Health Sciences Library Services

The Donald C. Harrison Health Sciences Library (HSL) and UC Libraries provide services in addition to journals, books, databases and research guides.  These services include:

  • Monthly classes in the HSL Troup Learning Space – register to attend a variety of classes from REDCap, to Literature Searching, to presentation software like Prezi or Emaze, to citation management systems RefWorks and EndNote.
  • Informatics Lab – reserve this collaborative hands-on learning space where you can work with software like SPSS, SAS, R, Matlab, Satscan, Python, Photoshop and more. Get assistance with statistical work or meet with a Writing Center tutor.
  • Winkler Center Lucas Board Room – reserve this space for meetings or events
  • HSL Computer Lab – use the computers available or your own laptops/devices, get assistance with setting up secure wireless, email and more.
  • Poster Printing – located in the HSL and available to all Academic Health Center students.
  • Data Management Planning – information about DMP. Contact us for assistance with managing research data, preparing a data management plan for a grant submission and more.
  • Scholar@UC – a digital repository that enables the UC community to share research and scholarly work with a worldwide audience.

Want to know more?

 

Langsam Library Exhibit Marks the 500th Anniversary of the Reformation

martin luther
Martin Luther

In 1517, Martin Luther wrote his 95 theses criticizing the practice of indulgences of the Catholic church. He was disturbed by the fact that the faithful were allowed to offer money as penance for their sins. The publication of the 95 theses is considered as the starting point of the Reformation, which marks its 500th anniversary on October 31, 1517, the date long assumed that Luther nailed his theses to the door of the Castle Church at Wittenberg.

A new exhibit on display on the 4th floor lobby of the Walter C. Langsam Library, as well as spread throughout the 4th floor of the library, highlights the complex and multifaceted legacy of the Reformation. It combines publications from the University of Cincinnati Libraries’ collections and the poster exhibition “Here I Stand. Martin Luther, the Reformation and its Results.” Included in the exhibit is a list of other Cincinnati events that commemorate the 500th anniversary of the Reformation (listed below). The exhibit was curated by Richard Schade, professor emeritus of German studies in the College of Arts and Sciences, and Olga Hart, coordinator of library instruction in the Research and Teaching Services Department and German subject librarian. It was designed and produced by Sami Scheidler, summer communications co-op design student from the College of Design, Architecture, Art and Planning, and Melissa Cox Norris, director of library communications.

95 thesesMartin Luther, and the movement he triggered in 1517, remain central topics in the history of the Western civilization. The Reformation forever altered the face of Europe. Century-old institutions disappeared, to be replaced by new ones. Borders changed, national churches emerged and religious tensions erupted into global conflicts. The Reformation’s positive repercussions can be seen in the intellectual and cultural flourishing it inspired on all sides of the schism—in the strengthened universities of Europe, the Lutheran church music of J.S. Bach, the baroque altarpieces of Peter Paul Rubens and even the capitalism of Dutch Calvinist merchants. The exhibit includes images of woodcuts, broadsheets, pamphlets and music that show the transmission of information and opinion during the Reformation. A Reformation Bibliography (PDF) of related library resources can be found at the exhibit and online.

Join us Monday, September 18, 3-5pm on the 4th floor of Langsam Library for an opening reception for the Reformation 500 exhibit. Brief remarks will be given by Dan Gottlieb, interim associate dean for public services for UC Libraries, Richard Schade, Martin Wilhelmy, honorary consulate for Germany in Cincinnati, and Herbert Quelle, consulate general for Germany.

invite

Continue reading Langsam Library Exhibit Marks the 500th Anniversary of the Reformation

Get the FACTS at Clermont College Library

Have you ever read fake news? Most of us have.

As a college student writing research papers you want the correct facts. One way to search and find facts is to use the databases available through the library and seek assistance from one of our reference librarians.

The International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions has some great tips for spotting fake news.

As a reminder to get your facts from reliable sources, we’re giving away FACTS t-shirts.

Sign up in the library before September 22 for a chance to win!

Penny McGinnis
Technical Services Manager

Call for Nominations for the Fall 2017 Featured UC Faculty ‘Life of the Mind’ Presenter

The Nov. 14 lecture will celebrate UC faculty research, scholarship and creative output and foster the free and open exchange of ideas and discourse.

Life of the Mind LogoLife of the Mind, started in spring 2011, is an annual lecture series featuring interdisciplinary conversations with UC faculty from a variety of disciplines around a one-word theme. The fall lecture, scheduled for 3-5 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 14 will focus on the theme of “truth.”

Life of the Mind lectures feature one faculty member presenting his or her work and expertise in concert with the prescribed theme. The presentation is not simply be a recitation of the presenter’s work but promotes a point of view. A panel of three responds to and discusses the lecture from diverse perspectives, and a moderator encourages audience engagement.

The Life of the Mind Steering Committee seeks nominations for the featured UC faculty presenter. Each featured UC faculty presenter possesses:

  • Accomplished UC faculty member with national/international reputation.
  • Proven record of scholarship or creative works.
  • Recognized as an expert in their field of study, research or creation of works.
  • Experienced at presenting their work to an audience outside the classroom.
  • Excellent and engaging speaker able to relate to a non-specialist audience.
  • Provocative topic of study/research/creative work.

Continue reading Call for Nominations for the Fall 2017 Featured UC Faculty ‘Life of the Mind’ Presenter

Most UC Libraries Closed Labor Day, September 4

labor dayUC Libraries will be closed Monday, September 4 for Labor Day, except for the Donald C. Harrison Health Sciences Library, which will be open 9am-5pm. This closing includes the Langsam Library 4th floor space, which will close Sunday, September 3 at 11pm and re-open Tuesday, September 5 at 7:45am.

A complete listing of library hours can be found online at www.libraries.uc.edu/about/hours.html.

Enjoy the long holiday weekend.

An Environmental Legacy

By:  Eira Tansey

Bob MarshallOver the last couple years, I’ve been exploring the relationship between record keeping, archives, and environmental policy. Right now, I’m shifting my research gears towards the role of recordkeeping practices in the formulation and enforcement of environmental policy.

To understand how we’ve arrived at today’s environmental problems and policies, it’s helpful to go back to the past and look at one of the most influential periods of federal action on natural resource protection. During Roosevelt’s New Deal, major environmental protection projects were undertaken, as well as the introduction of a major federal regulatory state. The Civilian Conservation Corps employed thousands of young men to build trails and buildings still in use today, as well as undertaking environmental restoration projects such as reforestation. While most of today’s major federal environmental laws have their roots in the 1970s, the legal foundation for federal action to be taken on issues that no state can resolve on its own can be traced back to many New Deal-era regulations. Continue reading An Environmental Legacy

The Graduate School Extols the Benefits of Scholar@UC

scholar@uc

A recent article by Danniah Daher, graduate assistant to the Graduate School Office, entitled Scholar@UC: The Archive You Need, talks about the need to preserve and protect scholarly work and research data by submitting it to the university repository. Linda Newman, head of digital collections and repositories, is quoted as saying, “The mission of Scholar@UC is to preserve the permanent intellectual output of UC…We are very serious about preservation. We’re also very serious about access. We want to make the content accessible—content that otherwise would just be sitting on someone’s hard drive in their office. We consider preservation and access our two most important jobs.”

The full article can be read online at http://grad.uc.edu/student-life/news/scholaratuc.html.

Available at https://scholar.uc.edu/, Scholar@UC is a digital repository that enables the University of Cincinnati community to share its research and scholarly work with a worldwide audience. Faculty and staff can use Scholar@UC to collect their work in one location and create a durable and citeable record of their papers, presentations, publications, datasets, or other scholarly creations. Students, through an approved process, may contribute capstone projects such as senior design projects, theses, and dissertations.

The mission of Scholar@UC is to preserve the permanent intellectual output of UC, to advance discovery and innovation, to foster scholarship and learning through the transformation of data into knowledge, to collect a corpus of works that can be used for teaching and to inspire derivative works, and to enhance discoverability and access to these resources.

Finding Music Materials in the Music Library

By its very nature music can be a challenge to find in any organized space, not just the music library.  The Library has two guides that we hope will help make your searches for music in our library easier and more often successful. In the menu of our Library Guides they are Finding Music Materials and How to Use Online Catalog.

And as always, feel free to ask our library staff for assistance whenever you have a question or for help finding anything you need or are looking for in our Library.