removal of contaminants from the facility.

Eula Bingham retired in 2000 as Professor Emerita, Environmental Health, College of Medicine. She maintained an office at UC, and was a frequent visitor to and vigilant supporter of the Winkler Center and its activities. We will miss her livelty spirit and constant spark. In the spring of 2018, Dr. Bingham graciously sat for an oral history conducted by honors students of HST 3097, an honors seminar course titled “Bearcat Legacies.” The project was done in cooperation with the University of Cincinnati Emeriti Faculty History Project. Please follow the video links for parts one and two  of the interview for more on her life and work.

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UC Libraries launches Click & Collect service to offer phased access to library print materials

Request library materials by 9:00 am Wednesday for Thursday pickup at select locations.

click and collect graphicBeginning immediately, the University of Cincinnati Libraries is providing users with phased access to print collection materials in order to support UC teaching and research.

The Click & Collect retrieval and pickup service allows UC users to request printed library materials in the Library Catalog for pickup at designated locations. Requests made by 9:00 AM Wednesdays will be available for pickup between noon – 4:00 PM on Thursdays. Due dates have been automatically set for August 10.

At this time, Click & Collect is available for print collections in the Albino Gorno Memorial (CCM) Library, the Robert A. Deshon and Karl J. Schlachter Library for Design, Architecture, Art and Planning (DAAP), the Donald C. Harrison Health Sciences Library and to some degree the Archives and Rare Books Library (see details below).

Plans to expand the Click & Collect library collection retrieval service are underway for other library locations and will be announced soon. Continue reading UC Libraries launches Click & Collect service to offer phased access to library print materials

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UC Clermont Library Trivia Results

UC Clermont Library hosted an online trivia tournament during May. We would like to thank everyone who participated! We hope you had fun with it and learned a little something about libraries or Cincinnati.

Check out the winner’s podium here!

Total correct answers: 51.4%
Total incorrect answers: 48.6%
Average score: 6182.7 points

According to Kahoot, the hardest two questions, both with only 28% correct answers, were the following:

#5. Which of these is Cincinnati’s oldest neighborhood? Avondale, Over the Rhine, Walnut Hills, or Columbia-Tusculum? The answer is Columbia-Tusculum, which was was founded in 1788 on the Little Miami River and predates Losantiville (which became Cincinnati) by a month.

#10. True or false, the last time the Cincinnati Bengals made it to the Superbowl was 1989. The answer is “true” – the last time the Bengals made it to the Superbowl was in ’89, but they lost to the San Francisco 49ers.

Coming up soon, be on the look out for more trivia from the library!

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Standing in solidarity against systemic racism

The University of Cincinnati Libraries supports our colleagues from the American Library Association and the Association of Research Libraries in their statements and actions against racism and violence perpetrated against black men and women and all people of color. We agree with President Neville Pinto’s message “that the time to act is now.” As libraries, we provide access to resources and information professionals so that citizens can educate themselves on how to contribute to meaningful change and combat systemic racism.

stamped from the beginningBelow is a short list of UC Libraries resources. While some do require UC affiliation, there are others that are open access. It contains a mix of current and historical perspectives as this is not a new issue our country is confronting, but the time to listen and to learn is now. This list is not meant to be comprehensive, but a starting point for education and conversation.  

Videos

Current exhibit on display in the Walter C. Langsam Library

women of the movement graphic

The Urban Studies Collection of the Archives and Rare Books Library holds information on two of the women featured in the exhibit, Louise Shropshire, originator of the Civil Rights anthem “We Shall Overcome,” and Marian Spencer, local Civil Rights icon, as well as Theodore “Ted” Berry, the first African American mayor of Cincinnati.

The University of Cincinnati Press

  • Issues in Race and Society, biannual journal distinguishes itself as an interdisciplinary, comprehensive, and global examination of the increasingly racial and racialized world that connects us all.
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