Berg Fashion Library

Fashion Design Students!

Please check out the Berg Fashion Library

Its amazing features include:

  • Reference works including the 10-volume Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion, A–Z of Fashion, and The Dictionary of Fashion History
  • More than 100 academic eBooks
  • An invaluable museum directory
  • Over 13,000 color images from prestigious partners such as the Costume Institute at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Victoria and Albert Museum, the Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology, Mode Museum, and the Commercial Pattern Archive
  • Unique exhibition archive, which showcases images from historic exhibitions from museums around the world, including the Museum at Fashion Institute of Technology and Somerset House

 

The Bizarre Valentine Postcards of R.F. Outcault

By:  Kevin Grace

Postcard showing little boy crying and dogs looking onThe children are either drawn as freckle-faced street urchins or as the clean-smocked offspring of the hoity-toity.  The animals – a parrot, typically dogs – look on quizzically or crack wise.  And the occasion being Valentine’s Day, the messages are about the lovelorn and the hopeful.  These are the early 20th century postcards drawn by Richard Felton Outcault, a pioneer of the modern newspaper comic strip who gave America such literary figures as Buster Brown and The Yellow Kid.   And advertising being Richard Felton Outcaultwhat it was (and is), Buster and the Kid gave us books, shoes, coin banks, calendars, clocks, pencils, puzzles, and all manner of geegaws, selling the country on the all-American pastime of buying stuff.

But the postcards deviated from the overall merchandising a bit, although Outcault’s newspaper employers and their agents certainly generated a lot of them.  The holiday cards were something a little different, a reflection of the artist’s own attitudes to his comic Postcard showing girl kissing boy with the words, "O! Will I be your Valentine?creations.  R.F. Outcault was born in 1863, hailing from Lancaster, Ohio.  He came to Cincinnati in 1878 to attend the McMicken School of Design – which is now the Cincinnati Art Academy, though the University of Cincinnati certainly traces part of its heritage as well to the McMicken school, so in effect Outcault is a UC alumnus.  He graduated in 1881 and began his employment as a painter of bucolic scenes in the massive safes constructed by the Hall Safe and Lock Company.  Growing in local reputation, Outcault managed to land a job with the 1888 centennial industrial exposition in Cincinnati, one of the many local product fairs held in the 19th century, and which were begun as an outlet of the Ohio Mechanics Institute, founded in Child asking for a Valentine with parrot looking on1828 and now part of the University of Cincinnati’s College of Engineering and Applied Science.  At the exposition he painted scenes for Thomas Edison’s electric light displays, parlaying that into a career on the east coast with trade magazines.  Incidentally, while Edison was a telegraph operator in 1860s Cincinnati, he frequented the OMI library for his reading pleasure.

By 1894, Outcault was drawing cartoons for newspapers and magazines, particularly the New Postcard with the words "This is February 14" showing a girl and a dogYork World, the New York Journal, Judge, and the New York Herald.  It was during this time that he created his first famous character of his “Hogan’s Alley” cartoon, the Yellow Kid.  By 1902, R.F. introduced his famous Buster Brown and his faithful terrier, Tige.  And, his personal style of using panels and dialogue balloons became a standard in cartooning.

A boy in uniform giving a girl a Valentine's cardBut those strange Valentine cards?  They are unlike the sweet and lovey-dovey kids’ valentines of the late 20th century.  Instead, there is an edge to Outcault’s art, a bit of an insult here and there, and more rejection than true love.  In a way, they are an outgrowth of the so-called “Vinegar Valentines” of Victorian America.  Vinegar valentines Postcard with a girl and boy and the words "I adore you"were sarcastic and insulting, greetings designed to reject the offers of true love.  Competing with true romantic valentines, these little missives of misanthropy usually were sent anonymously to those one disliked, be they flirtatious bachelors or suffragists.   Outcault’s cards resemble them in a natural progression, one supposes, from invective to just strange little takes on the whole idea of Valentine’s Day.

Postcard with the words, "I'm thinking, thinking all the time. Of my heart's best love, my valentine." Showing young man and dogFor R.F. Outcault, his valentine postcards were done in his typical style and represent another aspect of what was a long and productive cartooning career.  Retiring from the hubbub of daily newspaper work, he spent the last decade of his life quietly painting and died in 1928.

 

A Jacobite Jukebox: Historical Narratives Preserved in Song

By: McKenna Corey, ARB Intern

It was hard for me to really conceptualize the true narrative power of song until I was reorganizing the Virginius C. Hall Jacobite Collection this week. As I was arranging a stack of books, I saw one that caught my eye. The spine read: The Scottish Jacobites and Their Songs and Music. Written in 1899 by Thomas Newbigging, the book recounts in detail not only the history of the Jacobite movements, but also their rich musical history.

Cover of Scottish Jacobites by Thomas NewbiggingThough I’ve never really had any musical talent (except some early experiences with the recorder), I thought it might be interesting to pursue some further research on the topic. Sure enough, there were further resources on the musical stylings of the Jacobites, and I decided to dig in! Though in this post I’ll only be referencing Newbigging’s book,  I’ll include a reading list of some other books I found here at the ARB that focus on the Jacobites’ music and song.

As I read further into Newbigging’s analysis of the songs, I realized how truly important music was to the Jacobites as they pursued their quest to return King James II and VII to the throne, and restore the power of the monarchy to the House of Stuart. The Jacobites were steadfast in their goals; they believed that James’ removal from power was an illegal move, and that he was their rightful ruler. Though the Jacobites were ultimately unsuccessful in their attempts to restore the House of Stuart, their music lives on and preserves their history.

This music served a variety of purposes. Some songs were poetic battle cries that motivated the Jacobites to pursue their goals, some were sad ruminations upon those that were lost, and some took a darkly humorous outlook on a seemingly hopeless situation. Regardless of their intended purposes, these Jacobite songs are poignant reflections on this period in history, including not only the Jacobites’ story, but their spirit. These songs are performed even today. I wanted to pick out a few of my favorites from Newbigging’s book, and include some audio so you can listen to them too! I didn’t think I’d be spending my week listening to bagpipes, but I can’t say I’m upset about it; rather, I’ve been pleasantly surprised at how much I enjoyed it. Continue reading A Jacobite Jukebox: Historical Narratives Preserved in Song

New Acquisitions-DAAP Library Special Collections

A new shipment of concrete poetry books has arrived in the Robert A. Deshon and Karl J. Schlachter Library for Design, Architecture, Art and Planning (DAAP). Titles by John M. Bennett, Jim Leftwich, Robin Crozier, César Figueiredo, Serge Segay and others.

Make an appointment with Interim DAAP Library Head Elizabeth Meyer or librarian Andrea Chemero to view them.

Photo of concrete poetry book cover Wave by John M. Bennett
Wave, by John M. Bennett
"Ripening of Meat," a poem from Co-Labor-ative Writing
“Ripening of Meat,” a poem from Co-Labor-ative Writing
Co-Labor-ative Writing by Editor Luigi-Bob Drake, cover photo
Various titles from new acquisitions.
New acquisitions.

 

Workshop on Text mining HathiTrust Resources with python

 

 

 

 

 

Eleanor Dickson Koehl, digital scholarship librarian with the HathiTrust will visit UC Libraries to give a presentation on the HathiTrust Research Center and conduct a workshop on text mining using HathiTrust Resources and python.  The talk will be Tuesday Feb 26th from 3- 4 pm and the workshop will be Wednesday Morning from 9am -12pm with a luncheon afterwards from 12 pm-1 pm.  Please join for one or both events which will be held in the Vis Lab 240H Braunstein Hall – inside the Geology-Math and Physics Library.  These events are free and open to all.  We request that attendees of the text mining workshop complete registration through the faculty one stop system.

For more information please refer to the DCS2 Word flyer_hathi_2019.

Elliston Poetry Room Announces Its Spring Poetry Schedule

Elliston Poetry Room SignDo you like poetry? Interested in hearing poets talk about and read their work?

The Ellison Poetry Room, located in 646 Walter C. Langsam Library, announced its spring poetry schedule. All readings are free and open to the public. Book signings follow each reading.

NTOZAKE SHANGE: CELEBRATING AN ARTISTIC LEGACY THROUGH CONVERSATION AND PERFORMANCE

Featuring Dr. Shirlene Holmes, Aku Kadogo, RAHBI, the Cincinnati Black Theatre Company, College-Conservatory of Music (Acting), and The School for Creative and Performing Arts
February 15, 2019; 4:00 PM
Elliston Poetry Room, 646 Langsam Library
Sponsored by the Weinberger Center for Drama and Playwriting

ISHION HUTCHINSON

Poetry Reading
February 22, 2019; 4:00 PM
Elliston Poetry Room, 646 Langsam Library

MARY RUEFLE

2018-19 Elliston Poet-in-Residence
Lecture
March 6, 2019; 4:00 PM
Elliston Poetry Room, 646 Langsam Library

Poetry Reading
March 8, 2019; 4:00 PM
Elliston Poetry Room, 646 Langsam Library

XHENET ALIU & TIMOTHY O’KEEFE

Fiction and Poetry Reading
April 11, 2019; Time TBD
Elliston Poetry Room, 646 Langsam Library

THE ROBERT AND ADELE SCHIFF FICTION FESTIVAL

Featuring Sloane Crosley, Uzodinma Iweala, Katie Kitamura, and Brendan Mathews
April 17, 2019; 7:00 PM: Fiction Reading
April 18, 2019; 11:00 AM: Panel Discussion
April 18, 2019; 7:00 PM: Fiction Reading
April 19, 2019; 10:00 AM: Panel Discussion
All events take place in the Elliston Poetry Room, 646 Langsam Library

Named for the Cincinnati poet George Elliston, the Elliston Poetry Room houses a 20th-century poetry collection of over 10,000 books, magazines, records and recordings. Students and faculty interested in modern poetry can also take advantage of reading space and listening facilities, as well as poetry-writing workshops and poetry readings.

More information on each of these events may be found at: https://www.artsci.uc.edu/departments/english/creative-writing/visiting-writers-series.html

Prayer and Meditation Space Created in Langsam Library

prayer space flyerThe University of Cincinnati Libraries has partnered with UC Student Government to create a Prayer and Meditation Space in the Walter C. Langsam Library.

Located in room 451, the Prayer and Meditation Space is available for use 24/7 on a first-come basis, no reservations required. Use of the space is for quiet meditation, prayer or silent reflection. Please do not use this room as a lounge, study room or meeting room.

UC Libraries Closed Wednesday, Jan. 30, including Langsam Library’s 4th floor.

Due to inclement weather, the University of Cincinnati Libraries will close from 7 a.m. until midnight on Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2019, except for the Donald C. Harrison Health Sciences Library, which will be open 9am – 5pm. This closure includes the 4th floor of the Walter C. Langsam Library, which will close at 7 a.m. on Wednesday, Jan. 30 and reopen at 7:45am on Thursday, Jan. 31.

Stay warm.