XSEDE HPC Workshop: GPU Programming Using OpenACC

XSEDE HPC Workshop: GPU Programming Using OpenACC

Free Registration (required)

Description:    The University of Cincinnati is pleased to be a remote site for the XSEDE HPC Workshop GPU Programming using OpenACC, taught by the Pittsburg Supercomputing Center. OpenACC is the accepted standard using compiler directives to allow quick development of GPU capable codes using standard languages and compilers. It has been used with great success to accelerate real applications within very short development periods. This workshop assumes knowledge of either C or Fortran programming.  Due to demand, this workshop is telecast to several satellite sites. Tentative Agenda

When:           November 6, 2018: 11am – 5pm

Location:    University Hall Room 454
51 Goodman Street
Cincinnati, OH 45221

Note:               You need an XSEDE account to register Create Account

Parking:          Kingsgate Garage, 151 Goodman Street

Special Instructions: Participants should bring their own laptop, lunch will be provided.

Questions?     Contact Amy Latessa latessak@uc.edu

XSEDE (eXtreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment) is a virtual system that provides compute resources for scientists and researchers from all over the country. Its mission is to facilitate research collaboration among institutions, enhance research productivity, provide remote data transfer, and enable remote instrumentation. XSEDE is funded by National Science Foundation (NSF).  Getting Started Guide for XSEDE.

Flyer – DCS2-OpenACC Nov 6, 2018

 

Join UC Libraries at Books by the Banks Oct. 20

On Saturday, Oct. 20, the 12th annual Books by the Banks: Cincinnati USA Book Festival will take place downtown at Duke Energy Convention Center from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Once again, UC Libraries is an organizing partner of the literary event that allows readers to meet and greet favorite authors.

The day-long festival will feature over 150 regional and national authors, book signings, author panels and activities for the entire family to enjoy. All events are free and open to the public.

At the festival, attendees will have the opportunity to meet authors and to purchase signed copies of their books. Books by the Banks features writers in various categories, including fiction, non-fiction, cooking, children’s literature, local travel, sports and more. Nationally known authors such as Nick Bruel, Wil Haygood, Alice McDermott, Sara Paretsky and Jason Reynolds will join local favorites Sharon Draper, Will Hillenbrand and Thane Maynard to celebrate the joy and reading of books. Continue reading Join UC Libraries at Books by the Banks Oct. 20

Some Blowpipe Equipment : Notes from the Oesper Collections, No. 52, September/October 2018

A portable Berzelius oil lamp for blowpipe analysis. The additional ring and alcohol lamp could be used to evaporate mineral water samples for analysis.
A portable Berzelius oil lamp for blowpipe analysis. The additional ring and alcohol lamp could be used to evaporate mineral water samples for analysis.

Issue 52 highlights items in the Oesper Collections related to the practice and teaching of blowpipe analysis.

Click here for all other issues from the Oesper Collections and to explore the Jensen-Thomas Apparatus Collection.

 

 

 

 

 

 

How UC Researchers use the Open Science Framework – Karlynn BrintzenhofeSzoc, CAHS-School of Social Work, Associate Professor

In our third installment of the series “How UC Researchers use the Open Science Framework”, we hear from

Karlynn BrintzenhofeSzoc, CAHS-School of Social Work, Associate Professor

Karlynn Brintzenhofeszoc, CAHS-School of Social Work, Associate Professor

 

Research Project Description or statement about your research interest:

I am working with a group of trans-disciplinary researchers who focus on the current state of care for older adults with cancer.  It is well known that enrollment of older adults into cancer clinical trials is not proportional to the number of older adults who are diagnosed with and treated for cancer.  Further there is little known about how older patients who participated in clinical trials respond to treatments.  And we do not have a clear understanding of the many factors that affect their quality of life during treatment such as drug tolerance levels or best practices in coordinating their care.

Additionally, The American Society for Clinical Oncology (https://www.asco.org/) published a call to increase the recruitment of older adults into trials.  One of the main recommendations they made is that journals develop policies that would involve a better reporting system that would encourage data to be analyzed and reported by age groups on efficacy and adverse effects.  This change could improve clinical practice and likely improve the quality of life of older adults.

Our research project will take a snapshot of the literature and focus on Phase III therapeutic cancer clinical trials.  We are conducting a systematic review of the literature for the time frame of July 1 2016 to June 30 2017.  One of the data points we are gathering is inclusion and exclusion criteria which have an upper age cutoff.  Already we see in the literature that there is an inconsistency in age reporting.  Also, it is difficult to find reports where the results are stratified for older adults.  And in order to set best practices, we believe researchers need to pay more attention to older adults when reporting outcomes.

This group of researchers and clinicians are a part of the Cancer and Aging Research Group (mycarg.org) which is a national advocacy group that funds and supports research to provide better coordinated care for older adults with cancer.

Why did you chose to use the OSF to organize your research/projects?

We started off using another workflow to assign readings to reviewers and it was a disaster in record keeping.   We couldn’t figure out what articles had been assigned to reviewers, and if and when they had completed their assigned readings.

Then I discovered the Open Science Framework (through an email from the library) and switched to using the OSF.  It was very easy to transition our workflow to this system.  We could set up projects in the OSF, connect with the reviewers by inviting them to be collaborators, and share their tasks through the OSF.  We created files (or components in the OSF) for each person.  We loaded their reading assignments into the project and were able to track when they opened the files.  So we knew what was getting done and what still needed to be addressed.  It was very easy to use, especially for collaborators with virtually no training needed.  There was no angst or pain with the system.  It is also very easy to add and remove collaborators.

What about the OSF makes this tool a good choice for your project management (i.e. specific function of the OSF)?

I LOVE the notification features.  We can track that the work is being done by the reviewers assigned.  And it is easy to extract the data from a collection document in the OSF into our REDCap data management system.

Additional comment for the post that you are willing to share:

A second group of clinicians and researchers who are members of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC; mascc.org) are starting another project using the OSF.  A CARG clinicians, who is leading this second project that is looking at shared decision making with older adults with cancer, has also decided to use OSF for the project.

The OSF has a lot of potential.  I personally could use it more, but would want additional training to understand all the functionality of the OSF.  And I love that the platform is accessible anywhere.

Currently our project is only accessible to collaborators, but it will be easy to open components of the project if we choose or need to share some of our findings.

 

Erin Rinto Joins UC Libraries as Teaching and Research Librarian

Today, Erin Rinto began work at UC Libraries as the new teaching and research librarian in the Research and Teaching Services Department located in the Walter C. Langsam Library. Erin comes to UC from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas where she was the teaching and learning librarian.  Over the past six years at UNLV, she worked to integrate information literacy outcomes into the general education program via sustainable, evidence-based approaches, thus providing her with extensive teaching and research experience. Erin’s primary responsibility will be working with the English Composition program, including serving on the cross-jurisdictional English Composition Committee.

Welcome to UC Libraries, Erin.

 

Bernstein, Shakespeare, Preservation Photographs and Dedicated Staff are All Featured in the Latest Issue of Source

source headerRead Source, the online newsletter, to learn more about the news, events, people and happenings in UC Libraries.

In this edition of Source we celebrate Leonard Bernstein at 100 with news of an exhibit on display in the Walter C. Langsam Library. Dean Xuemao Wang writes about how the occasion of the university’s upcoming Bicentennial has led him to reflect on the contributions of four staff members retiring this fall. We announce two grants received by the National Network of Libraries of Medicine that will promote good data and good health.

University archivist and head of the Archives and Rare Books Library Kevin Grace teaches readers and students in his honors class about Extra-Illustrated Editions. Jessica Ebert, lead photographic technician in the Preservation Lab writes about her work creating visual representations of the conservation treatments performed, and housing created, in the Lab. Mike Braunlin of the John Miller Burnam Classics Library offers his experience and insights gained working in the library for 42 years. The UC Foundation writes about a unique collection gifted to the Libraries from two former professors. Lastly, the annual Books by the Banks: Cincinnati USA Books Festival, of which UC Libraries is an organizing partner, is announced in this issue.

Read these articles, as well as past issues, on the web at http://libapps.libraries.uc.edu/source/ and via e-mail. To receive Source via e-mail, contact melissa.norris@uc.edu to be added to the mailing list.

Join Us in Celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month!

Hispanic Heritage Month is observed from September 15th to October 15th to honor the contributions and influences of Hispanic and Latinx cultures on America. Please browse our materials on display on the 4th floor of the Walter C. Langsam Library all month and join us for presentations on Spanish and Hispano-Arabic culture.

On Thursday, September 27th, from 11:30am -12:30pm, professor Frederic Cadora and professor Grace Thome will present, “The Arabic Spice Road,” discussing how not only spices made their way to Europe from the Arab World, but also other goods—linguistic and cultural—that linked the two regions for centuries. The presentation serves as a sample of the course, “Hispano-Arabic Culture, Literature, Music, and Architecture/Art,” which will be offered in spring semester of 2019. Thyme pies and rolled grape leaves will be served to exemplify the delicious impact of Hispano-Arabic culture.

On Thursday, September 27th, from 2:00pm – 3:00pm, professor Maria-Paz Moreno will present, “Tasking Power: The Bittersweet History of Chocolate” about the fascinating history of chocolate and the origins of this food and the myths around it. This presentation serves as a sample of the course “Food and Culture of Spain,” which will also be offered in spring semester of 2019. You will get the chance to sample several kinds of chocolate and cacao beans from different parts of the world to experience the variety chocolate has to offer.

Sponsored by the University of Cincinnati Libraries, the presentations will be held in the Digital Commons space located in the back of the 4th floor of the Langsam Library. They are free and open to the entire UC community. We hope to see you there!

Exhibit Celebrates Leonard Bernstein at 100

Bernstein Centennial Celebration
Performer. Composer. Teacher.
These three descriptions of world-renowned musician Leonard Bernstein, who was born 100 years ago this year, are celebrated in a new exhibit on display on the 4th floor lobby of the Walter C. Langsam Library now through the end of the calendar year. The exhibit includes biographical and professional information about Bernstein, recordings, books and images. It corresponds with a display in the Albino Gorno Memorial (CCM) Library of additional Bernstein materials and recordings.

ccm displayThe exhibit was designed by UC Libraries communication co-op student Sophia Yu with assistance from co-op student Sam Kane. It was curated by Jenny Doctor, head of the CCM Library, and Paul Cauthen, assistant music librarian, and produced by Melissa Cox Norris, director of library communications.

For more about Leonard Bernstein, read the full exhibit text below by Jenny Doctor. Interested in attending a Leonard Bernstein Concert, visit https://ccm.uc.edu/boxoffice/bernstein-festival.html, to learn about how CCM is celebrating Leonard Bernstein at 100! Continue reading Exhibit Celebrates Leonard Bernstein at 100

How UC Researchers use the Open Science Framework – UC Center for Police Research and Policy

In our second installment of the series “How UC Researchers use the Open Science Framework”, we hear from Hannah McManus, Gabrielle Isaza, and Clair Green-Schwartz, Research Associates with the IACP / UC Center for Police Research and Policy 

Hannah McManus, Gabrielle Isaza, and Clair Green-Schwartz, Research Associates with the IACP / UC Center for Police Research and Policy

Research Project Description or statement about your research interest

The International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP)/University of Cincinnati (UC) Center for Police Research and Policy engages in rigorous research that has practical implications for the field and is intended to serve as a national model for the way law enforcement agencies and researchers work together to help protect communities, safeguard citizens’ rights, and ensure the fair treatment of all individuals.

There is currently a gap between research and practice, and the IACP/UC Center for Police Research and Policy seeks to play an important role in closing that gap. Often times existing research does not provide actionable recommendations that can be easily translated into specific, practical policies and practices that could enhance policing. Moreover, academic researchers often do not have access to all the data that police departments have that is necessary to conduct rigorous and meaningful research on police practices. The goal of the IACP/UC Center for Police Research and Policy is to provide a path for law enforcement and researchers to work together on studies that can drive future practices and policies.

Why did you chose to use the OSF to organize your research/projects?

The IACP/UC Center for Police Research and Policy is funded by the Laura and John Arnold Foundation (LJAF). The LJAF is committed to funding research that meets the most rigorous standards of quality and transparency. As such, we make public our preregistration document for each project, which involves describing the research design in detail before the statistical analyses are performed. Further, we update the Center’s OSF profile as we gather more information on individual projects, and submit all applicable research materials onto the OSF for public viewing. At the end of our research projects, we include the findings either in the form of a written report or a link to a publication or preprint elsewhere. These findings must be freely available in some form, which removes the financial barriers that some may face when trying to access research. The Center’s OSF webpage thus provides a comprehensive overview of an entire research project from start to finish. And further, in the event that a research project does not lead to a peer-reviewed publication, posting the results at OSF serves a valuable informative purpose.

What about the OSF makes this tool a good choice for your project management (i.e. specific function of the OSF)?

The OSF is a useful web platform to centralize all parts of the project from initial idea to final results. It keeps a useful history of documents for us to track changes and progress over time. Ultimately, this tool is most useful in its ability to serve as a platform for transparency in research.

Please use this link for further detail about the Center for Police Research and Policy’s research projects:

https://osf.io/f2drv/