Erin Rinto Joins UC Libraries as Teaching and Research Librarian

Today, Erin Rinto began work at UC Libraries as the new teaching and research librarian in the Research and Teaching Services Department located in the Walter C. Langsam Library. Erin comes to UC from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas where she was the teaching and learning librarian.  Over the past six years at UNLV, she worked to integrate information literacy outcomes into the general education program via sustainable, evidence-based approaches, thus providing her with extensive teaching and research experience. Erin’s primary responsibility will be working with the English Composition program, including serving on the cross-jurisdictional English Composition Committee.

Welcome to UC Libraries, Erin.

 

Tell Us About Your Research Practices and Needs

In order for the University of Cincinnati Libraries to provide the best possible research and data support services, we would like to encourage all faculty, staff and students to participate in a brief survey regarding your research practices and needs.

Taking part in this survey is completely voluntary, but your participation will help us to continue and create more meaningful services centered around your research and data needs. If you agree to participate, please complete the survey via the URL provided to give us more information about your primary research area, the type of data used for your research, and the assistance sought to deal with your data. We appreciate your time and look forward to serving you.

https://redcap.research.cchmc.org/surveys/?s=NAAAF33RH4

ProQuest Downtime on August 18

Update on our August 18 product downtime
Dear Valued Customer:

To maintain the currency and security of ProQuest products, we are performing maintenance on many ProQuest products beginning on August 18, 2018 U.S. Eastern Time. During the maintenance window, the following products will be temporarily unavailable.

Books products: Saturday, August 18 at 12 p.m. U.S. Eastern Time. Maintenance will conclude within 5 hours.

  • Ebook Central

All other products: Saturday, August 18 at 10 p.m. U.S. Eastern Time. Maintenance will conclude within 8 hours.

Research databases

  • ProQuest Platform (search.proquest.com)
  • ProQuest Congressional (search.proquest.com/congressional, congressional.proquest.com)
  • Chadwyck-Healey databases (U.S. customers only)
  • ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Open
  • ProQuest Dissertations & Theses OAI Repository

Reference management/Research support tools

  • RefWorks

 

UC Libraries’ Mark Konecny is Participating in Summit to Examine Affordable Learning Initiatives

Mark Konecny, scholarly communications and digital publishing strategist and a member of the OhioLINK Affordable Learning group, is an organizer of the Affordable Learning Summit at the University of Akron on Aug. 1 & 2. This summit is a gathering of Ohio institutions to share how faculty, library staff, instructional designers and administrators are addressing affordable learning initiatives.

In announcing the summit, Mark writes, “A recent Florida Virtual Survey of over 22,000 students found that 66.5% of students did not purchase the required textbook / course materials solely due to cost. Recently, Inside Higher Ed shared how the University of Georgia has saved students 3.2 million in textbook cost since 2013 by utilizing Open Educational Resources (OER). In addition, they found that switching to OER increased the number of A and A-minus grades students received by 5.50 percent and 7.73 percent, respectively. The number of students who withdrew or were awarded D or F grades (known as the DFW rate) fell by 2.68 percent.”

Mark is presenting a round table discussion with Kelly Broughton (Ohio University) on the integration of the library with press services. He is also participating in a panel discussion with Sean Kennedy (Ohio University) on authorship, discussing the following topics: how OER creators can partner with their local university press for assistance, issues with creating OERS, common stumbling points and realistic timetables for authoring.

“We know that not having the required course materials directly impacts student success, and the OhioLINK Affordable Learning Initiative is dedicated to addressing this problem,” said Mark.

To learn more, visit https://uakron.edu/affordablelearning/events/. The summit is being live tweeted with the hashtag #alohiosummit.

Read Source to Learn How We’re Making Digital Collections More Widely Available and More UC Libraries’ News

sourceRead Source, the online newsletter, to learn more about the news, events, people and happenings in UC Libraries.

In this edition of Source we highlight some of the University of Cincinnati Libraries’ newest endeavors in digital collections. From the latest version of the university’s digital repository, Scholar@UC, to a new archive space for special collections, to our recent membership in the large-scale collaborative repository HathiTrust, UC Libraries has made great strides in increasing our digital footprint and exploring new ways to enhance our user’s scholarship and the ways they can access and utilize our collections.

In addition, read about two exciting projects UC Libraries is involved in: PBS’s Great American Read and the touring exhibit Native Voices: Native Peoples’ Concepts of Health and Illness.

Read these articles, as well as past issues, on the web at http://libapps.libraries.uc.edu/source/ and via e-mail. To receive Source via e-mail, contact melissa.norris@uc.edu to be added to the mailing list.

Center for Open Science Workshop

Recently UC Libraries and the Graduate School hosted the Center for Open Science for two workshops on research reproducibility.  The Center for Open Science, a non-for-profit based in Charlotteville, Va.  promotes openess, integrity and transparency in research.  Ian Sullivan of the COS facilitied the workshop and worked with researchers to address several types of repoducibility issues in research- Computational, Methodological and Results replicability.

Ian Sullivan of the COS works with UC students and Biology faculty Nate Morehouse at reproducibility workshop

Computational reproducibility means that given the data and code/analysis methods used, someone else could reproduce the graphs and calculations in your paper or report.  Methodological reproducibility means that someone else could follow your protocols and rerun the experperiment or research again and get the same results as you did.  And results replicability means that with new data and using your methods and analysis, someone else can come to the same conclusion as you did.

Continue reading Center for Open Science Workshop

What Do Martin Luther, a Hidden Paleontologist and German-Americans Have in Common? They are All in the Latest Source.

sourceRead Source, the online newsletter, to learn more about the news, events, people and happenings in UC Libraries.

This latest issue of Source includes an article from Xuemao Wang, dean and university librarian, about UC Libraries core beliefs and their role on how we achieve our mission “to empower discovery, stimulate learning and inspire the creation of knowledge by connecting students, faculty, researchers and scholars to dynamic data, information and resources.” Kevin Grace, university archivist and head of the Archives and Rare Books Library, writes about a hidden bust of a famous 20th-century paleontologist and philosopher. Two important gifts are announced in this issues of Source – the first, an endowment from the Marge and Charles J. Schott Foundation for the German-Americana Collection; the second, a legacy gift from Sandra and Robert Cohan to benefit musical collections in the Albino Gorno Memorial Library. Exhibits highlighting the Archives and Rare Books Library’s Shakespeare Collection, the 500th anniversary of the Reformation and a book display for Hispanic Heritage Month are also featured in this issue of Source. In addition, a collaboration between the College of Medicine and the Donald C. Harrison Health Sciences Library to create a grant program to partner medical faculty with library informationists is announced.

Read these articles, as well as past issues, on the web at http://libapps.libraries.uc.edu/source/ and via e-mail. To receive Source via e-mail, contact melissa.norris@uc.edu to be added to the mailing list.

History of the Philomathic Society of Cincinnati College

By Leah Wickett

ARB and Ohio Valley History Intern

Cincinnati College, 1819

Founded in 1819, Cincinnati College was home to two literary societies, the Philomathic Society and the Erophoebic Society (which had a bit of a rivalry between them).[1] Students of the College formed the Philomathic Society prior to the opening of the College, on January 18, 1818.[2] The Society’s aim was “for mutual literary improvement” and its first members were John Hough James, Junius James, George Mackey Wilson, Lemuel D. Howells, Robert T. Lytle, and Edward L. Drake.[3] Soon after its creation, the student members created a separate branch of the Philomathic Society for elected members consisting of William Henry Harrison, Thomas Peirce, Daniel Drake, Benjamin Drake, Peyton Short Symmes, as well as “other gentlemen, well known at that day… interested in literary affairs.”[4] On April 3, 1821, Daniel Drake invited the members of the Philomathic Society to join the public commencement of the Medical College being held the following day at Cincinnati College’s Chapel.[5] In the early part of 1821, the Society created a semi-monthly paper called The Olio, which featured local literature and was “the first effort on the part of a literary society, in the West, for development of poetic ability.”[6] The publication contained historical essays, articles, poetry, and the occasional “humorous essay.”[7] The Olio, published and edited by John H. Wood and Samuel S. Brooks, ended after just one year of publication.[8] Continue reading History of the Philomathic Society of Cincinnati College

E-books: The Why, the Wow, the How

down-the-hole-filmWe acquired the first e-book for the Clermont College Library collection in August, 2014. Up to that point, we’d purchased only print. And I love print books, holding them in my hand, flipping the pages.

But as much as I love print books, I appreciate e-books. And here’s why.

Our students can access them from home, in the middle of the night, in their pajamas. They just log-on with off-campus access, search their topic or title and presto…an e-book appears that can be opened and read immediately.

Another reason I like e-books. Our students have access to 1,533,274+ e-books. Can I get a wow?

How do you find an e-book? Go to the library’s web site and in the red box (Summon search box) type in the title or topic you’re looking for. Choose the filters that best suit your search. The results list will indicate if the book is an e-book.

As always, stop by or call the library (732-5233) with any questions.

Penny McGinnis
Technical Services Manager