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And the Winners Are…Edible Books 2017

birth of photography

Best Overall – Capturing the List: The Birth of Photography by Ashleigh Schieszer

The University of Cincinnati Libraries celebrated the International Edible Books Festival for the 15th year on April 4, 2017.

Twenty-one students, librarians, and staff submitted entries that ranged from children’s books to literary classics to popular fiction and were made of cakes, cookies, candy, and even beans. Each entry was judged and awarded a bookmark. The winners are:

  • Most Photogenic – Ten Little Ladybugs by Melissa Cox Norris
  • Most Original – City of Bones by Michelle Burhans
  • Most Humorous – How to Eat Fried Worms by Tate Snyder
  • Most Whimsical – One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish by Sami Scheidler
  • Most Creative – The Manual of Detection by Jenny Mackiewicz
  • Most Beautiful – Uncle Monarch and the Day of the Dead by Elaine Ignatius
  • Most Magical – Charlotte’s Web by Michelle Wagner
  • Most Honorable – Lord of the Rings: One Ring to Rule Them All by Nicole Beletis
  • Most Adorable – Green Eggs and Ham by Sara Mihaly
  • Most Clever – The Creature from the Black Legume by Linda Newman
  • Most Gruesome – Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them by Jack Norris
  • Most Deadly – Girl on the Train by Holly Prochaska
  • Most Surprising – Twisted by Olga Hart
  • Most Mysterious – Heart of Darkness by Ben Kline
  • Most Scandalous – Fifty Shades of Grey by Jessica Burhans
  • Most Checked Out – Pizza for Breakfast by Lorna and Jerry Newman
  • Most Fun – Me Cookie by Sam Norris
  • Best Overall – Capturing the Light: The Birth of Photography by Ashleigh Schieszer
  • Best Student Entry – I Spy by Tate Snyder

Attendees enjoying the treats at Edible Books

Congratulations to all the edible books creators. View the entries and the winners on the UC Libraries Facebook page. See you next year for Edible Books 2018!

 

Welcome, Nick Wantsala, Technology and Equipment Specialist

We are pleased to announce that Nick Wantsala joined the Research, Teaching and Services (RTS) Department on March 27 as the technology and equipment specialist for The Desk @ Langsam.

Nick Wantsala

Nick Wantsala

Nick comes to UC…from UC. Nick joined the old Circulation and Multimedia Services Department in 2011 as a student assistant. He was promoted to senior student assistant during his time with the department and helped many fellow student assistants throughout the strategic merge of departments that resulted in The Desk @ Langsam. Nick has interned at Fox19 and was the president of the UC African Students Association. After graduating in 2015 with a degree in communications, Nick joined RTS as a temporary student supervisor, then became the temporary employee for the old equipment assistant position.

As the technology and equipment specialist, Nick will manage daily operations of the circulating equipment collection and the Center for Excellence in eLearning’s faculty and staff mobile technology collection. His primary responsibilities will be the circulation, maintenance, inventory, and the education of and communication with users in relation to these materials. Nick will also be collaborating with librarians working on eLearning and digital literacy, as well as providing user services Monday-Friday at The Desk @ Langsam. He will work with staff in RTS, ILS, the STRC, Library IT, and CEeL to further investigate and curate new technologies and devices that will best aid our students as they engage in cutting edge learning.

CCM Library Student Positions Available — Please Apply

The CCM Library is currently accepting applications for student assistants, for both the summer and fall semester.

Positions are open for:

  • staffing the Circulation Desk
  • maintaining the shelves

Positions require a commitment of at least 10–12 hours per week. Some positions require a federal Work/Study grant.

The library is conveniently located on the 6th floor of the Blegen Library building, next door to the CCM Village.

Please fill out the application form (pdf) and return to David Sandor, the Circulation Supervisor, CCM Library (600 Blegen Library)

email: david.sandor@uc.edu

A Few Calculators : Notes from the Oesper Collections, No. 43, March/April 2017

“Comptometer” hand-cranked mechanical calculator.

A circa 1930 American-made “Comptometer”
hand-cranked mechanical calculator.

Issue 43 gives a brief overview of some of the desktop and hand-held calculators used by chemists over the years and currently on display in the hallway outside of the Oesper Collections in Rieveschl Hall.

Click here for all other issues of Notes from the Oesper Collections and to explore the Jensen-Thomas Apparatus Collection.

 

 

 

 

Mozart in the Library: Act II

Ever wonder what people are playing while they are practicing the keyboard in Langsam and CCM Libraries? Jay Sinnard, manager of the Student Technology Resources Center, did so he asked one student if he could listen in.

Eliza Walsh

Eliza Walsh, Spanish major.

 

Can you identify what she’s playing? Bach? Beethoven?

A collaboration between UC Libraries and the College-Conservatory of Music (CCM), the keyboards are open to anyone wanting to play on a first come-first served basis, but bring your own headphone as they are required.

Provost Technology Innovation Award to Fund Data Visualization across Disciplines

The Provost Technology Innovation Award will fund visualization technology for faculty and students to communicate knowledge in graphical form.

data visualtion wall

Vendor supplied photograph of a data visualization wall.

The Office of the Provost has provided more than $1.3 million in funding to collaborating departments and groups across UC, helping each of them push the university community to new academic heights. UC Libraries, partnering with the College of Arts and Sciences, the College of Design, Architecture, Art and Planning, the Carl H. Lindner College of Business and IT@UC  was one of four Technology Innovation Award recipients recently announced with the successful proposal “Data Visualization Across Disciplines: Digital Literacy for the University of Cincinnati’s Third Century.” These partners will work together to invest in the development of an interdisciplinary undergraduate certificate in data visualization; training students to communicate complex data by placing it in a visual context. This cross-college program will incorporate coursework designed and team-taught by faculty, blending multiple perspectives on data visualization to a wide range of students. Data visualization is an emerging art and science that has changed people’s relationship with information. It harnesses new technologies to communicate knowledge in graphical form by merging aesthetic form with analytical function to present large and complex datasets in an intuitive and human-interpretable fashion.

From the Provost Office Announcement – As the University of Cincinnati moves toward its Bicentennial in 2019, the Office of the Provost supports academic and technological innovation keeping our university’s educational mission core to what we do and who we are at UC. This is the drive behind the Provost Technology Innovation Awards program, which funds projects developed by faculty and students who collaborate between colleges and discrete disciplines to support interdisciplinary projects that turn original ideas into reality. “At UC we have a strong, shared commitment to the continued modernization of the learning experience,” says Interim UC Provost Peter Landgren. “It is a pleasure to see the spirit of partnership change and improve the academic journey at the university through collaborative ideas like the ones funded through this program.”

Continue reading

Hungry? Bite into an Edible Book with UC Libraries

Celebrate books good enough to eat at the International Edible Books Festival set for 1 p.m., Tuesday, April 4, Langsam Library 5th floor lobby.

To Kill a Mockingbird

To Kill a Mockingbird

The University of Cincinnati Libraries will celebrate the International Edible Books Festival with an event scheduled from 1-2 p.m., on Tuesday, April 4, in the fifth floor lobby of Langsam Library.

At the event, nearly 20 participants will present their edible creations that represent a book in some form. There are few restrictions in creating an edible book – namely that the creation be edible and have something to do with a book. Submitted entries include edible titles such as “Me Cookie.” Best sellers “Fifty Shades of Grey” and “The Manual of Detection” are represented along with favorite children’s books “Charlotte’s Web,” “Ten Little Ladybugs” and “Where do Balloons Go?” among other literary greats.

Interested in creating an edible book? E-mail melissa.norris@uc.edu by Tuesday, March 28 with your name and the title of your creation. Continue reading

What do Pearl Jam and the Winkler Center for the History of the Health Professions have in common?

Not much I can assure you.  That said, recently we were performing a large scale book move to make room for newly cataloged monographs when I stumbled upon the book in the image below.

Vitalogy by E. H. Ruddock, M. D.

It was the cover that caught my eye because it seemed immediately familiar. Within a split second I realized that the cover of the book in question looked exactly like the cover of my favorite album by the band Pearl Jam.

Wait a second?  “Who’s Pearl Jam” you may be asking yourself. That’s OK. They are a rock and roll band from Seattle that broke around 1992. Released on Epic Records in the fall of 1994,Vitalogy was the band’s third album.  And as I’ve just found out, the title of a book.

Vitalogy Cover

I didn’t know it when the record was released, but the band chose the title because the lead singer/songwriter of the group, Eddie Vedder, saw the volume at a garage sale, liked it’s title, design, font, etc., and purchased it. He later showed it to the rest of the band and it soon became the title of the new album. The Vitalogy album/CD cover mimicked the cover of the book and original text from the book was used to populate the album’s liner notes.

 

Text

Textual diagram

So what about the book?  Vitalogy, An Encyclopedia of Health and Home Adapted for the Home, the Layman, and the Family by E. H. Ruddock, M.D. was first published in 1899; the edition we have is from 1926. Biblical in proportion it contains 1004 pages full of holistic cures, medical advice and proverbial wisdom. In addition, it is full of incredibly detailed and intricate color illustrations and fold outs.

Example of some of the detailed color foldouts

Glancing through its pages, one can imagine Vitalogy at home in any aisle of a Whole Foods or a Sprouts Market–the book that is, though I’m sure the album would do well there too.

 

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