A new exhibit in the DAAP Library Exhibit on the Terrace Plaza Hotel September 12-October 31

By Elizabeth Meyer

The Terrace Plaza Hotel by Skidmore, Owings, and Merrill is a Modernist masterpiece in Downtown Cincinnati.  The exhibit features over 40 photographs of the hotel from its heyday in the 40s and 50s.

In addition to photos, architectural plans, letters, newspaper articles, and quotes from those involved in the project, one can also view Rookwood ashtrays, a bottle of Terrace Plaza Kentucky Bourbon, Gourmet Room and Skyline Room menus, other restaurant objects such as spoons, forks, knives, ladles, aperitif glasses, cocktail shakers all adorned with either TPs or rooster logos. Also on view is what is believed to be the only surviving piece of furniture from 1948 –a restored barstool from the cocktail lounge. 

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"Banned Books" in the Archives and Rare Books Library

Cover of Huckleberry Finn

By Janice Schulz

In observance of Banned Books Week, celebrated this year from September 24 through October 1, 2011, the Archives & Rare Books Library has compiled a list of Rare Book titles that have appeared on the American Library Association’s (ALA) most challenged books lists. Each book on our list is presented with an image, challenge incidents, and reasons for challenges.

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Extra! Extra! UC Student Newspapers in the University of Cincinnati Libraries

A new exhibit on display on the 4th floor of Blegen Library traces the development of student newspapers at the University of Cincinnati from the publication of the first paper in 1880 to today. 

The exhibit features a timeline of events in the history of student newspaper production, highlighting the run dates, a short description, and the groups behind the various publications. Examples of each newspaper are displayed.

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Civil War History: General Benjamin Franklin Butler

By Janice Schulz

Our latest installment in the Archives & Rare Books Library’s commemoration of the 150th anniversary of the Civil War focuses on Benjamin Butler, a controversial Union general whose command of New Orleans earned him the nickname, “The Beast.” As commander of Fortress Monroe, Butler coined the phrase “Contraband of War” to refer to slaves that had crossed over to Union territory and were retained by the Union Army. His successful protection of Baltimore and command of the Department of Eastern Virginia earned him the command of the Department of the Gulf, where he took control of the captured city of New Orleans early in 1862. But the accolades ended here, and the rest of his military career was marked with controversy and strife. Eventually he was relieved of his command in the Gulf and of his subsequent command of the Department of Virginia and North Carolina. Continue reading Civil War History: General Benjamin Franklin Butler

Langsam Library Exhibit Features Graphic Novels

By Janice Schulz

You would probably not be surprised to learn that UC Libraries hold copies of Malcolm X’s biography, Fahrenheit 451, Shakespeare’s Macbeth, and Treasure Island. What might surprise you, however, is that these are all titles of graphic novels. A new exhibit currently on display on the fourth floor of Langsam Library features these and many of the other graphic novels available in UC Libraries’ collections. The exhibit was curated by Janice Schulz, University Records Manager and Archives Specialist, and designed by Cole Osborn, former design student.

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Additions to ARB's Greek Life Exhibit

By Janice Schulz

Additions and updates have been made to ARB’s exhibit Going Greek: Fraternity and Sorority Life at the University of Cincinnati.

Omega Psi Phi pledges From Clifton Magazine, Autumn, 1981

Pledging traditions of African-American fraternities are highlighted in an article from the Autumn, 1981, edition of Clifton Magazine, now available on the 1980 and Beyond history page. During the anti-hazing controversies of the early 1980s, long-time pledging rituals practiced by Black fraternities, such as marching and branding, were brought into focus and their legality was questioned. Members defended these activities while outsiders tended to view them with a more critical eye. Continue reading Additions to ARB's Greek Life Exhibit

Historical Cincinnati Maps

A map of Cincinnati in 1869 from The Queen City in 1869 by George E. Stevens

By Janice Schulz

The Archives & Rare Books Library has digitized some historical Cincinnati maps dating from 1802 – 1929 and has made them available for research on our website. The maps are all located in materials from our Rare Books Collection and are scanned at a high resolution to provide detail for researchers.

The maps provide both geographical and social information about the City of Cincinnati through the years. Several of the maps included keys or labels indicating buildings and landmarks and can show trends in public services and the development of particular communities. Continue reading Historical Cincinnati Maps

Civil War History: The Battle of Bull Run

By Janice Schulz

Bull Run - Battlefield of the Morning, July 21, 1861

The first major land battle of the Civil War was fought near Manassas Junction, Virginia, on the banks of Bull Run Creek on July 21, 1861. It was intended by the advancing Federal army to demonstrate their strength and was expected to bring the war to a swift end. It did no such thing. As the conflict began, both sides had confidence in their own superiority over the enemy. Northern civilians went so far as to travel to Bull Run complete with picnic baskets and parasols to watch their glorious army beat the rebels back. Early on it appeared that the Union would come through victorious, but surprise reinforcements arriving for the Confederacy resulted in a Union retreat. Continue reading Civil War History: The Battle of Bull Run

UC Libraries Pay Tribute to UC Authors, Editors & Composers

The 25th annual Authors, Editors and Composers reception and program was held Tuesday, April 12, in the Russell C. Myers Alumni Center. At the event, UC Libraries honored 250 faculty members and their 340 creative and scholarly works published in the year 2010. Participating faculty members represented every UC college plus the Career Development Center, the Division of Professional Practice, the Institute for Policy Research, the Office of Research, and the Libraries.

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