Workshop on Research Reproducibility and Data Visualization using R.

Join UCLibraries and IT@UC for a workshop on Research Reproducibility and Data Visualization using R (part of the Data and Computational Science Series (funded by the Provost Office through a universal provider grant).

 

On April 16th, Dr. Mine Cetinkaya-Rundel, Associate Professor at Duke University and Data Scientist & Professional Educator at RStudio will be on campus to give a presentation about Reproducible Research and conduct a workshop on Data Visualization in R.

The day’s schedule is below.  The venue will be the Data Visualization Space in the Geology-Math-Physics Library – 240H Braunstein Hall.

10:00 am to 11:00 am  Presentation – Reproducible Research

11:00 am to 12:00 pm  Meet and Greet with Dr. Cetinkaya-Rundel  (Lunch provided)

12:00 pm to 2:00 pm  Workshop – Data Visualization in R with ggplot2 and gganimate

 

These events are free and open to all.

Visit the Faculty One Stop website to register.

More information about the DCSS 2019 series can be found on the DCSS website .

Flyer: DCS2 Word flyer_Rstudio

Help Config the Refig! Langsam 4th Floor East Remodel

4th floor reno graphicWhy do you come to the library? What kind of furniture do you want? What inspires you? These are some of the questions UC Libraries is asking users to consider as they provide input on possible changes to a large area within the library.

This summer, the Walter C. Langsam Library’s 4th floor east will be remodeled. UC Libraries is seeking input on what is desired for the space. The project encompasses approximately 13,000 square feet. One of the main objectives of the project is to add more user space (referred to as seats). Some library collections will remain, while others will be relocated. The project will begin in summer 2019 with completion during the fall semester.

To provide input, library visitors are encouraged to draw, write or tell their ideas on one of two large blackboards positioned at the entrance to the library as well as in the 4th floor east space. In addition, there is a handout(PDF) that can be filled out and either returned to the Desk@Langsam or emailed to libfacilityfeedback@uc.edu.

Get creative!

And the Winners are…Results of the 2019 UC Libraries International Edible Books Festival

cupcakes
Best Overall – A Series of Unfortunate Cupcakes by the Warren Family

The University of Cincinnati Libraries celebrated the International Edible Books Festival on April 1, 2019.

Twenty edible books were created by students, faculty, staff, librarians, friends and family. The entries ranged from children’s books to literary classics to popular fiction and self-help books. The edible books were made of cakes, cookies, candy, deviled eggs and even carrots. Each entry was judged by our esteemed judges Debbie Tenofsky and Mary Anne McMillan and awarded a bookmark.

Created by librarian Judith A. Hoffberg and artist Béatrice Coron, the International Edible Books Festival is held worldwide annually on or around April 1st to mark the birthday of Jean Brillat-Savarin, author of The Physiology of Taste.  The global event has been celebrated since 2000 in various parts of the world, including in Australia, Brazil, India, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, Mexico, Morocco, The Netherlands, Russia and Hong Kong.

UC Libraries has participated in the International Edible Books Festival since 2001. The 2019 winners ares:

  • Most Humorous – After the Party by Olya Hart
  • Most Whimsical – The Monster at the End of This Book by Melissa Cox Norris
  • Most Literary – The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Ben Kline and Aaron Libby
  • Most Creative – The Giving Tree by Jessica Ebert
  • Most Magical – Good Night Moon by Michelle Matevia
  • Most Adorable – Owl Moon by Debbie Weinstein
  • Most Clever – The Amazing Spider-Man by Sam Norris
  • Most Delicious – All New Square Foot Gardening by Luahna Winningham Carter
  • Most Deadly – Where the Red Fern Grows by Jack Norris
  • Most Checked Out – Green Eggs and Ham by Sami Scheidler
  • Most Fun – Middlemarch by Steve Norris
  • Most Taboo – Human Resources or was it Human Remains by Aja Hickman
  • Scariest – Ring by Holly Prochaska
  • Most Imaginative – The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Jenny Mackiewicz
  • Silliest – Too Many Carrots by Melissa Cox Norris
  • Most Outrageous – A Dance with Dragons by Sam Kane
  • Best Overall – A Series of Unfortunate Cupcakes by the Warren Family
  • Best Student Entry – The Little Prince by Emma Duhamel and Eli Seidman-Deutsch

Congratulations to all the edible books creators! View the entries and the winners on the UC Libraries Facebook page. See you next year for Edible Books 2020!

Hungry? Bite into an Edible Book with UC Libraries on April 1

2018’s Most Deadly – “Life Cycles” from Nature Anatomy: The Curious Parts and Pieces of the Natural World by Tania Paine

Celebrate books good enough to eat at the International Edible Books Festival set for 1 p.m., Monday, April 1.

The University of Cincinnati Libraries will celebrate the International Edible Books Festival with an event scheduled from 1-2 p.m. on Monday, April 1, in the fifth floor lobby of the Walter C. Langsam Library.

At the event, over 20 participants will present their edible creations that represent a book in some form. There are few restrictions in creating an edible book – namely that the creation be edible and have something to do with a book. Submitted entries include edible titles such as Food: A Love Story and A Series of Unfortunate Cupcakes. Best sellers The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up and The Giving Tree are represented alongside classics like Middlemarch, Where the Red Fern Grows and Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, among other literary greats.

t-shirtAs in past years, entries will be judged according to such categories as “Most Literary,” “Most Delicious,” “Most Hilarious” and “Most Gruesome.” In addition, the winners of “Top Student Entry” and “Best Overall Entry” will receive a limited edition UC Libraries t-shirt. After the entries are judged they will be consumed and enjoyed by all in attendance.

According to the International Edible Book Festival website, the edible book was initiated by librarian and artist Judith A. Hoffberg during a 1999 Thanksgiving celebration with book artists. It became an international celebration in 2000 when artist Béatrice Coron launched the Books2Eat website. Traditionally, the event is celebrated on April 1st (April Fools’ Day) to mark the birthday of Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin (1755-1826), a French lawyer and politician who became famous for his book, Physiologie du gout (The Physiology of Taste). To view images of the 2018 edible books, visit the Libraries Facebook page.

The Libraries International Edible Books Festival is free and open to the public. It is sponsored in part by Books by the Banks: Cincinnati Regional Book Festival.

Come to celebrate (and eat) “books good enough to eat!”

“An Evening with Aristophanes” in the Classics Library March 28

evening with AristophanesJoin the John Miller Burnam Classics Library, Thursday, March 28 from 5:00 to 7:00 p.m., in celebrating the life and work of the Greek comedy playwright Aristophanes.

The evening will include remarks by Rebecka Lindau, head of the Classics Library; a brief presentation of Aristophanes’ life and work by Susan Prince, associate professor of classics; and a reading of the play Lysistrata in Jeffrey Henderson’s Loeb translation, under the direction of Brant Russell, assistant professor of acting. The play will feature students from both UC’s Classics Department and from the College-Conservatory of Music (CCM). True to ancient Greek drama, music will further accompany the entrances and exits of the chorus and interludes, under the direction of Yo Shionoya, a graduate student in CCM.

The evening will conclude with a reception including Greek food.

The event will be presided over by the Greek god Dionysus who will greet all revelers at the door. The Classics Library will also feature a book exhibition with works of Aristophanes, including rare editions.

Please RSVP to Cade Stevens at stevencd@ucmail.uc.edu or (513) 556-1314 by Monday, March 25.

UPDATED: Interlibrary Loan Service Unavailable Monday, March 18, 8am-5pm because of Maintenance

UPDATE TWO:   Correct link to Illiad: https://illiad.uc.edu/illiad/index.html

If you have problems logging into Illiad, please use the above link to login.

We are working to correct all links now.

***************************************************

Thank you!

UPDATE: the scheduled maintenance is taking longer than anticipated. Please note we’ve changed the estimated up time to 5pm. Thank you for understanding.

***************************************************

The Libraries Interlibrary Loan (Illiad) server will be offline for maintenance Monday, March 18 from 8:00 AM to 12:00 PM. During that time, Interlibrary Loan will be unavailable.

Thank you for your patience.

Flora McDonald: A Heroine of the Jacobites

By McKenna Corey, ARB InternHandwritten text that says Flora McDonald

A Heroine of the Jacobites

“Had it not been that her prudence and energies were called forth by the important and critical part which she was instrumental in achieving, she might have lived and died unknown to the world.”

-Alexander Macgregor, The Life of Flora Macdonald

Portrait of Flora MacDonaldIn every piece of history, there is a powerful woman, sometimes hidden or obscured from the record, that made all of the difference. This is true of the Jacobite movement as well, and though there are many incredible women that contributed to the movement, today’s post will focus on an incredibly special one. Flora Macdonald, with her bravery and commitment, saved a man’s life. What is even more incredible is that she not only saved a man’s life, but one that is integral to Scottish history.

I realized when I stumbled upon this portrait in the Virginius C. Hall Jacobite Collection, what struck me first was the poise and grace with which Flora poses. I was so enamored with the portrait that I decided to look into its subject, and after some research within the collection, I realized how important to the history of the Jacobite movements she really was. Continue reading Flora McDonald: A Heroine of the Jacobites

Three Recent Articles Highlight Work being done in the Digital Scholarship Center

Three recent articles from faculty and staff working in or with the university’s Digital Scholarship Center demonstrate the transdisciplinary, enterprise-wide research mission of the center. In these three articles, topics include information science, new media and communications, and digital scholarship/digital humanities:

“Embracing semantic ambiguity to enhance interpretability of complex unstructured machine learning problems.” – https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/pra2.2018.14505501144

“Tweeting for social justice in #Ferguson: Affective discourse in Twitter hashtags” – https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/1461444819827030?casa_token=mSwlsllzyaQAAAAA:o8PzOiTUUyS1zCblmTKMvkE1HBromRj1bXExxvk8qiZVg0LItZlr9Ne5y9EW10EqqpWPqi4KwvDI

“Epic social networks and Eve’s centrality in Milton’s Paradise Lost” – https://academic.oup.com/dsh/advance-article/doi/10.1093/llc/fqz001/5365481?guestAccessKey=71453a56-cfdb-48f2-a5bc-ae279bf4b0ac

The University of Cincinnati’s Digital Scholarship Center, located in the Walter C. Langsam Library, is a joint venture between the College of Arts and Sciences and the Libraries.

On campus and in the community, the DSC serves as a catalyst for hybrid forms of research and teaching, bringing together humanistic methods with technical innovations to test paradigms and to create new knowledge at the boundary between disciplines as they are conventionally imagined in humanities.

For more about the DSC, visit their website at http://dsc.uc.edu/