Suzanne Bratt Joins the CCM Library as Cataloging Specialist

On Monday, Sept. 16, Suzanne Bratt joined the staff of the Albino Gorno Memorial (CCM) Library as the cataloging specialist.

Suzanne graduated with a BA in music from Yale University, and with her PhD in musicology from the University of Pennsylvania. Over the past year, she has worked as a library intern at the Curtis Institute of Music, focusing on cataloging archival materials and processing ILL requests. Previous experience included working at UPenn’s Graduate Student Center as a “Navigating the Dissertation” and “Navigating the Grant” fellow. Suzanne’s research interests include the music of J. S. Bach, early Beethoven, the history of music printing, opera history and early chamber music. Her future interests include pursuing qualifications in music librarianship.

Please join us in warmly welcoming Suzanne to UC Libraries!

Elizabeth Meyer Appointed Head of the Deshon, Schlachter DAAP Library

DAAP Library
Interior of the DAAP Library

Elizabeth Meyer has been appointed head of the Robert A. Deshon and Karl J. Schlachter Library for Design, Architecture, Art and Planning (DAAP) effective immediately. Elizabeth has been graciously serving as the interim head of the DAAP Library since 2017. In her interim role, Elizabeth has been commended for her commitment to outstanding services and collections at the DAAP library, her creativity and her vision of how to engage with the faculty and students of DAAP to ensure a vital library presence with their innovative programs and research interests.

Elizabeth began working at UC Libraries in 2004 as the visual resources librarian. She holds an MLS from Indiana University, and a BA in art history from DAAP. Her research interests include Cincinnati modernist architecture and historic preservation, and she has continually engaged with the design and architecture communities in the Cincinnati metropolitan area, securing unique papers, archives and special collections that benefit both DAAP and the broader research community.

Congratulations, Elizabeth, on her new role as the Head of the DAAP Library!

Some Photographic Equipment 1: Cameras : Notes from from the Oesper Collections, No. 57, July/August 2019

A circa 1948 Kodak Duaflex Camera with flash attachment made by the Eastman Kodak Company of Rochester, NY.
A circa 1948 Kodak Duaflex Camera with flash
attachment made by the Eastman Kodak Company of Rochester, NY.

Though the Oesper Collections do not explicitly collect photographic equipment, a few interesting items have come our way over the years and will be described in this and the succeeding two installments of museum notes.  Click here for issue no. 57.

Click here for all other issues of Notes from the Oesper Collections and to explore the Jensen-Thomas Apparatus Collection.

 

Book of the Month for September 2019

Your UCBA Library’s Book of the Month for September:

Money: 5000 Years of Debt and Power 

by Michel Aglietta 

Money book cover 

As the financial crisis reached its climax in September 2008, the most important figure on the planet was Federal Reserve chairman Ben Bernanke. The whole financial system was collapsing, with little to stop it. When a senator asked Bernanke what would happen if the central bank did not carry out its rescue package, he replied, “If we don’t do this, we may not have an economy on Monday.” 

What saved finance, and the Western economy, was fiscal and monetary stimulus – an influx of money, created ad hoc. It was a strategy that raised questions about the unexamined nature of money itself, an object suddenly revealed as something other than a neutral signifier of value. Through its grip on finance and the debt system, money confers sovereign power on the economy. If confidence in money is not maintained, crises follow. Looking over the last 5,000 years, Michel Aglietta explores the development of money and its close connection to sovereign power. This book employs the tools of anthropology, history and political economy in order to analyse how political structures and monetary systems have transformed one another. We can thus grasp the different eras of monetary regulation and the crises capitalism has endured throughout its history. 

Is it checked out?  Don’t worrywe’ve got you covered: 

The Ascent of Money: a Financial History of the World (DVD)
HG171 .A83 2009 

Bestselling author, economist and historian Niall Ferguson takes a look at how money evolved, from the concept of credit and debt in the Renaissance to the emergence of a global economy and the subprime crisis we face today 

A History of Money (E-Book) 

A History of Money looks at how money as we know it developed through time. Starting with the barter system, the basic function of exchanging goods evolved into a monetary system based on coins made up of precious metals and, from the 1500s onwards, financial systems were established through which money became intertwined with commerce and trade, to settle by the mid-1800s into a stable system based upon Gold. This book presents its closing argument that, since the collapse of the Gold Standard, the global monetary system has undergone constant crisis and evolution continuing into the present day. 

Digital Gold: Bitcoin and the Inside Story of the Misfits and Millionaires Trying to Reinvent Money 
HG1710 .P68/ 2015

The notion of a new currency, maintained by the computers of users around the world, has been the butt of many jokes, but that has not stopped it from growing into a technology worth billions of dollars, supported by the hordes of followers who have come to view it as the most important new idea since the creation of the Internet. Believers from Beijing to Buenos Aires see the potential for a financial system free from banks and governments. More than just a tech industry fad, Bitcoin has threatened to decentralize some of society’s most basic institutions. An unusual tale of group invention, Digital Gold charts the rise of the Bitcoin technology through the eyes of the movement’s colorful central characters, including a British anarchist, an Argentinian millionaire, a Chinese entrepreneur, Tyler and Cameron Winklevoss, and Bitcoin’s elusive creator, Satoshi Nakamoto. Already, Bitcoin has led to untold riches for some, and prison terms for others. 

 

by Christian Boyles

Got Data?! Join Us for the Data Visualization Showcase Oct. 25

The University of Cincinnati Libraries’ Research & Data Services is calling for virtual submissions that best demonstrate the power of visualization to present complex data.

Event

The Data Visualization Showcase will be held from 1-3 pm on Friday, Oct. 25, 2019 in the Visualization Laboratory (240H Braunstein Hall, Geology-Mathematics-Physics Library). Coffee and refreshments will be served. All are welcome.

Eligibility & Deadlines

Submissions for the showcase are open to all University of Cincinnati affiliates, but must be submitted to AskData@uc.edu by Oct. 11 to be considered for the awards. All submissions will be evaluated by a panel of judges and should follow submission guidelines.

Judging

The showcase will be juried by a panel of interdisciplinary judges scoring each submission on the following four tenants of data visualization: Impact, Storytelling, Technical Aptitude and Creativity. See the rubric for more details.

Continue reading Got Data?! Join Us for the Data Visualization Showcase Oct. 25

10 year anniversary STRC@Langsam YouTube site

10 years ago on September 1st 2009 the STRC uploaded their first video to YouTube.   The video was of a old book that was sent to UCL’s Conservation and Binding department.  They needed a quick way to show someone in California how the book would be repaired. 10 years later the STRC site has 300 videos, 400,000 views and 367 subscribers.  178 of the videos are UC student projects made at the STRC editing suites and STRC video production room.  Below is a link to the most viewed student project (Tom Cruise on Teaching Composition) with 15,000 views. And also below is a link to the first video added 10 years ago, (Conservation of book) with 7,300 views.

 

videos STRC

 

Welcome, Melissa Previtera, Health Sciences Library/Winkler Center Academic & Research Services Specialist

On Tuesday, Sept. 3, Melissa Previtera began her position at the University of Cincinnati Libraries as the academic and research services specialist for the Donald C. Harrison Health Sciences Library (HSL) and the Henry R. Winkler Center for the History of the Health Professions (Winkler Center).

Melissa is a familiar face in UC Libraries having worked previously in the HSL/Winkler Center, College of Engineering and Applied Science Library, and most recently at the College of Education, Criminal Justice and Human Services Library. In this new role, she will work closely with HSL and Winkler Center faculty as well as members of the Winkler Center Board, College of Medicine, College of Nursing, College of Pharmacy and Allied Health faculty, researchers, staff and students.

Welcome (back), Melissa!

Most UC Libraries Closed Labor Day, Monday, Sept. 2

labor dayUC Libraries will be closed Monday, September 2 for Labor Day, except for the Donald C. Harrison Health Sciences Library, which will be open 9am-5pm. This closing includes the Walter C. Langsam Library 4th floor space, which will close Sunday, September 1 at 11pm and re-open Tuesday, September 3 at 7:45am.

A complete listing of library hours can be found online at www.libraries.uc.edu/about/hours.html.

Enjoy the long holiday weekend.

The Archives and Rare Books Library presents the 2nd annual German-Americana Lecture, which will feature Frederic Krome

August, Hans and Adelaide Schiller
August, Hans and Adelaide Schiller

The second annual German-Americana lecture, scheduled for Thursday, Sept. 19, 3-4:30 p.m., in Annie Laws (407 Teachers/Dyer), will feature Frederic Krome, professor of history at UC Clermont College who will speak about his recent research on the unpublished memoirs of a World War I German soldier. “In Times of War: Hans Schiller’s Recovered Memoirs” will provide a fascinating window into the motivations and experiences of Hans Schiller during tumultuous times, without the extensive post war re-writing so common to what historians are starting to refer to as “Ego Documents.”

Enlisting in the German Army in the fall of 1914, Hans Schiller fought on the Eastern, Italian and Western fronts during the war, and with the Freikorps in the Baltic from 1919-21. Sometime in 1922, as he was recovering from Scarlet Fever, Hans Schiller collated his notes and wrote a memoir of his military service. The handwritten memoir was then placed in a box, where it lay as Schiller married, had a family, and in 1939 was recalled to active duty as an occupation administrator in Eastern Europe. In January 1945 he committed suicide and his manuscript, still in the box, came to his younger daughter, who immigrated to the U.S. in the 1950s. It was re-discovered by Karin Wagner, Schiller’s granddaughter, shortly before her mother’s death.

frederic krome
Frederic Krome

Frederic Krome, (Ph.D. University of Cincinnati, 1992) taught at Northern Kentucky University (1992-98) before becoming the managing editor of the American Jewish Archives Journal at the Jacob Rader Marcus Center of the American Jewish Archives, Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion. Since 2007 he has taught at the University of Cincinnati. His publications include The Jews of Cincinnati (with John Fine), The Jewish Hospital and Cincinnati Jews in Medicine (2015), and Fighting the Future War: An Anthology of Science Fiction War Stories, 1914-45 (2012), along with numerous articles and book reviews.

Organized by the Archives and Rare Books Library, the German-Americana Lecture is free and open to all, but reservations are requested to jennifer.mackiewicz@uc.edu or by phone at (513) 556-1394.

The German-Americana Lecture is generously supported by The Charlotte and Edward Unnewehr Fund for the German-Americana Collection made possible by the Marge and Charles J. Schott Foundation.

Research Labs @ GMP Library News update – Zhiyuan Yao Attends the AAG-UIUC Summer School

Zhiyuan Yao is one of two GIS support students working in the Research & Data Service research labs at the Geology Math and Physics Library.  The Data & GIS collab is open to students, staff and faculty seeking help with their geospatial data needs, and the Visualization lab is open for data visualization consultations and collaborative work.  Email us at ASKData@ucmail.uc.edu for more information.  

Great learning and collaboration experience in AAG-UIUC Summer School

This summer in July, I was honored to be offered the opportunity to attend AAG-UIUC 2019 Summer School, which focused on Reproducible Problem Solving with Cyber GIS and Geospatial Data Science. During the one-week summer camp, I met many scholars, got access to the supercomputer Virtual Roger through CyberGIS-Jupter, learned the cutting-edge advances regarding geospatial data science, and got a deeper understanding about reproducibility and replicability. I absolutely had a wonderful time there, and this experience provoked me to think more about how we could develop novel solutions to complex problems.

 

Participants in the AAG-UIUC summer school with mentor Diana Sinton (Ex Director of UCGIS in the  green shirt) in the middle.

Continue reading Research Labs @ GMP Library News update – Zhiyuan Yao Attends the AAG-UIUC Summer School