Attending Wednesday’s Cecil Striker Lecture? Stay for a Book Signing of “Leaving a Legacy: Lessons from the Writings of Daniel Drake.”

leaving a legacy book coverThe Henry R. Winkler Center for the History of the Health Professions and the Cecil Striker Society for the History of Medicine will host the 10th Cecil Striker Society Annual Lecture from 5:00-7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, May 15, in the Kresge Auditorium, Medical Sciences Building, 231 Albert Sabin Way.

This year’s lecture, titled Daniel Drake’s Connection to Sir William Osler: Celebrating Two Medical Education Reformers, will focus on the immense impact both physicians had on medical education. Philip M. Diller, M.D., Ph.D., and Robert E. Rakel, M.D., will serve as co-lecturers for the event.

Following the lecture, author Philip M. Diller will be on hand outside the Winkler Center to sign copies of his recently published book, Leaving a Legacy: Lessons from the Writings of Daniel Drake.

As documented here in his own words from excerpts of lectures, personal journal entries, presentations, speeches, books and letters to his children, readers learn about the scope of Daniel Drake’s accomplishments in medicine, contributions to his community, and dedication to his family. Diller goes beyond biography to contextualize Drake’s life choices and what makes him a role model for today’s physicians. Diller selected 180 thematically arranged excerpts, which he paired with original reflection questions to guide the reader through thought-provoking prompts.

Leaving a Legacy was published by the University of Cincinnati Press.

Cecil Striker Society Annual Lecture Scheduled for May 15 to Celebrate Two Pioneers in Medical Education

cecil striker invite

The Henry R. Winkler Center for the History of the Health Professions and the Cecil Striker Society for the History of Medicine will host the 10th Cecil Striker Society Annual Lecture from 5:00-7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, May 15, in the Kresge Auditorium, Medical Sciences Building, 231 Albert Sabin Way.

This year’s lecture, titled Daniel Drake’s Connection to Sir William Osler: Celebrating Two Medical Education Reformers, will focus on the immense impact both physicians had on medical education. Philip M. Diller, M.D., Ph.D., and Robert E. Rakel, M.D., will serve as co-lecturers for the event. Continue reading Cecil Striker Society Annual Lecture Scheduled for May 15 to Celebrate Two Pioneers in Medical Education

A Brief Introduction of Dr. William A. Altemeier

I’ve already introduced myself, but it’s occurred to me that I haven’t introduced Dr. Altemeier, who is, after all, the reason I’m here.  I apologize for the delay; his full and eventful life has been a lot to sort through.  While processing Dr. Altermeier’s collection,I’ve become very familiar with his work, activities, and influence. I’m amazed at how much someone can accomplish in one lifetime!

William Arthur Altemeier was born in Cincinnati, Ohio on July 6, 1910 to William Arthur Altemeier, Sr. and Carrie Moore Altemeier. He graduated cum laude from Walnut Hills High School in 1927, and went on to the University of Cincinnati, earning his Bachelor of Science degree in 1930.  He continued at the University of Cincinnati, earning his Doctorate of Medicine in 1933.  While working on his residency at the Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit, MI, he earned a Master of Surgery degree from the University of Michigan in 1938.

He immediately began his teaching career while still in Detroit, as Associate Surgeon at the Henry Ford Hospital from 1939-1940, and then returned to the University of Cincinnati as Instructor in Surgery in 1940. Twelve years later in 1952, he was named the Christian R. Holmes Professor of Surgery and Chairman of the Department of Surgery at the University of Cincinnati, a position he held for over 25 years, until 1978.

In addition to his educational appointments, he was the Director of Surgical Services at Cincinnati General Hospital (1952 – 1978) and Christ Hospital (1976 – 1978); Surgeon-in-Chief at Children’s and Holmes Hospitals (1952 – 1978); Consulting Surgeon at Dunham, Drake, and the V.A. Hospitals; and Assistant Chief of Staff at Holmes Hospital.

Beyond teaching and hospital administration, he was also a prominent researcher on topics such as wounds, burns, Gas Gangrene, Shock, Trauma, and Staphylococcal Infections. He performed research for the University of Cincinnati as well as the United States Surgeon General, and served on the National Research Council in the Division of Medical Sciences and United States Public Health Service. He was also very active in the medical professions community, serving as president of the American Surgical Association, president and one of the founders of the Surgical Infection Society, vice chairman of the American Board of Surgery, editorial board for American Surgeon, Annals of Surgery, and Journal of Surgical Research, and surgical consultant to the Surgeon General of the United States Public Health Service and to the United States Army in Japan and Korea.

As I continue working on this collection, I’m looking forward to sharing with you some of the items in the collection that demonstrate some of these contributions and achievements, and expanding in more detail their significance.  Contact me at templea@mail.uc.edu with any questions and insights.

-Alex Temple (Winkler Center Temporary Archivist)

Read Source to learn more about the news, events, people and happenings in UC Libraries.

source graphicRead Source, the online newsletter, to learn more about the news, events, people and happenings in UC Libraries.

In this edition of Source, Dean Xuemao Wang writes about the university’s Bicentennial and we announce an exhibit of books from the libraries that document the university’s 200 years.  We interview Brad Warren, associate dean of library services, and focus on the Visualization Lab located in the Geology-Mathematics-Physics Library.

An article from Rich Puff, assistant vice president of public relations & communications, Academic Health Center, honors Lucy Oxley, MD, ‘a pioneer and a servant leader.’ University archivist and head of the Archives and Rare Books Library Kevin Grace writes about James Landy’s 1876 images celebrating William Shakespeare

Lastly, we promote to upcoming events: Hidden Treasures: An Adopt-A-Book Evening on March 14 and the Cecil Striker Society Annual Lecture on May 15.

Read these articles, as well as past issues, on the web at http://libapps.libraries.uc.edu/source/ and via e-mail. To receive Source via e-mail, contact melissa.norris@uc.edu to be added to the mailing list.

Read the University of Cincinnati Libraries 2017/18 Annual Progress Report

UC Libraries Progress ReportRead the University of Cincinnati Libraries 2017/18 Annual Progress Report where we ask the question: Have We Transformed Yet?

In this year’s annual Progress Report, we make note of the accomplishments of the previous year, as well as take a holistic view of UC Libraries since the Strategic Plan was launched five years ago. We celebrate the continued success of annual events that promote library collections and services, highlight milestones of major library initiatives and feature library spaces.

Integral to fulfilling the work of the Strategic Plan is the dedication of the faculty and staff of UC Libraries along with the investment of our donors. By highlighting the accomplishments of our hard-working staff and listing the current donors, both groups are recognized and celebrated in this Progress Report.

Finally, if all of the accomplishments listed in this report signal that we are at least on the road to transformation than we must ask ourselves the question…what’s next?

The Progress Report is available online at https://issuu.com/uclibraries/docs/uclannualprogressreport17_18.

Questions? Request a print copy? Email melissa.norris@uc.edu.

Happy Reading!

William A. Altemeier Collection Archivist, Alex Temple

Young Dr. William A. Altemeier

Hi, I’m Alex Temple, the archivist processing the William Altemeier Archival Collection thanks to a generous gift from the Altemeier family. I’m a Cincinnati native and UC graduate. After completing my BA in History here at UC, I went on to Kent State’s School of Information, where I earned a Masters in Library and Information Science with a specialization in Archives & Special Collections.

Preserving history and making it accessible has been a passion of mine, and I have been fortunate enough to work in a variety of settings and types of work. I started at the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County in 2006, where I performed reference assistance and have contributed to numerous projects involving rare and fragile material. I have been a volunteer at the Preservation Lab at Langsam Library for four years, where I help to mend damaged books and other material.  For a look at the exciting work that happens there, you can visit their blog at http://thepreservationlab.org/. I have also participated in a massive digitization project on the Turks & Caicos Islands, where we digitized government and church records, such as marriage and baptisms.  I am also processing a collection for another UC notable, Benjamin Gettler, at the Archives & Rare Books Library here on campus.

While I’m just starting to scratch the surface of the William Altemeier Collection, I find myself really excited to learn about his life and work.  He contributed a great deal to the medical field in his time with hundreds of published articles, and the research, drafts, and manuscripts in the collection will be fascinating to look at. I really look forward not only to learning about his life, but also arranging and describing his collection, working to digitize select materials, and creating an online exhibit. I’ll be sharing notable pieces with you along way, so check back for updates! I’d love to hear your questions or stories, please email me at templea@mail.uc.edu.

Dean’s Corner: Welcome Back UC!

I am currently visiting Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia for the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) World Library and Information Congress along with some of my colleagues from UC Libraries, but I’m excited to return to UC and greet our new and returning students and faculty.

At IFLA’s World Conference with Library Chief Technology Officer May Chang and Global Services Librarian Hong Cheng. Behind us is Kuala Lumpur’s famous Petronas Towers.

Before we dive into the fall semester, here’s a brief overview of the last few months at UC Libraries.

Several key library positions were filled over the summer, including: associate director of business affairs Jeremy Berberich; business and data analytics librarian Maggie Patel; associate dean of library services Brad Warren; and content analyst Dorcas Washington. The Digital Scholarship Center also continued to grow, welcoming digital scholarship library fellow Erin McCabe and data visualization developer Ezra Edgerton. They joined software developer Zhaowei Ren, with the support of a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

UC Libraries joined HathiTrust, a national and international partnership of research institutions and libraries.

The Winkler Center Advisory Board hosted the annual Cecil Striker Society Lecture, “Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Impacting the Health of Children in Our Community and the World: The Past, Present and Future,” with co-lecturers Michael K. Farrell, MD and Bea Katz, PhD.

Continue reading Dean’s Corner: Welcome Back UC!

Native Voices: Keynote Presentation and Exhibit Opening

Suzanne Singer gives the keynote address to kick off the Native Voices exhibit.

On Thursday, July 26, Dr. Suzanne Singer launched the Native Voices exhibit opening giving her keynote presentation after introductions by Xuemao Wang, Dean, University of Cincinnati Libraries; Philip Diller, MD/PhD, Chair and Fred Lazarus Jr Endowed Professor of Family and Community Medicine; and Bleuzette Marshall, PhD, Vice President for Equity and Inclusion at UC. Dr. Singer is an Energy Systems and Thermal Analyst in the Computational Engineering Division at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, CA.  Her talk focused on the intersections between land, energy, and health in the Navajo community.

After the presentation attendees were encouraged to visit the exhibit and enjoy some of the catered hors d’oeuvres. In addition to the Native Voices exhibit, which is made up primarily of oral histories, a supplementary poster presentation also will run concurrently with the exhibit and be on display alongside the Native Voices listening stations. The posters are a capstone project from a UC Medical Botany class taught by Theresa M. Culley, Ph.D. and Eric Tepe, Ph.D during spring semester, 2018. The posters examine how Native Americans used indigenous plants to maintain health and hygiene.

Panels in the Native Voices: Native Peoples’ Concepts of Health and Illness exhibit.

Do try to attend one of the Native Voices lectures over the next several weeks. On Wednesday, August 8th, Madeleine Fix will present “Cincinnati’s Public Landing, the Measles, and Wyandot Removal.”  If you are unable to attend, stay turned for more recaps.

A schedule of the remaining lectures is available online. And thank you so much for your continued support of this exhibit and its additional programming.

In the carousel below, please enjoy some of the images taken at the keynote and exhibit opening.

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Native Voices Children’s Programming Event a Success

Last week several UC Libraries (HSL, CECH, Langsam) collaborated to produce the first installment in our Native Voices: Native Peoples’ Concepts of Health and Illness public programming. This inaugural event focused specifically on children as Langsam Library received a visit from twenty-four students of the Arlitt Child & Family Research & Education Center. Cheryl Ghosh, Senior Librarian at UC’s CECH Library put together an amazing program of dramatic skits, activity stations, and multi-media fun.

First, the 3 to 5-year-olds were treated to an introduction and brief play about the Iroquois legend of the Three Sisters and its corresponding gardening tradition. This tradition of planting corn, beans and squash (the sisters) in close proximity is widespread among Native American farming. At the same time the story functions as a metaphor for supporting and helping one another.

After the skit, the children were divided into groups and each group moved on to an activity station. One group and its chaperones built a teepee. The other, shucked corn and picked beans from bean plants. After ten minutes the groups switched and tried the other activity.

After fifteen minutes of activities, the students had a brief snack then proceeded to the Student Technology Resource Center (STAC) where video was taken of them in front of a green screen. At that point the video was superimposed onto an image of the Great Plains and an American Indian village complete with moving buffalo.

Finally, as a parting gift, each child received the book D is for Drum: A Native American Alphabet by Debbie and Michael Shoulders and Irving Toddy. The event lasted approximately an hour and at no time did our worries of waning attention spans among the children materialize. They never once lost interest. A success, if we  do say so!  And a huge thanks to all who assisted.

Please plan to attend the Native Voices: Native American Concepts of Health and Illness opening event on Thursday, July 26th in the CARE/Crawley Atrium of the UC  Medical Sciences Building.  And stay tuned for the six weeks of supplementary programming the HSL has planned.

Please see the gallery below for more images of the event.

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The Donald C. Harrison Health Sciences Library Selected to Host Traveling Exhibition about Native Concepts of Health and Illness

Mashpee Wampanoag Indian Powwow, Mashpee, Massachusetts, July 2010. Courtesy National Library of Medicine/Bryant Pegram
Mashpee Wampanoag Indian Powwow, Mashpee, Massachusetts, July 2010. Courtesy National Library of Medicine/Bryant Pegram

The Donald C. Harrison Health Sciences Library has been selected in a competitive application process to host Native Voices: Native Peoples’ Concepts of Health and Illness, a traveling exhibition to U.S. libraries.

Native Voices explores the interconnectedness of wellness, illness and cultural life for Native Americans, Alaska Natives and Native Hawaiians. Stories drawn from both the past and present examine how health for Native People is tied to community, the land and spirit. Through interviews, Native People describe the impact of epidemics, federal legislation, the loss of land and the inhibition of culture on the health of Native individuals and communities today.

As one of 104 grant recipients selected from across the country, the Donald C. Harrison Health Sciences Library will host the traveling exhibition July 23 through Aug. 30, 2018.

The U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM) developed and produced Native Voices: Native Peoples’ Concepts of Health and Illness. The American Library Association (ALA) Public Programs Office, in partnership with NLM, tours the exhibition to America’s libraries. Native Voices: Native Peoples’ Concepts of Health and Illness was displayed at the NLM in Bethesda, Maryland, from 2011 to 2015. To learn more and view content from the exhibition, visit http://www.nlm.nih.gov/nativevoices.

Suzanne L. Singer
Suzanne L. Singer

Related Events

In association with the Native Voices exhibit, related events have been scheduled to explore the topic of Native Peoples’ Concepts of Health and Illness. The first scheduled event is keynote speaker Suzanne L. Singer scheduled for 5-7:30 p.m., Thursday, July 26, in the CARE/Crawley Atrium (Medical Sciences Building, 231 Albert Sabin Way). Throughout August, lectures that cover such topics as “The Contribution of Native Voices to Medicine through Botany,” “Breaking Bread: A Perspective of Fry Bread and Native Health” and “Preventing Tuberculosis while Regulating Indigenous Bodies” have been scheduled in the Stanley J. Lucas, MD, Board Room, E level of the Medical Sciences Building near the Kresge Circle.

A full schedule of events is listed online.

Continue reading The Donald C. Harrison Health Sciences Library Selected to Host Traveling Exhibition about Native Concepts of Health and Illness