How UC Researchers use the Open Science Framework – UC Center for Police Research and Policy

In our second installment of the series “How UC Researchers use the Open Science Framework”, we hear from Hannah McManus, Gabrielle Isaza, and Clair Green-Schwartz, Research Associates with the IACP / UC Center for Police Research and Policy 

Hannah McManus, Gabrielle Isaza, and Clair Green-Schwartz, Research Associates with the IACP / UC Center for Police Research and Policy

Research Project Description or statement about your research interest

The International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP)/University of Cincinnati (UC) Center for Police Research and Policy engages in rigorous research that has practical implications for the field and is intended to serve as a national model for the way law enforcement agencies and researchers work together to help protect communities, safeguard citizens’ rights, and ensure the fair treatment of all individuals.

There is currently a gap between research and practice, and the IACP/UC Center for Police Research and Policy seeks to play an important role in closing that gap. Often times existing research does not provide actionable recommendations that can be easily translated into specific, practical policies and practices that could enhance policing. Moreover, academic researchers often do not have access to all the data that police departments have that is necessary to conduct rigorous and meaningful research on police practices. The goal of the IACP/UC Center for Police Research and Policy is to provide a path for law enforcement and researchers to work together on studies that can drive future practices and policies.

Why did you chose to use the OSF to organize your research/projects?

The IACP/UC Center for Police Research and Policy is funded by the Laura and John Arnold Foundation (LJAF). The LJAF is committed to funding research that meets the most rigorous standards of quality and transparency. As such, we make public our preregistration document for each project, which involves describing the research design in detail before the statistical analyses are performed. Further, we update the Center’s OSF profile as we gather more information on individual projects, and submit all applicable research materials onto the OSF for public viewing. At the end of our research projects, we include the findings either in the form of a written report or a link to a publication or preprint elsewhere. These findings must be freely available in some form, which removes the financial barriers that some may face when trying to access research. The Center’s OSF webpage thus provides a comprehensive overview of an entire research project from start to finish. And further, in the event that a research project does not lead to a peer-reviewed publication, posting the results at OSF serves a valuable informative purpose.

What about the OSF makes this tool a good choice for your project management (i.e. specific function of the OSF)?

The OSF is a useful web platform to centralize all parts of the project from initial idea to final results. It keeps a useful history of documents for us to track changes and progress over time. Ultimately, this tool is most useful in its ability to serve as a platform for transparency in research.

Please use this link for further detail about the Center for Police Research and Policy’s research projects:

https://osf.io/f2drv/

Workshops on Research Reproducibility

Research Reproducibility Workshops

workshops facilitator April Clyburne-Sherin
workshops facilitator April Clyburne-Sherin

UC Libraries and IT@UC are pleased to offer two workshops on Research Reproducibility as part of the Data and Computational Science Series.  We are partnering with Code Ocean to offer these workshop on Oct 3rd and 4th.  The workshops facilitator is April Clyburne-Sherin from Code Ocean.  April is an epidemiologist, methodologist and expert in open science tools, methods, training and community stewardship. She holds an MS in Population Medicine (Epidemiology). Since 2014, she has focused on creating curriculum and running workshops for scientists in open and reproducible research methods and is co-author of FOSTER’s Open Science Training Handbook. She is currently the Director of Scientific Outreach for the reproducibility platform Code Ocean.  Code Ocean (https://codeocean.com/) is a cloud-based computational reproducibility platform that provides researchers and developers an easy way to share, discover and run code published in academic journals and conferences.  Their mission is to make the world’s scientific code more reusable, executable and reproducible.  More information and registration for the workshops can be found at the links below.  Questions?  Email AskData@UC.Edu.  The events are free and open to all.

Workshop 1 — East Campus, Biomedical and Clinical Focus

URL – https://webapps2.uc.edu/ce/FacDev/Workshops/Details/11432

Title: Integrating reproducible best practices into biomedical and clinical research: A hands-on workshop for researchers – Data And Computational Science Series

Date: Wednesday, Oct. 3, 1 – 3pm

Location: Troup Learning Space Conf Rm-MSB G005G

Workshop 2 — West Campus, General Audience

URL – https://webapps2.uc.edu/ce/FacDev/Workshops/Details/11433

Title: Preparing your data and code for reproducible publication: A hands-on workshop for researchers – Data And Computational Science Series

Date: Thursday, Oct. 4, 10am – 12pm

Location: CEAS Library Classroom 850D Baldwin

DCS2 CodeOcean_flyerV2

 

How UC Researchers use the Open Science Framework – Emily Kean

As the first installment of the series “How UC Researchers use the Open Science Framework”, we hear from Emily Kean, Research and Education Librarian and Liaison for Nursing who is based at the Health Sciences Library.

Research Project Description or statement about your research interest I’m incorporated on several research teams from UC Health and the College of Nursing that are conducting systematic or integrative reviews. I’m responsible for generating reproducible search strings that will eventually be published as part of the review manuscripts.

Why did you chose to use the OSF to organize your research/projects? I needed an organization tool that allowed me to track my progress over time and also share my work privately with the entire research team. I used one or two other options before settling on the Open Science Framework. OSF seems to work best for my needs. Adding collaborators is very easy and the design is so intuitive, there isn’t much of a learning curve for training new team members.

What about the OSF makes this tool a good choice for your project management (i.e. specific function of the OSF)? I love the wiki and the fact that multiple people can edit and view the same content simultaneously. Most of my process is documenting term harvesting and testing and the wiki has been the perfect way to organize my work. My research partners can see my progress in real time, and at the end, I have reproducible search strings.

Additional information about the project or using the OSF that you are willing to share: None of my projects are currently public, but one of the features of the OSF that I’m looking forward to using is sharing my sites publicly after our manuscripts are published. Typically, only one search string for a systematic review would be printed, and the OSF will allow me to share all of the progress and multiple completed strings with other interested researchers.

 

Most UC Libraries Closed Labor Day, Monday, Sept. 3

labor dayUC Libraries will be closed Monday, September 3 for Labor Day, except for the Donald C. Harrison Health Sciences Library, which will be open 9am-5pm. This closing includes the Walter C. Langsam Library 4th floor space, which will close Sunday, September 2 at 11pm and re-open Tuesday, September 4 at 7:45am.

A complete listing of library hours can be found online at www.libraries.uc.edu/about/hours.html.

Enjoy the long holiday weekend.

The Open Science Framework – a tool to help you organize and collaborate on research projects

Welcome back to campus!  As you begin to plan out your research projects or continue on going research, you may find a need to tie down all the working parts of your projects.  One tool that can help you is the Open Science Framework.  This tool developed by the Center for Open Science is a easy to use platform that allows you to create a structure to organize projects, invite collaborators, share within your research group and with the research community at large.  The mission of the COS is to promote transparency and reproducibility in research through practice and resource development.  Though the words open and science appear in the name, the projects you manage within the OSF are private from the start and made only public if you choose to share.  And you can share a part or all of the project as you wish.  And it is not just a STEM platform.  Any group needing to organize a project can use the OSF.  UC has a dedicated portal to the OSF at https://osf.uc.edu .

Over the next few weeks, stop back to Liblog to learn more about how UC researchers are using the OSF to facilitate their research projects.

XSEDE HPC Workshop: BIG DATA – Data & Computational Science Series

As part of the Data and Computational Science Series funded by the Provost Office, IT@UC and UC Libraries will host the XSEDE HPC Workshop: BIG DATA workshop.  

The University of Cincinnati is pleased to be a remote site for the XSEDE HPC Workshop on Big Data. This 2-day workshop will focus on topics including Hadoop and SPARK. Please bring a lap top, lunch will be provided both days.

When: Wednesday and Thursday September 5-6, 2018; 11am – 5pm

LocationUniversity Hall 4th floor suite, Room 420B

Free Registration (required) Click Here!

Note: You need an XSEDE account to register: Create Account

Tentative Schedule (Eastern Standard Time)

Special Instructions: Participants should bring their own laptop, no previous HPC experience needed, lunch will be provided.

Parking: Kingsgate/University Hall Parking Garage or UC North Shuttle

DCS2 XSEDE BIG DATA flyer1

Questions? Contact Jane Combs at combsje@ucmail.uc.edu

XSEDE (eXtreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment) is a virtual system that provides compute resources for scientists and researchers from all over the country. Its mission is to facilitate research collaboration among institutions, enhance research productivity, provide remote data transfer, and enable remote instrumentation. XSEDE is funded by National Science Foundation (NSF). Getting Started Guide for XSEDE.

XSEDE HPC  OpenMP workshop August 7, 2018 11am – 5pm

As part of the Data and Computational Science Series funded by the Provost Office, IT@UC and UC Libraries will host a XSEDE HPC  OpenMP workshop.  

The University of Cincinnati is pleased to be a remote site for the XSEDE HPC Workshop on OpenMP, taught by the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center. This workshop is intended to give C and Fortran programmers a hands-on introduction to OpenMP programming. Attendees will leave with a working knowledge of how to write scalable codes using OpenMP.

When: Tuesday August 7, 2018 – 11am – 5pm

Location: CECH Library Room 320, Teachers-Dyer Complex

Free Registration (required) Click Here!

Note: You need an XSEDE account to register: Create Account

Tentative Schedule (Eastern Standard Time)

Special Instructions: Participants should bring their own laptop, no previous HPC experience needed, lunch will be provided.

Parking: Stratford Heights Garage, 2630 Stratford Avenue

Questions? Contact Jane Combs at combsje@ucmail.uc.edu

DCS2 OpenMP flyer

XSEDE (eXtreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment) is a virtual system that provides compute resources for scientists and researchers from all over the country. Its mission is to facilitate research collaboration among institutions, enhance research productivity, provide remote data transfer, and enable remote instrumentation. XSEDE is funded by National Science Foundation (NSF). Getting Started Guide for XSEDE.