Call for nominations for the 2022 featured UC faculty member Life of the Mind presenter

life of the mind logoThe mission of Life of the Mind is to celebrate UC faculty research, scholarship and creative output and to foster the free and open exchange of ideas and discourse. The annual lecture features interdisciplinary conversations with UC faculty around a distinctive point of view. This year’s Life of the Mind is scheduled as a hybrid event with both in-person and virtual components; therefore, it is not required that the speaker present in person.

The Life of the Mind Steering Committee seeks nominations for the featured UC faculty presenter at the Tuesday, Feb 22, 2022 lecture. The faculty presenter should be an expert in their respective field with a proven record of scholarship or creation of works, as well as be an engaging speaker able to address a diverse audience. The presentation will not simply be a recitation of the faculty member’s work or research, but will promote a point of view and provoke discussion that spans broad intellectual interests from multiple perspectives.

Following the faculty presenter’s lecture, a panel will respond to and discuss the lecture and a moderator will encourage audience engagement. The Life of the Mind event will also celebrate the published or performed creative and scholarly works of UC’s artists, authors, editors & composers with an exhibit and bibliography. Continue reading

Read Source for the news, events, people and happenings in UC Libraries

source graphic

Read Source, the online newsletter, to learn about the news, events, people and happenings in UC Libraries.

In this issue of Source, as we mark the 20th year of publishing our newsletter, Dean Xuemao Wang welcomes students back to campus. We spotlight a library staff member, Ben Kline, and special collections in the DAAP Library and the newly digitized OMI posters, as well as a team bringing research and data services to the university community. In addition, we announce upcoming events – Life of the Mind and The Illustrated Human: The Impact of Andreas Vesalius.

Read these articles, as well as past issues, on the website. To receive Source via e-mail, contact melissa.norris@uc.edu to be added to the mailing list.

Calling all UC Artists, Authors, Editors & Composers to submit creative and scholarly works for inclusion in Life of the Mind

display of booksCalling all UC Artists, Authors, Editors & Composers!

The annual Life of the Mind, interdisciplinary conversations with University of Cincinnati faculty, is tentatively scheduled for Tuesday, Feb. 22, 2022. Once again, the event will celebrate the published or performed creative and scholarly works of UC’s artists, authors, editors & composers with an exhibit and bibliography. To include creative and scholarly works, UC faculty and staff members are invited to self-submit via an online form. Include only those submitted works performed or published between January 1, 2020 and June 20, 2021. Submissions are limited to three per category per artist, author, editor or composer. Categories may include: books, book chapters, journal articles, editing, artwork, photography, plays, musical scores, CDs or DVDs, and more. Contact melissa.norris@uc.edu with any questions.

The mission of Life of the Mind is to celebrate UC research, scholarship and creative output and to foster the free and open exchange of ideas and discourse. It is organized by UC Libraries, Faculty Senate and the Faculty Enrichment Center, and is sponsored by the Office of the Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost. Life of the Mind supports the university’s Research2030 initiative, which focuses on two key objectives: Enhancing UC’s national reputation and emphasizing the impact of UC’s research enterprise. The Life of the Mind lecture creates a platform to exchange interdisciplinary research and foster intellectual conversation. The artists, authors, editors & composers exhibit and bibliography promotes faculty and staff research and creative outcomes.

For information on last year’s event, visit the Life of the Mind website.

Aug. 26th Cecil Striker Lecture to focus on “What Nineteenth Century Hospital Designers Knew about Minimizing Airborne Transmission and Why It’s Been Forgotten.”

cecil striker event graphicThe Henry R. Winkler Center for the History of the Health Professions’ ongoing Cecil Striker Webinar Lecture Series continues on Thursday, Aug. 26 at 7:00 p.m. when Jeanne Kisacky presents “What Nineteenth Century Hospital Designers Knew about Minimizing Airborne Transmission and Why It’s Been Forgotten.”

Jeanne Kisacky uses her background in architectural design to inform her historical research into hospital design and how the built environment has influenced health and illness. A grant from the National Library of Medicine supported the writing and publication of her award-winning book, Rise of the Modern Hospital: An Architectural History of Health and Healing. She is currently working on extending her history of US hospitals to the 1960s, through the Hill-Burton era, the Cold War, and Civil Rights.

For Zoom login credentials and more information please visit the Winkler Center’s website.

Finale of 19-Day Self-Education Challenge Against Systemic Racism scheduled for August 10

respect's 19-day self-education challenge against systemic racismJoin us Tuesday, August 10, 12:30-2pm via WebEx, for a finale of the 19-Day Self-Education Challenge Against Systemic Racism. Whether you took the challenge or not, all are welcome!

The University of Cincinnati Libraries’ R.E.S.P.E.C.T. (Racial Equity Support & Programming to Educate the Community Team organized the 19-day Challenge (July 6-30) with the mission to bring knowledge and consciousness from the disparities of systemic racism in our society. Articles, podcasts and videos were supplied to participants each week with an option to attend a Friday WebEx discussion and/or fill out a questionnaire concerning the week’s subject. Although this enlightening undertaking has ended, our endeavor for racial equity has only begun. The finale event will include a discussion of the various lessons, as well as prizes.

Participate in the 19-Day Self-Education Challenge Against Systemic Racism

respect's 19-day self-education challenge against systemic racismWant to learn more about issues pertaining to systemic racism in the United States but don’t know where to start? Inspired by the YWCA’s 21-Day Racial Equity Challenge, the University of Cincinnati Libraries’ R.E.S.P.E.C.T. committee developed a 19-Day Self-Education Challenge Against Systemic Racism just for you! Sign up now to watch, read and listen to informative pieces! The challenge is free and open to all. 

Scheduled to take place July 6-30, the challenge is divided into four weeks, each with a different theme. There will be weekly, open video-chat discussions every Friday. Details will be e-mailed weekly along with the challenge content. 

  • Week 1: Reparations and Narrowing the Wealth Gap 
  • Week 2: Police Brutality and Reform 
  • Week 3: Equity in Healthcare 
  • Week 4: Equity in Education 

Should you agree to accept this challenge, you will learn new information as well as receive an award upon completion of the event for your efforts to learn more about systemic racism and ways to combat it.  

R.E.S.P.E.C.T. (Racial Equity Support & Programming to Educate the Community Team) is a UC Libraries committee charged with developing external programming that explicitly addresses the negative role that systemic racism plays in our society. 

Read Source, the online newsletter, to learn about the news, events, people and happenings in UC Libraries

sourceRead Source, the online newsletter, to learn about the news, events, people and happenings in UC Libraries.

In this issue of Source, Dean Xuemao Wang takes time to reflect as work begins to transition back on campus and we showcase UC Libraries innovation and impact during the pandemic. In addition to articles highlighting collections such as Albert Sabin’s papers and Obed Wilson’s library, this issue also marks the commemoration of the first national Juneteenth holiday and features an interview with the authors of the recent University of Cincinnati Press book, Bicycling Through Paradise. As our 19th year of publication comes to a close, we feature a retrospective of past covers and a look back at the 2009 Edible Books event.

Read these articles, as well as past issues, on the website. To receive Source via e-mail, contact melissa.norris@uc.edu to be added to the mailing list.

 

Join us June 18 for R.E.S.P.E.C.T. Each Other: The Lasting Impact of Juneteenth

juneteenth event graphicJoin us for R.E.S.P.E.C.T. Each Other: The Lasting Impact of Juneteenth, an online WebEx event scheduled for Friday, June 18, from 10-11:30 am. Registration and link location are available online.

Juneteenth, also known as African American Freedom Day or Emancipation Day, is celebrated on June 19 to mark the emancipation of enslaved people in the United States. The University of Cincinnati Libraries RESPECT Group invites you to learn about the history of the Juneteenth holiday and its lasting and impact on United States culture and society.  

This interactive session will introduce conversations around slavery, racism and modern-day injustices. A prepared presentation will include interviews with formerly enslaved people, videos of culture, music and poetry contrasting the past and present. Come prepared to reflect and share your thoughts and feelings on these topics in this safe space environment. In addition, the program will introduce the newly formed Racial Equity Support & Programming to Educate the Community Team (RESPECT)a UC Libraries committee charged with developing external programming that explicitly addresses the role that systemic racism plays in our society.