UC Libraries Mark Chalmers named Drexel University LEADING Fellow

mark chalmersMark Chalmers, science and engineering librarian, has been accepted into Drexel University’s highly selective Library Information Science (LIS) Education and Data Science Integrated Network Group (LEADING) program as a 2021 LEADING Fellow.

The LEADING program is a Laura Bush 21st Century Librarian (LB21) National Digital Infrastructures and Initiatives project, supported by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) and hosted at Drexel University’s College of Computing & Informatics (CCI). The LEADING program scales-up the highly successful LEADS-4-NDP initiative and will prepare a diverse, nation-wide cohort of 50 LIS doctoral students and early to mid-career librarians for data science endeavors.

LEADING Fellows will complete the following:

  • self-paced online preparatory curriculum,
  • an online data science bootcamp with Drexel and other LEADING fellows,
  • six-month virtual data science internship at a LEADING hub or node,
  • development of a communication plan to connect with mentor/s on a regular basis, and
  • development of research output (e.g., a paper, poster, presentation, published data, etc.).

Mark’s LEADING Fellow research project will focus on “Assessing Overlap and Aggregation Potential of Open-Source Software Platforms and Their Data.” LYRASIS, a consortium that provides access to the world’s shared academic, scientific and cultural heritage, currently offers six hosted services on open-source software. Five of the six of which involve academic libraries and their cultural heritage assets. As a result, LYRASIS seeks expertise in cultural heritage metadata and data science to assist in assessing this overlap between platforms. In addition, they seek recommendations on how machine learning models can be leveraged to connect data in different platforms and to assess how researchers can be served by access to data across the different platforms.

“I am eager to work with Drexel and LYRASIS to grow my competencies in the domains of data science, data integration, large scale machine learning and exploratory feasibility projects,” said Mark upon learning of his acceptance into the LEADING program.

“The experience and skills Mark will gain as a LEADING Fellow will not only contribute to the completion of the LYRASIS research project, but he will bring new knowledge back to his role in the Science and Engineering Libraries while at the same time contributing to the university’s digital future and open access agenda,” said Xuemao Wang, vice provost of digital scholarship and dean and university librarian.

UC’s Digital Scholarship Center presents “Digital Integrator and Transdisciplinary Research Partner”

This Association of College and Research Libraries’ (ACRL) Spring 2021 Digital Scholarship Section featured “Digital Integrator & Transdisciplinary Research Partner,” a virtual panel highlighting the University of Cincinnati’s Digital Scholarship Center’s (DSC) unique model and work with research teams focused on misinformation and missing information.

The DSC partnered with UC Libraries’ Research and Data Services Team and the Department of Journalism to research Twitter’s impact on misinformation, false information and conspiracy theories about coronavirus. Using machine learning and linguistic analysis, the team also partnered with Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center to understand the role of missing information in electronic health records as it relates to social determinants of health. During the presentation, the panel discussed the unique organization of the DSC and its partnerships on campus and how health information professionals and the DSC work together on research projects involving social media, social justice and social determinants of health. The recording and slides are available online.

cover slide for presentation Continue reading

April 20 Service Note: Access to library resources is currently down

UPDATE: All access has been restored.

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All access to library resources through the proxy server is currently down. OCLC is working on the issue and we expect a resolution shortly. We apologize for the inconvenience.

If you know the resource URL you are attempting to access, try this page: https://libapps.libraries.uc.edu/proxy/proxygoto.php. The URL for the library catalog, for example, is uclid.uc.edu. You will then be prompted to login using your UC credentials.

“Off the Shelf and into the Lab” May 6th webinar to highlight medical history, preservation and the UC Libraries’ Adopt-A-Book program

Join the Henry R. Winkler Center for the History of the Health Professions and the Cecil Striker Society for the History of Medicine, Thursday, May 6 at 7:00 p.m. for the 3rd lecture in the Cecil Striker Webinar series. Off the Shelf and into the Lab: Medical History, Preservation and the University of Cincinnati Libraries’ Adopt-A-Book Program will demonstrate how the work of the Preservation Lab protects Winkler Center collections and how those interested can support their work through the Libraries’ Adopt-a-Book program.

The webinar will be held on Zoom and the link available soon on the Winkler Center’s website at https://libraries.uc.edu/libraries/hsl/winkler-center/cecil-striker.html.

Speakers:

  • Christa Bernardo, director of development
  • Ashleigh Ferguson Schieszer, conservator and co-manager of the Preservation Lab
  • Holly Prochaska, preservation librarian and co-manager of the Preservation Lab

cecil striker flyer

Originally formed in 1976, the Cecil Striker Society for the History of Medicine was called the Medical History Society. One month after its first meeting Dr. Striker died, prompting members to rename the organization the Cecil Striker Society. Its purpose is to promote and perpetuate an interest in the history of medicine and all related disciplines in the health care field.

Ending the HIV Epidemic, a panel discussion April 21

Join UC Libraries online Wednesday, April 21, 1:00 p.m. for “Ending the HIV Epidemic,” a panel discussion. Learn from various Cincinnati area HIV/AIDS service providers about how long-standing HIV prevention efforts combined with education on treatment, viral load suppression and concerted efforts by multiple agencies are being utilized to make HIV infection a thing of the past and how the public can assist.

Registration required.

hiv panel graphic

Learn a different story about Spring Grove Cemetery and Arboretum at an event April 18

book cover for the speaking stoneJoin Greg Hand online 5:00 p.m., Sunday, April 18 as he interviews Michael Griffith, UC professor of English, about his new book, The Speaking Stone: Stories Cemeteries Tell, published by the University of Cincinnati Press.

While working on a novel, author and longtime Cincinnati resident Michael Griffith starts visiting Spring Grove Cemetery and Arboretum. Soon he’s taking almost daily jaunts, following curiosity and accident wherever they lead. The result is this fascinating collection of essays. Rather than sticking to the cemetery’s most famous, or infamous, graves, Griffith stays true to the principle of ramble and incidental discovery. To purchase the book.

Michael Griffith

Michael Griffith

About the author: Michael Griffith is the author of the novels Trophy and Spikes and the story collection Bibliophilia. He is professor of English at the University of Cincinnati College of Arts and Sciences.

Register by Friday, April 16.

And the winners are…Results of the 2021 UC Libraries International Edible Books Festival

squirrel with donut cake

Best Overall – Rebecca Tabaja – Donut Feed the Squirrels

The University of Cincinnati Libraries celebrated the annual International Edible Books Festival on April 5-9, 2021.

A record 31 edible books were created and featured throughout the week on the Libraries Facebook page, as well as on Twitter and Instagram. Submitted entries included such edible titles as “Coffee,” “LuLu’s Giraffe Bakery,” and “Donut Feed the Squirrels.” Best sellers “Lord of the Rings,” “The Handmaid’s Tale,” “Catch-22,” “Super Fudge” and “The Picture of Dorian Gray” were represented along with children’s books like “Jolly Postman,” “Hair Love,” “Rainbow Fish,” “Little Blue Truck Leads the Way” and “Madeline,” among other literary greats. The edible books were made of cakes, cookies, candy, deviled eggs and even sushi.

Created by librarian Judith A. Hoffberg and artist Béatrice Coron, the International Edible Books Festival is held worldwide annually on or around April 1st to mark the birthday of Jean Brillat-Savarin, author of The Physiology of Taste.  The global event has been celebrated since 2000 in various parts of the world, including in Australia, Brazil, India, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, Mexico, Morocco, The Netherlands, Russia and Hong Kong. Continue reading

June Taylor-Slaughter awarded the university’s 2021 Marian Spencer Equity Ambassador Award for staff

june taylor slaughterJune Taylor-Slaughter, public services and student supervisor in the Geology-Mathematics-Physics Library, has been selected to receive the university’s prestigious 2021 Marian Spencer Equity Ambassador Award for staff.

In the thoughtful words of her numerous nominators:

“June Taylor-Slaughter has dedicated her time and skills to promoting awareness of racial equity and diversity issues throughout her 25+ years at UC. Through formal programs and committees as well as informal personal interactions, she diligently and patiently works to educate her students and coworkers about the racial disparities faced by BIPOC staff in the workplace so we can all work together to improve conditions. She ensures that everyone is well informed and supported by her in their learning.

With the recent heightened awareness of systemic racism, she was part of a team that initiated a survey to address racial equity and systemic racism. This survey resulted in a new committee providing resources and support for racial equity programming in UC Libraries. June is a co-chair of this committee’s first year and is working tremendously hard to ensure its success. 

June ran for the chair of the Libraries’ Staff Advisory Council with a goal to put people of color’s voice at the table and in the senior management’s decision-making process. She’s not shy about sharing her personal experiences of racial disparity. She serves on the newly formed Racial Equity Programming Committee of the Libraries, of which she was instrumental in creating. June is passionate about educating students, staff and faculty with her knowledge and experience.

June’s work touches many people who have never even met her. She has been the organizing energy behind many of the Libraries’ previous events and activities that celebrate diversity, equity, and inclusion. One of my favorite examples of June’s quite visible work is currently on display in the Langsam Library lobby, where she curated an exhibit, “Women of the Movement: Leaders for Civil Rights and Voting Rights” featuring the contributions of Black women movement leaders. It is a vibrant exhibit that pulls in anyone who walks by to learn about this important part of our country’s history.”

Named for the celebrated civil rights activist, the Marian Spencer Equity Ambassador Award showcases current campus-affiliated individuals and groups whose efforts related to diversity, equity, and inclusion have had a positive impact on the university. Nominated by their colleagues, the recipients promote awareness of diversity, equity, and inclusion; exhibit sensitivity to people of various cultures; facilitate growth among colleagues and peers; prepare students, faculty, and staff to thrive in a diverse and global workforce; and collaborate with colleagues to create and implement initiatives and policies that build an equitable and inclusive environment.

Congratulations, June!