Books by the Banks Brings Bestselling Authors to Cincinnati

books by the banksFor more than a decade, the region’s biggest book festival has brought the best in literature to downtown Cincinnati. This year’s festival is no different and will feature more than 130 authors, as well as literary themed activities for all ages.
The 11th annual Books by the Banks: Cincinnati Regional Book Festival will be held 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 28 at Duke Energy Convention Center, 525 Elm St., Downtown Cincinnati. UC Libraries is an organizing partner of the literary event along with the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County, Mercantile Library, Northern Kentucky University Library, Gateway Community and Technical College, MidPointe Library System, Lane Libraries and Clermont County Library.

Many bestselling national authors will be present at the event, including:

  • Kate DiCamillo, the author of “Because of Winn Dixie” and one of only a handful of people to have been honored with not one, but two Newbery Medals.
  • Lauren Oliver, best-selling author of many young adult novels, including “Before I Fall,” which was recently adapted as a major motion picture.
  • Stephanie Powell Watts, a literary newcomer but already an award winner with her novel “No One is Coming to Save Us.”
  • Matt Bellassai, Buzzfeed writer and YouTube sensation.
  • Gretchen Carlson, returning to Cincinnati, cut her teeth as a reporter for WCPO before heading to Fox News. She has now become a spokesperson against sexual harassment in the workplace with her book “Be Fierce.”
  • It is again a banner year for children’s authors including Rafael Lopez, Ben Clanton, Will Hillenbrand, Loren Long, Chris Grabenstein and many more.

Several authors at the festival have a UC connection, including:

  • Phillip J. Obermiller, co-author of “The Cincinnati Human Relations Commission: A History, 1943 – 2013,” is a senior visiting scholar in the College of Design, Architecture, Art, and Planning’s School of Planning.
  • Obermiller’s co-author, Thomas E. Wagner, is professor emeritus in the School of Planning.
  • Judy McCarty Kuhn, editor-in-chief of the 1966-67 “News Record,” is a retired Cincinnati English, history and journalism teacher. Her book, “The Other UC and Me: Editing the Sixties,” talks about her experiences at the newspaper.

The day-long festival will feature book signings, author panels and activities for the entire family to enjoy in the Kids’ Corner and Teen Scene. The popular “Writing and Getting Published” series returns this year with panel discussions covering hot topics for writers and workshops to help hone the craft of writing. Attendees will have the opportunity to meet authors and purchase signed copies of their books. Books by the Banks features writers in various categories, including fiction, non-fiction, cooking, children’s literature, local travel, sports and more.

All events are free and open to the public. For more information, and to see a complete schedule of events, visit www.booksbythebanks.org.

Scholar@UC Upgrade and Content Freeze

Scholar@UC is undergoing an upgrade!  On Oct. 19 or soon after, Scholar@UC will freeze content to undergo a planned migration to an upgraded platform, “Scholar 3.0”.  During the freeze, all content including works, collections, and user profiles will be available but read-only; submitting new content will not be possible during this time.  The content freeze is projected to last a little over one week (restoring full access on October 30th or soon after).  Once the migration is complete, an all-clear email will be sent out and new content contributions and changes can resume.

The Scholar@UC 3.0 upgrade includes some exciting new features: Continue reading Scholar@UC Upgrade and Content Freeze

Named Glassware, Notes from the Oesper Collections, No. 46, September/October 2017

Assorted 19th-century round-bottom wine flasks from the Oesper Collections
Assorted 19th-century round-bottom wine flasks
from the Oesper Collections

Issue 46 explains that common laboratory glassware is often named after famous chemists of the past, though the exact reason for these name choices is not always obvious.

Click here for all other issues of Notes from the Oesper Collections and to explore the Jensen-Thomas Apparatus Collection.

 

 

 

 

 

Nobel Prize in Literature Awarded to Kazuo Ishiguro

The 2Kazuo Ishiguro017 Nobel prize in literature has been awarded to the British author Kazuo Ishiguro “who, in novels of great emotional force, has uncovered the abyss beneath our illusory sense of connection with the world”.

Ishiguro was born in 1954 in Nagasaki, Japan. His family moved to England in 1960.  He was raised bilingual and bi-cultural. He received a B.A. with honors in philosophy and literature from the University of Kent and a M.A. in creative writing from the University of East Anglia. He published his first novel, A Pale View of Hills, in 1982. It was recognized with Winifred Holtby Award from the Royal Society of Literature in 1983. Ishiguro’s second novel, An Artist of the Floating World (1986) was also a success as evidenced by Whitbread Book of the Year Award. In 1989 the author won the prestigious Booker Prize for his bestseller The Remains of the Day. Ishiguro was named to the Order of the British Empire for his literary work in 1995.

Two of Ishiguro’s novels were adapted into feature films: The Remains of the Day (1993, starring Anthony Hopkins and Emma Thompson) and Never Let Me Go (2010, directed by Alex Garland).

His most recent novel, The Buried Giant (2015), is set in the times of King Arthur and explores themes from British folklore.

UC Libraries’ collections feature a number of books by Kazuo Ishiguro, including records of conversations with the author. Library databases, such as Literary Resource Center and Literature Resources Center, provide a wealth of information about Kazuo Ishiguro and his works.

The Nobel Prize in Literature has been awarded to 114 authors since 1901. Past laureates include Rabindranath Tagore, Bob Dylan, John Steinbeck, Pablo Neruda, Gabriel García Márquez, and Ernest Hemingway.

 

 

 

 

 

Olga Hart

References

“Facts on the Nobel Prize in Literature”. Nobelprize.org. Nobel Media AB 2014. Web. 5 Oct 2017. http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/facts/literature/index.html

“Kazuo Ishiguro.” Contemporary Authors Online, Gale, 2016. Literature Resource Center. Accessed 5 Oct. 2017.

“Kazuo Ishiguro.” Contemporary Literary Criticism Select, Gale, 2008. Literature Resource Center. Accessed 5 Oct. 2017.

“The Nobel Prize in Literature 2017”. Nobelprize.org. Nobel Media AB 2014. Web. 5 Oct 2017. http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/literature/laureates/2017/

Revealing the Cincinnati Irish

By:  Kevin Grace

Mollie Gilmartin Death CertificateIn 1866, dozens of Cincinnatians, many of them veterans of the Civil War, helped launch an unsuccessful Irish invasion of Canada.  After capture by British and Canadian forces, these Cincinnati Irish were repatriated and they came home.  In 1894, a young Irish immigrant by the name of Mary “Mollie” Gilmartin, living in Cincinnati’s West End, was killed by a man who had stalked her from County Sligo.  Mollie was buried without a grave marker and then forgotten for almost a century.  In 1908, a little girl from the Avondale neighborhood wrote her Christmas letter to Santa Claus.  Elainae, the six-year-old of a wealthy family asked for a doll and for an Irish maid.  And in the 1920s, Ireland’s political leader Éamon de Valera came to Cincinnati to raise money for his emerging independent country.  The Cincinnati Irish had deep pockets with an abiding connection to their heritage.  These are all fairly disparate stories that touch upon just one of the ethnic groups that shaped Cincinnati then, but what meaning is to be found in them now?  How are commonalities with other groups, other eras, and other places discovered and studied? Continue reading Revealing the Cincinnati Irish

Caring for Cincinnati’s Children: The Cincinnati House of Refuge and Beyond

The Cinicnnati House of Refuge in 1856
The House of Refuge from the 1856 Annual Report of the House of Refuge

Last year, I wrote a short history of the Cincinnati House of Refuge for a website that is currently under development by some UC Librarians which will make the data from ARB’s digitized Cincinnati House of Refuge records more easily searchable.   While conducting research on the history of the House of Refuge, I became intrigued with how Cincinnati dealt with children whose parents for one reason or another were unable to care for them in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.  The Cincinnati House of Refuge was designed as a facility for juvenile delinquents, but over time it also came to house children who had nowhere else to go.  This fall I am beginning a research quest to piece together why this happened, and when and what alternatives to the House of Refuge were established.  I will be writing a series of blog posts on what I find.  This first one, though, will provide some background on Cincinnati’s House of Refuge. Continue reading Caring for Cincinnati’s Children: The Cincinnati House of Refuge and Beyond

Coming Soon – Center for Open Science Workshop – Oct 25th

 

Members of the CCDC – Ruoxia Zhao, Emily Westbrook, ReJeana Cary, DeVonna Gatlin, Priti Thakur (kneeling) Zhao Yu, Becca Haley, Niranga Wijesiri and Megan Schmale showing off their beautiful COS tee-shirts

UC Libraries and The Graduate School are pleased to host the Center for Open Science for a workshop on Increasing Openness and Reproducibility in Quantitative Research on October 25, 2017The workshop will cover project documentation, version control, pre-analysis plans and the Open Science Framework.  There will be two sessions of the workshop, one on East campus and one on the West campus.  The event is free and open to all.  To register, visit https://goo.gl/Hf5neh.  Participants are asked to bring their own device for best workshop experience.

 Questions? Please email Amy Koshoffer at ASKDATA@UC.EDU for more information.

 Workshop Information:

 

Date: October 25, 2017

 Session 1

Time: 9am – 12pm

Location: East Campus – Troup Learning Space – MSB G005G

 Session 2

Time: 1:30pm – 4:30pm

Location: West Campus – 480 Langsam Library

 

 

What Do Martin Luther, a Hidden Paleontologist and German-Americans Have in Common? They are All in the Latest Source.

sourceRead Source, the online newsletter, to learn more about the news, events, people and happenings in UC Libraries.

This latest issue of Source includes an article from Xuemao Wang, dean and university librarian, about UC Libraries core beliefs and their role on how we achieve our mission “to empower discovery, stimulate learning and inspire the creation of knowledge by connecting students, faculty, researchers and scholars to dynamic data, information and resources.” Kevin Grace, university archivist and head of the Archives and Rare Books Library, writes about a hidden bust of a famous 20th-century paleontologist and philosopher. Two important gifts are announced in this issues of Source – the first, an endowment from the Marge and Charles J. Schott Foundation for the German-Americana Collection; the second, a legacy gift from Sandra and Robert Cohan to benefit musical collections in the Albino Gorno Memorial Library. Exhibits highlighting the Archives and Rare Books Library’s Shakespeare Collection, the 500th anniversary of the Reformation and a book display for Hispanic Heritage Month are also featured in this issue of Source. In addition, a collaboration between the College of Medicine and the Donald C. Harrison Health Sciences Library to create a grant program to partner medical faculty with library informationists is announced.

Read these articles, as well as past issues, on the web at http://libapps.libraries.uc.edu/source/ and via e-mail. To receive Source via e-mail, contact melissa.norris@uc.edu to be added to the mailing list.