‘Indigenous Dispossession.’ UC Libraries exhibit highlights laws, treaties and policies that resulted in mass Indian Removal

In honor of Native American Heritage Month, the University of Cincinnati Libraries’ RESPECT (Racial Equity Support Programming to Educate the Community Team), presents the exhibit “Indigenous Dispossession: U.S. laws & policies promoting European settlement and Western Expansion resulting in Indian Removal from tribal, ancestral lands.”

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Rant Che Wai Me. From the McKenney and Hall digital collection.

On display on the 4th floor lobby of the Walter C. Langsam Library, the exhibit begins by listing the justification for European Settlement on Native American lands through the Doctrine of Discovery and Manifest Destiny, the ideas that the United States is destined to expand its dominion and to spread democracy and capitalism across the entire North American continent. The exhibit then goes on to list laws and acts such as the Northwest Ordinance, Indian Removal Act and the General Allotment Act that all contributed to the removal of Native American peoples from their tribal homes. It also includes information on the Indian Civilization Act, which aimed to “civilize” and “Christianize” Native children. What resulted was a loss of their culture and identity and a system of abuse.

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Ne Sou A Quoit – A Fox Chief. From McKenney and Hall digital collection.

The second part of the exhibit, on display on the 5th floor lobby, outlines steps to rectify the early treatment of Native Americans by granting citizenship and ending allotment of tribal lands with such policies as the Indian Citizenship Act, the Indian Reorganization Act and the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act. It is noted, however, that while legislation around self-determination and self-governance offers a certain degree of independence and protection under the law, the legacy of displacement, oppression and neglect in American public policy affects Native communities and families to this day.

The exhibit highlights the collections of UC Libraries by featuring prominently illustrations from George Catlin who traveled the North American continent from 1830-1838 to chronicle the people, customs and traditions of Native American tribes and from Thomas Loraine McKenney and James Hall’s “History of the Indian Tribes of North America.”

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From George Catlin’s “The Printed Works.”

To learn more, a bibliography of works from the collections of UC Libraries is available in print at the exhibit and online as a PDF.

The exhibit helps the RESPECT group in their mission to draw awareness of Systemic Racism, defined as “policies and practices that exist throughout a whole society or organization, and that result in and support a continued, unfair advantage to some people and unfair or harmful treatment of others based on race.”

UC Libraries closed Friday, Nov. 11 for Veterans Day

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UC Libraries will be closed Friday, Nov. 11 in observance of Veterans Day.

Regular library hours will resume Saturday, Nov. 12.

To learn more about veterans at UC, check out this online exhibit from the Archives and Rare Books Library entitled “School & Country: Military Life at the University of Cincinnati.”

Read Source for the news, events, people and happenings in UC Libraries

source graphicRead Source, the online newsletter, to learn about the news, events, people and happenings in UC Libraries.

In this issue of Source, we document the record number of students visiting and studying in the Walter C. Langsam Library this fall and feature the services and resources available in the Albino Gorno Memorial (CCM) Library. We spotlight Hannah Harper, a student worker in the Science and Engineering Libraries and the generous support of retired University of Cincinnati professors Laura and Richard Kretschmer.

Fall semester is a busy time for events in the Libraries. The Robert A. Deshon and Karl J. Schlachter Library for Design, Architecture, Art and Planning (DAAP) are displaying selections from the library’s collection about hair. Our upcoming Poetry Stacked series, scheduled for Oct. 19, will raise awareness of the collections of both UC Libraries and the Elliston Poetry Room by engaging students and others in attendance with UC and community poets, including a student poet. On Thursday, Oct. 20 the College of Education, Criminal Justice and Human Services (CECH) Library is hosting a talk by Dr. Debbie Reese, noted children’s literature scholar, former classroom teacher, and founder/co-editor of the American Indians in Children’s Literature blog.

Read these articles, as well as past issues, on the website. To receive Source via e-mail, contact melissa.norris@uc.edu to be added to the mailing list.

Selecting Books and Materials About Native Peoples for Your Library or Classroom with Dr. Debbie Reese — Free Zoom lecture

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Societal changes in recent years have been unsettling to people who seek accurate and authentic materials for their libraries and classrooms. What should be added to the shelves? And, what should be set aside?

Join the College of Education, Criminal Justice and Human Services (CECH) Library for an evening with Dr. Debbie Reese, noted children’s literature scholar, former classroom teacher, and founder/co-editor of the American Indians in Children’s Literature blog. Dr. Reese will offer suggestions on how to move forward — with confidence. This dynamic lecture will be centered on children’s and young adult books and materials about Native peoples.

Tribally enrolled at Nambé Pueblo, Dr. Debbie Reese has studied representations of Native peoples in children’s and young adult books for over 30 years. Her book chapters, journal articles, and professional writings are taught in education, library science, and English courses across the United States and Canada. Her blog is widely recognized as a go-to resource for writers, reviewers, editors, teachers, librarians, and parents.

Date/time: Thursday, October 20th @ 6:30pm via Zoom

Use our RSVP form to register today!

This lecture is sponsored by the Kretschmer Fund for Native American Children’s Literature.

Looking Back, Moving Ahead: A Brief Review of 2021-22 in the CECH Library

Welcome to fall semester, CECH friends! Though we’ve been open all summer, the CECH Library is so pleased to open our doors yet again to students, faculty, and staff at the beginning of another promising school year.  

 Like you, we’ve had a busy year – full of projects, planning, and reflection. Here are a few highlights: 

As always, you can find fall semester library hours on the CECH Library website, as well as a complete listing of hours across UC Libraries locations 

It is our pleasure to serve CECH, and we wish you all a fantastic semester. 

Katie Foran-Mulcahy
CECH Library Head + Interim Assistant Dean 

Fall Space Refresh in the CECH Library

In preparation for the fall term, we completed a comprehensive space refresh on our library’s 3rd floor, including moving more than 26,800 books (by hand!) to make our highest-circulating collections more visible and accessible.  

We also re-designed our 3rd floor display spaces, creating more permanent areas to promote books and refreshing exhibits monthly.  

In addition, our MakerLab underwent a re-organization this summer to improve users’ experience. Rachel Hoople, CECH Library’s Operations Manager, led many of these changes and I know our students will reap the benefits of these improvements this year. 

We can’t wait for you to come visit us this year to check out our refreshed spaces. As always, you can find fall semester library hours on the CECH Library website, as well as a complete listing of hours across UC Libraries locations 

 It is our pleasure to serve CECH, and we wish you all a fantastic semester. 

Katie Foran-Mulcahy
CECH Library Head + Interim Assistant Dean 

Seeing the Story in the Data Series – Frank Elavsky

logo for the Data and Computational Science Series 20200

JOIN us for the third in a four part data visualization series entitled:

Seeing the Story in the Data

A well thought out and designed visualization can convey meaning and deep insight into vast amounts of data.  In this four part lecture series, data visualization researchers and experts will discuss visualizations from different disciplines and highlight choices made to find the “so what”.

This series is a part of the Data and Computational Science Series.

Our next Speaker is Frank Elavsky from Carnegie Mellon University.  The talk is entitled Dat Visualization Accessilibilty and will focus on making data visualizations accessible to all users especially people with disabilities.  This is a headshot of Frank Elavsky. They are standing against a brickwall. They are wearing glasses

Title: The Role of Data Visualization in Science and Computational Science

Date: September 1, 2022

Time: 9:30 pm – 11:00 am EST

Venue: The Visualization Lab in GMP Library (240H Braunstein Hall)

Registration: link to faculty one stop

This free event is hosted by UC Libraries Research and Data Serivces and the Office of Research – Research Computing and Data and funded by the Office of the Provost Universal Provider Grant and is open to all.

Updates to Libraries website for fall semester

screen shot of updated libraries websiteNext week, UC Libraries will make updates to the website in order to improve usability and discoverability, as well as to simplify navigation. These changes are reflective of results from user testing, analytics and edit requests received throughout the year. Where possible, redirects will be included, but please note new URLs listed below and update any bookmarks as necessary.

Updates include:

Please note, other library resources, including Summon, the Library Catalog and Library Guides integration into Canvas, have had or will also have updates. If you use these resources in your courses or research, we also recommend checking that your links, bookmarks and information are still up to date.

As always, contact us with questions.

Read Source for the news, events, people and happenings in UC Libraries

source graphic

Read Source, the online newsletter, to learn about the news, events, people and happenings in UC Libraries.

In this issue of Source, we bid goodbye and fond farewell to Dean Xuemao Wang as he ends his tenure at the University of Cincinnati. We celebrate the announcement of Lori Harris as interim dean and university librarian and ask her some questions about her aspirations and hopes for her new role. We feature the work of P. Alfred Marchand, one of the first Black librarians in the United States, and the design work of 1911 UC graduate Valentine Barker. Finally, we spotlight the excellent resources and services available in the College of Education, Criminal Justice, and Human Services (CECH) Library.

Read these articles, as well as past issues, on the website. To receive Source via e-mail, contact melissa.norris@uc.edu to be added to the mailing list.