Erin Rinto Joins UC Libraries as Teaching and Research Librarian

Today, Erin Rinto began work at UC Libraries as the new teaching and research librarian in the Research and Teaching Services Department located in the Walter C. Langsam Library. Erin comes to UC from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas where she was the teaching and learning librarian.  Over the past six years at UNLV, she worked to integrate information literacy outcomes into the general education program via sustainable, evidence-based approaches, thus providing her with extensive teaching and research experience. Erin’s primary responsibility will be working with the English Composition program, including serving on the cross-jurisdictional English Composition Committee.

Welcome to UC Libraries, Erin.

 

Bernstein, Shakespeare, Preservation Photographs and Dedicated Staff are All Featured in the Latest Issue of Source

source headerRead Source, the online newsletter, to learn more about the news, events, people and happenings in UC Libraries.

In this edition of Source we celebrate Leonard Bernstein at 100 with news of an exhibit on display in the Walter C. Langsam Library. Dean Xuemao Wang writes about how the occasion of the university’s upcoming Bicentennial has led him to reflect on the contributions of four staff members retiring this fall. We announce two grants received by the National Network of Libraries of Medicine that will promote good data and good health.

University archivist and head of the Archives and Rare Books Library Kevin Grace teaches readers and students in his honors class about Extra-Illustrated Editions. Jessica Ebert, lead photographic technician in the Preservation Lab writes about her work creating visual representations of the conservation treatments performed, and housing created, in the Lab. Mike Braunlin of the John Miller Burnam Classics Library offers his experience and insights gained working in the library for 42 years. The UC Foundation writes about a unique collection gifted to the Libraries from two former professors. Lastly, the annual Books by the Banks: Cincinnati USA Books Festival, of which UC Libraries is an organizing partner, is announced in this issue.

Read these articles, as well as past issues, on the web at http://libapps.libraries.uc.edu/source/ and via e-mail. To receive Source via e-mail, contact melissa.norris@uc.edu to be added to the mailing list.

Join Us in Celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month!

Hispanic Heritage Month is observed from September 15th to October 15th to honor the contributions and influences of Hispanic and Latinx cultures on America. Please browse our materials on display on the 4th floor of the Walter C. Langsam Library all month and join us for presentations on Spanish and Hispano-Arabic culture.

On Thursday, September 27th, from 11:30am -12:30pm, professor Frederic Cadora and professor Grace Thome will present, “The Arabic Spice Road,” discussing how not only spices made their way to Europe from the Arab World, but also other goods—linguistic and cultural—that linked the two regions for centuries. The presentation serves as a sample of the course, “Hispano-Arabic Culture, Literature, Music, and Architecture/Art,” which will be offered in spring semester of 2019. Thyme pies and rolled grape leaves will be served to exemplify the delicious impact of Hispano-Arabic culture.

On Thursday, September 27th, from 2:00pm – 3:00pm, professor Maria-Paz Moreno will present, “Tasking Power: The Bittersweet History of Chocolate” about the fascinating history of chocolate and the origins of this food and the myths around it. This presentation serves as a sample of the course “Food and Culture of Spain,” which will also be offered in spring semester of 2019. You will get the chance to sample several kinds of chocolate and cacao beans from different parts of the world to experience the variety chocolate has to offer.

Sponsored by the University of Cincinnati Libraries, the presentations will be held in the Digital Commons space located in the back of the 4th floor of the Langsam Library. They are free and open to the entire UC community. We hope to see you there!

Exhibit Celebrates Leonard Bernstein at 100

Bernstein Centennial Celebration
Performer. Composer. Teacher.
These three descriptions of world-renowned musician Leonard Bernstein, who was born 100 years ago this year, are celebrated in a new exhibit on display on the 4th floor lobby of the Walter C. Langsam Library now through the end of the calendar year. The exhibit includes biographical and professional information about Bernstein, recordings, books and images. It corresponds with a display in the Albino Gorno Memorial (CCM) Library of additional Bernstein materials and recordings.

ccm displayThe exhibit was designed by UC Libraries communication co-op student Sophia Yu with assistance from co-op student Sam Kane. It was curated by Jenny Doctor, head of the CCM Library, and Paul Cauthen, assistant music librarian, and produced by Melissa Cox Norris, director of library communications.

For more about Leonard Bernstein, read the full exhibit text below by Jenny Doctor. Interested in attending a Leonard Bernstein Concert, visit https://ccm.uc.edu/boxoffice/bernstein-festival.html, to learn about how CCM is celebrating Leonard Bernstein at 100! Continue reading Exhibit Celebrates Leonard Bernstein at 100

How UC Researchers use the Open Science Framework – UC Center for Police Research and Policy

In our second installment of the series “How UC Researchers use the Open Science Framework”, we hear from Hannah McManus, Gabrielle Isaza, and Clair Green-Schwartz, Research Associates with the IACP / UC Center for Police Research and Policy 

Hannah McManus, Gabrielle Isaza, and Clair Green-Schwartz, Research Associates with the IACP / UC Center for Police Research and Policy

Research Project Description or statement about your research interest

The International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP)/University of Cincinnati (UC) Center for Police Research and Policy engages in rigorous research that has practical implications for the field and is intended to serve as a national model for the way law enforcement agencies and researchers work together to help protect communities, safeguard citizens’ rights, and ensure the fair treatment of all individuals.

There is currently a gap between research and practice, and the IACP/UC Center for Police Research and Policy seeks to play an important role in closing that gap. Often times existing research does not provide actionable recommendations that can be easily translated into specific, practical policies and practices that could enhance policing. Moreover, academic researchers often do not have access to all the data that police departments have that is necessary to conduct rigorous and meaningful research on police practices. The goal of the IACP/UC Center for Police Research and Policy is to provide a path for law enforcement and researchers to work together on studies that can drive future practices and policies.

Why did you chose to use the OSF to organize your research/projects?

The IACP/UC Center for Police Research and Policy is funded by the Laura and John Arnold Foundation (LJAF). The LJAF is committed to funding research that meets the most rigorous standards of quality and transparency. As such, we make public our preregistration document for each project, which involves describing the research design in detail before the statistical analyses are performed. Further, we update the Center’s OSF profile as we gather more information on individual projects, and submit all applicable research materials onto the OSF for public viewing. At the end of our research projects, we include the findings either in the form of a written report or a link to a publication or preprint elsewhere. These findings must be freely available in some form, which removes the financial barriers that some may face when trying to access research. The Center’s OSF webpage thus provides a comprehensive overview of an entire research project from start to finish. And further, in the event that a research project does not lead to a peer-reviewed publication, posting the results at OSF serves a valuable informative purpose.

What about the OSF makes this tool a good choice for your project management (i.e. specific function of the OSF)?

The OSF is a useful web platform to centralize all parts of the project from initial idea to final results. It keeps a useful history of documents for us to track changes and progress over time. Ultimately, this tool is most useful in its ability to serve as a platform for transparency in research.

Please use this link for further detail about the Center for Police Research and Policy’s research projects:

https://osf.io/f2drv/

Rebecca Olson Joins UC Libraries as Business and Social Sciences Informationist

Today, Rebecca Olson joined UC Libraries as business and social sciences informationist. Rebecca has many years of experience as a law librarian. She was certified in 2018 in School Media from Southern Connecticut State University.  Prior to beginning her career in libraries, Rebecca received her MLS from Indiana University and her BA from the University of Connecticut.

Rebecca’s main responsibilities will be to develop and deliver innovative research and instructional services to the UC communities in business and the social sciences. She will work collaboratively with business and social science faculty and with UC Libraries faculty and staff to design, develop and implement a suite of cohesive services for faculty and students in business and the social sciences for data access, management and preservation.

Welcome to UC Libraries, Rebecca!

 

 

Dean’s Corner: End of Summer 2018

As you know, I spent the last week of August in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia for the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) World Library and Information Congress (WLIC). When I returned, I met with my senior leadership for a day long retreat at Hueston Woods near Oxford, Ohio. I gave updates on my planning thoughts for UC Libraries’ newest strategic endeavors, we reflected on the new opportunities and challenges we may face in the upcoming year and talked about further alignment with UC’s Next Lives Here directions. We also spent time bringing the two new members of my senior leadership team, Associate Dean for Library Services Brad Warren and Associate Director of Business Affairs Jeremy Berberich, up to speed. We ended the day with dinner with a special guest, Jerome Conley, the Dean of the Miami University Libraries.

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Tell Us About Your Research Practices and Needs

In order for the University of Cincinnati Libraries to provide the best possible research and data support services, we would like to encourage all faculty, staff and students to participate in a brief survey regarding your research practices and needs.

Taking part in this survey is completely voluntary, but your participation will help us to continue and create more meaningful services centered around your research and data needs. If you agree to participate, please complete the survey via the URL provided to give us more information about your primary research area, the type of data used for your research, and the assistance sought to deal with your data. We appreciate your time and look forward to serving you.

https://redcap.research.cchmc.org/surveys/?s=NAAAF33RH4

Workshops on Research Reproducibility

Research Reproducibility Workshops

workshops facilitator April Clyburne-Sherin
workshops facilitator April Clyburne-Sherin

UC Libraries and IT@UC are pleased to offer two workshops on Research Reproducibility as part of the Data and Computational Science Series.  We are partnering with Code Ocean to offer these workshop on Oct 3rd and 4th.  The workshops facilitator is April Clyburne-Sherin from Code Ocean.  April is an epidemiologist, methodologist and expert in open science tools, methods, training and community stewardship. She holds an MS in Population Medicine (Epidemiology). Since 2014, she has focused on creating curriculum and running workshops for scientists in open and reproducible research methods and is co-author of FOSTER’s Open Science Training Handbook. She is currently the Director of Scientific Outreach for the reproducibility platform Code Ocean.  Code Ocean (https://codeocean.com/) is a cloud-based computational reproducibility platform that provides researchers and developers an easy way to share, discover and run code published in academic journals and conferences.  Their mission is to make the world’s scientific code more reusable, executable and reproducible.  More information and registration for the workshops can be found at the links below.  Questions?  Email AskData@UC.Edu.  The events are free and open to all.

Workshop 1 — East Campus, Biomedical and Clinical Focus

URL – https://webapps2.uc.edu/ce/FacDev/Workshops/Details/11432

Title: Integrating reproducible best practices into biomedical and clinical research: A hands-on workshop for researchers – Data And Computational Science Series

Date: Wednesday, Oct. 3, 1 – 3pm

Location: Troup Learning Space Conf Rm-MSB G005G

Workshop 2 — West Campus, General Audience

URL – https://webapps2.uc.edu/ce/FacDev/Workshops/Details/11433

Title: Preparing your data and code for reproducible publication: A hands-on workshop for researchers – Data And Computational Science Series

Date: Thursday, Oct. 4, 10am – 12pm

Location: CEAS Library Classroom 850D Baldwin

DCS2 CodeOcean_flyerV2