The Surviving Legacies of Early Spain or Influences in Early Spanish History

By:  Savannah Gulick, Archives & Rare Books Library Student Assistant

Roman Aqueduct in SegoviaAs a Spanish and International Affairs major, travel, global politics, and reading have always been of interest to me. Fortunately, our Archives & Rare Books Library contains an extensive collection on early exploration and travel accounts.  Just having recently returned from Spain, I want to focus this blog on a few of the Spanish-centered accounts.  For most people, Spanish history is often minimized to a few events: Christopher Columbus’ discovery of the Americas and the dictatorship under Franco. Because of this, I want to highlight other important centuries of Spanish history while pulling some  illustrations and details from our various books.

Spanish history is full of wars amongst powerful nations (Roman, Moorish), famous people (Seneca, Trajan), and important discoveries (antiseptics, modern surgery). Owning Spain was important to trading, resource extraction, and crucial routes A door in the Alcazar Cathedralbetween Europe and Africa. One such empire that realized the value of Spain and would hold power of the area for centuries was Rome. To this day, the Roman impact on Spain is still evident: Segovian Aqueduct as illustrated in Edward Locker’s Views of Spain (1824) continues to provide water; Roman law; Christianity; the Romance language of Spanish;  and the prevalence of olive oil and wine in the cuisine.

Following Roman rule, the Moors from North Africa arrived and claimed land in the southern peninsula. From the architecture to the language, and even the agriculture, the Moors shaped a significant part of Spain’s history much like Rome. The exquisite palace, Alcazar of Seville, remains one of the greatest and most beautiful examples of Islamic architecture. The same architectural style can also be seen in the Great Mosque of Cordoba. S. P. Scott’s Through Spain: A Narrative of Travel and Adventure in the Peninsula (1886) highlights the impressive beauty of the Alcazar and the Mosque.

the Great Mosque of CordobaDuring the Middle Ages, both types of architecture (Roman and Moorish) alongside newer styles from the ruling Hapsburgs or Bourbons would create iconic cathedrals, palaces, and public buildings. One example of this mixture of architectural styles is the La Seo Cathedral in Zaragoza. Although it is hard to see in the stone etching of the cathedral from Locker’s Views of Spain (1824), the structure contains a Romanesque apse, a Baroque tower, Mudejar exterior walls, and a Gothic altarpiece. The conglomeration of multiple styles illustrates the diverse and rich history of Spain and highlights the acceptance of cultural differences that was evident throughout much of the nation’s history – minus a few dark periods, of course.

Zaragoza CathedralFor more information about early exploration of Spain or other travel accounts, visit the Archives & Rare Books Library on the 8th floor of Blegen Library.  We are open Monday through Friday, 8:00 am-5:00 pm.  You can also call us at 513.556.1959, email us at archives@ucmail.uc.edu, visit us on the web at. http://www.libraries.uc.edu/arb.html, or have a look at our Facebook page,  https://www.facebook.com/ArchivesRareBooksLibraryUniversityOfCincinnati.

ASTM Compass Now Available

ASTM Compass Logo

 

 

 

UC Libraries now has a subscription to ASTM Compass, which includes all ASTM standards, journals and STPs (Special Technical Publications).  Access to standards includes both current and historical versions.

ASTM standards and publications cover many topics: consumer products, science, design, architecture, engineering, 3D printing, medical devices, etc.  Go to  https://www.astm.org/Standards/category_index.html to see an entire list of standards by category.

To access go to https://compass.astm.org/CUSTOMERS/index.html .  If you are off-campus, log in to the UC VPN: http://libraries.uc.edu/off-campus-access.html

Some help using the COMPASS platform:

Checking Out the Chicago Public Library: UCBA Librarian Visits the Harold Washington Library Center

One a recent July 4th holiday visit to Chicago, Michelle McKinney, UCBA Reference and Web Services librarian, made a brief stop at the Harold Washington Library Center (HWLC) of the Chicago Pubic Library (CPL). The main branch of CPL is located on 400 S. State Street, Chicago, IL 60605 in the South Loop. The building is a site to behold. It is 10 stories high, 756,000 square feet, and takes up a full city block. Here are just a few photos from Michelle’s all-too-brief visit. Follow the links at the end of the post to learn more about the Chicago Public Library and the Harold Washington Library Center. Continue reading

Dr. Christian R. Holmes, The Cincinnati General Hospital, and the Surgical Amphitheater

By: Nathan Hood

CR HolmesPainting

Portrait of Dr. Christian R. Holmes that hung in the General Hospital’s Administration building for many years. This photo serves as a link to the blog, “Major Christian R. Holmes’ Involvement at Camp Sherman.”

 Dr. Christian R. Holmes is credited with numerous contributions not only to science and medicine in general, but also to medical education. Indeed, he is remembered not only for his expertise in Otolaryngology and Ophthalmology, but also for his profound influence on the history of the University of Cincinnati’s Medical College and it’s collaboration with the surrounding municipal hospitals – Cincinnati’s General Hospital in particular. For this reason, some unhesitatingly compare him to the famed Dr. Daniel Drake who first established the Medical College and soon after more-or-less effectuated the creation of the Cincinnati General Hospital’s institutional with the intention of their collaboration.

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In Honor of Joseph F. Kowalewski

By: Richard A. Puff and Nathan A. Hood

Joseph F. Kowalewki (1)

Joseph F. Kowalewski.
This photograph serves as a link to a video interview of
Dr. Kowalewski conducted by Jim Myers in 1986.

CINCINNATI—On June 23, 2015, The University of Cincinnati Board of Trustees approved renaming the Health Professions Building as Joseph F. Kowalewski Hall in honor of the former dean of the university’s pharmacy school.

Kowalewski served as dean of the College of Pharmacy from 1949 to 1970. He was the last dean of the school when it was the Cincinnati College of Pharmacy, an independent pharmacy school which first opened in 1850. Kowalewski also directed the merger of the school with the University of Cincinnati in 1954 to become the university’s 13th college. The college was renamed the James L. Winkle College of Pharmacy in 2007.

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The DAAP Library: New & improved meeting & study spaces!

The DAAP Library now has several group studies for you to use for group or individual study, meetings, presentations, reviews, and teaching!

On the main (500) level, there are two:

The Seminar Room at the DAAP Library

The Seminar Room: This instructional room seats 25-30 and is equipped with HD projection & a sound system, a new DVD/VHS player, and PC that you can use or disconnect to connect your own Mac or PC. The Seminar Room should be booked in advance by visiting or calling the main desk in the DAAP Library (556-1335).

 

The Eames Room at the DAAP Library

The Eames Room: As an homage to famed designers, Charles & Ray Eames, this room is fully appointed with Eames furniture manufactured by Herman Miller and Vitra. This room seats 12 and is also equipped with projection & sound, a DVD/VHS player, and a PC that you can use or disconnect to connect your own Mac or PC. You may reserve this room by signing up on the weekly sign-up sheet hanging outside the room itself, otherwise, it’s first come, first serve.

On the upper (600) level, there are two more rooms for your use:

The DAAPThinks Tank at the DAAP Library

The DAAPThinks Tank: This room is appointed with George Nelson chairs, an Eames table, and seats 12. You may reserve this room by signing up on the weekly sign-up sheet hanging outside the room itself, otherwise, it’s first come, first serve.

 

 

 

The Special Collection Reading Room at the DAAP Library

The Special Collections Reading Room: Like the DAAPThinks Tank, this room is appointed with George Nelson chairs, an Eames table, and seats 12. You may reserve this room by signing up on the weekly sign-up sheet hanging outside the room itself, otherwise, it’s first come, first serve.

A Look into the World of Landscape Architecture: The Myrl E. Bottomley Collection

By Janice Schulz

Myrl Bottomley

Professor Myrl E. Bottomley

In 1922, the College of Engineering and Commerce started a new degree program in Architecture that included a few classes in Landscape Design. The classes were well received, and when the Architecture Department moved to the newly created School of Applied Arts in 1925, a complete degree in Landscape Architecture was offered. With the growth of the Landscape program and the School of Applied Arts, a dedicated professor was needed to lead the Landscape Architecture program. Enter Professor Myrl Elijah Bottomley in 1926. A native of Michigan, Bottomley earned his Bachelor of Science degree from Michigan State College in 1916. He served in World War I as a lieutenant on the front lines in France, where, as a result of gas attacks, he developed health issues that would stay with him for the rest of his life. After returning from the war, he earned a Master of Landscape Design from Cornell University in 1922. Before coming to UC he served as Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture at Iowa State College from 1922-1925. Continue reading