Research Labs @ GMP Library News update – Zhiyuan Yao Attends the AAG-UIUC Summer School

Zhiyuan Yao is one of two GIS support students working in the Research & Data Service research labs at the Geology Math and Physics Library.  The Data & GIS collab is open to students, staff and faculty seeking help with their geospatial data needs, and the Visualization lab is open for data visualization consultations and collaborative work.  Email us at ASKData@ucmail.uc.edu for more information.  

Great learning and collaboration experience in AAG-UIUC Summer School

This summer in July, I was honored to be offered the opportunity to attend AAG-UIUC 2019 Summer School, which focused on Reproducible Problem Solving with Cyber GIS and Geospatial Data Science. During the one-week summer camp, I met many scholars, got access to the supercomputer Virtual Roger through CyberGIS-Jupter, learned the cutting-edge advances regarding geospatial data science, and got a deeper understanding about reproducibility and replicability. I absolutely had a wonderful time there, and this experience provoked me to think more about how we could develop novel solutions to complex problems.

 

Participants in the AAG-UIUC summer school with mentor Diana Sinton (Ex Director of UCGIS in the  green shirt) in the middle.

Continue reading Research Labs @ GMP Library News update – Zhiyuan Yao Attends the AAG-UIUC Summer School

XSEDE High Performance Computing (HPC) Boot Camp

Posted on behalf of Amy Latessa,  Research Coordinator for IT@UC Research & Development

The Data & Computational Science Series presents:
XSEDE High Performance Computing (HPC) Boot Camp

Free Registration (required)

Description: This 4-day event will include MPI, OpenMP, OpenACC and accelerators. This event will be presented using the Wide Area Classroom(WAC) training platform and will conclude with a special hybrid exercise contest that will challenge the students to apply their skills over the following 3 weeks and be awarded the Fifth Annual XSEDE Summer Boot Camp Championship Trophy.  In addition, an XSEDE Badge will be available to those who complete the Challenge.

Tentative Agenda

When: June 3-6, 2019

Location: Langsam Library room 462

2911 Woodside Drive
Cincinnati, OH 45221

 

Note: You need an XSEDE account to register Create Account

Parking: Woodside Avenue Garage

Special Instructions: Participants should bring their own laptop, lunch will be provided.

Questions? Contact Amy Latessa 

XSEDE (eXtreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment) is a virtual system that provides compute resources for scientists and researchers from all over the country. Its mission is to facilitate research collaboration among institutions, enhance research productivity, provide remote data transfer, and enable remote instrumentation. XSEDE is funded by National Science Foundation (NSF).  Getting Started Guide for XSEDE.

 

 

Reflections of UC Data Day 2019 –

Article Written by Rebecca Olson – Social Science and Business Informationist.

On April 1, 2019, UC Libraries hosted the 4th annual Data Day Conference. A celebration of research being held on campus, in the local area, and on the national and international level, this year’s focus was on Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in data.

The first keynote speaker, Amanda J. Wilson, detailed the All of Us program the National Library of Medicine and National institute of Health have funded and promoted. Individuals are allowed to take charge of their health by participating in and directing research. Parts of the program include providing access to resources at libraries, community centers, and laundromats to reach the broadest population.

Continue reading Reflections of UC Data Day 2019 –

Amy Koshoffer Named to the 2019 Cohort of TRELIS Fellows

Amy Koshoffer

Amy Koshoffer, science informationist in the Geology-Mathematics-Physics Library, was named to the 2019 cohort of TRELIS Fellows. Amy will join colleagues from around the country in Washington, D.C. at a workshop designed for professional development for women educators in geospatial sciences.

Below is the press release issued by TRELIS naming Amy to the cohort. Congratulations!

_____________________________

In June 2019, the TRELIS project, Training and Retaining Leaders in STEM-Geospatial Sciences, will hold its second workshop in Washington, D.C. TRELIS is a unique model for professional development for women educators in the geospatial sciences. The program builds leadership capacity and skills to address career development, communication, conflict resolution, and work-life integration. With the name, we instill the concept of a human capital trellis or scaffold of support, and embrace the reality of nonlinear career trajectories that move sideways, take leaps, and do not follow a single upward ladder. There is significant demand for TRELIS-related knowledge and support in the geospatial sciences, reflected in part by the large pool of applicants to TRELIS events each year.

We are pleased to announce the following members of our 2019 cohort. These TRELIS Fellows will participate in a 3-day workshop that has been designed to target topics and concerns of early-career individuals and focus on envisioning and crafting leadership pathways. Immediately following the workshop, the TRELIS Fellows will continue their professional development exchanges during the UCGIS Symposium.

 

  • Clio Andris, Pennsylvania State University
  • Sara Carr, Northeastern University
  • Li (Kerry) Fang, Florida State University
  • Kelly Gleason, Portland State University
  • Melinda Kernik, University of Minnesota
  • Marynia Kolak, University of Chicago
  • Amy Koshoffer, University of Cincinnati
  • Huyen Le, Virginia Tech University
  • Samiah Moustafa, Brown University
  • Stephanie Rogers, Auburn University
  • Vanessa Rojas, State University of New York – ESF
  • Donna Selch, Stony Brook University
  • Di Shi, University of Kansas
  • Monica Stephens, University at Buffalo
  • Caixia Wang, University of Alaska at Anchorage
  • Jennifer Watts, Woods Hole Research Center

TRELIS is managed by a leadership team from the University of Maine, Hunter College, the University of Colorado, the University of Southern California, Arizona State University, Tableau Software, and the University Consortium for Geographic Information Science (UCGIS). It is supported with generous funding from the National Science Foundation (NSF Grant #1660400). For more information, contact Kate Beard, TRELIS PI, at the University of Maine or look for resources at www.ucgis.org/TRELIS.

Workshop on Research Reproducibility and Data Visualization using R.

Join UCLibraries and IT@UC for a workshop on Research Reproducibility and Data Visualization using R (part of the Data and Computational Science Series (funded by the Provost Office through a universal provider grant).

 

On April 16th, Dr. Mine Cetinkaya-Rundel, Associate Professor at Duke University and Data Scientist & Professional Educator at RStudio will be on campus to give a presentation about Reproducible Research and conduct a workshop on Data Visualization in R.

The day’s schedule is below.  The venue will be the Data Visualization Space in the Geology-Math-Physics Library – 240H Braunstein Hall.

10:00 am to 11:00 am  Presentation – Reproducible Research

11:00 am to 12:00 pm  Meet and Greet with Dr. Cetinkaya-Rundel  (Lunch provided)

12:00 pm to 2:00 pm  Workshop – Data Visualization in R with ggplot2 and gganimate

 

These events are free and open to all.

Visit the Faculty One Stop website to register.

More information about the DCSS 2019 series can be found on the DCSS website .

Flyer: DCS2 Word flyer_Rstudio

Data Visualization Lunch & Learn and Hands-on Shiny Workshop – Nov 28th 11:45 am to 3 pm

Join us Wednesday, November 28 for a Lunch & Learn and Hands-on Shiny Workshop with Dr. Olga Scrivner, Research Scientist at Indiana University’s Cyberinfrastructure for Network Science Center. REGISTER

Olga Scrivner is a research scientist at Cyberinfrastructure for Network Science Center (CNS) in the School of Informatics, Computing, and Engineering at Indiana University, a faculty fellow at the Center of Excellence for Women in Technology, and a corporate faculty in Data Analytics at Harrisburg University of Science and Technology. She has substantive expertise in developing web application tools for data mining and visualization using Shiny and R. Her current research at CNS focuses on mapping of occupational landscape and educational attainment, with specific emphasis in understanding the healthcare workforce in the areas affected by opioid epidemic.

Wednesday November 28 in Langsam Library room 475  LUNCH WILL BE PROVIDED.


11:45AM – 1PM: LUNCH & LEARN – THE IMPORTANCE OF DATA VISUALIZATION
If a picture is worth of a thousand words, data visualization is worth millions: Toward a framework for actionable visual insights
Current shift in scientific landscape toward cross-disciplinary teams, evolving cyberinfrastructure and complex data requires a new kind of data analysis and visualization tools. This talk will introduce a visualization framework developed at Cyberinfrastructure for Network Science Center (CNS) at Indiana University, founded and directed by Professor Katy Börner, Victor H. Yngve Distinguished Professor of Engineering and Information Science (http://cns.iu.edu).


1PM – 3PM: BUILDING INTERACTIVE WEB APPLICATIONS: DATA VISUALIZATION WITH SHINY
This two hour hands-on workshop will step through the process of building, visualizing, deploying, and sharing Shiny web applications. Learning this workflow will enable you to build your own interactive tools that can be used for research and teaching.

How UC Researchers use the Open Science Framework – Theresa Culley, Head of Biological Sciences and Professor of Biology, Editor-in-Chief Applications in Plant Sciences

Researcher Name: Theresa Culley, Head of Biological Sciences and Professor of Biology, Editor-in-Chief Applications in Plant Sciences

In our fourth installment of the series “How UC Researchers use the Open Science Framework”, we hear from  Theresa Culley, Head of Biological Sciences and Professor of Biology, Editor-in-Chief Applications in Plant Sciences

 

Theresa Culley - 2018 Head of Biological Sciences

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research Project Description or statement about your research interest:

My research area in Botany focuses on plant population biology and genetics and I have a deep interest in the evolution of invasive species.  I am also very interested in publication patterns regarding research involving hotspot areas of biodiversity.  My lab has been considering the question of whether researchers from developing countries, which have the most biodiversity hotspots, receive adequate credit for their work.  We are currently working on a project examining publishing bias in the scientific literature about plant conservation genetics.  This collaboration is in partnership with UC Libraries’ Digital Scholarship Center and is one of several collaborations funded by a $900,000 Andrew W. Mellon Foundation awarded to the Center.  I am also interested in this topics in my role as Editor-in-Chief for Applications in Plant Sciences.

Why did you chose to use the OSF to organize your research/projects?

I am an advocate for data sharing and reproducible research.  In an editorial I wrote for Applications in Plant Sciences, I highlighted the many reasons to ensure access to data and major considerations behind why researchers may not want to share data.  A resource like the open science framework is an excellent tool for promoting transparency and reproducibility and advancing the field at an accelerated pace.  The OSF helps to manage the entire project and especially makes it easy to share data within our research group and with collaborators.  This is a great place to manage the active parts of a project, and link all the different tools that members of a research group use .  We also have the ability to archive data and content here and look forward to a possible integration into our Institutional Repository in the future.

What about the OSF makes this tool a good choice for your project management (i.e. specific function of the OSF)?

Some of my team members prefer to use Dropbox and some are using Box.  Using the OSF makes it possible to bring all the different tools we are using under one project umbrella.  And it helps us to track activity on the project.

Additional comment for the post that you are willing to share:

Currently our project is not public, but we hope to share components in the future.

The Center for Open Science has been a great resource for our lab and the journal Applications in Plant Sciences.  In August 2016, the journal adopted the TOP guidelines, along with its sister journal, American Journal of Botany.

Science Gateways’ presentation & lunch with Dr. Sandra Gesing Oct 30th

Please join the Data and Computational Science Series (DCSS) team for a (free!) ‘Understanding Science Gateways’ presentation & lunch with Dr. Sandra Gesing, Computational Scientist, University of Notre Dame.

Science Gateways and the Science Gateways Community Institute (SGCI) with Dr. Sandra Gesing

Tuesday October 30 – TUC 400B FREE REGISTRATION

 

 

 

 

 

Science Gateways – also called virtual research environments or virtual labs – allow science and engineering communities to access shared data, software, computing services, instruments and other resources specific to their disciplines and use them also in teaching environments. The U.S. Science Gateways Community Institute (SGCI) provides free resources, services, experts, and ideas for creating and sustaining science gateways.

11am-1pm: General Introduction to Science Gateways & the Science Gateways Community Institute (SGCI) – Lunch provided

1pm-3pm: Science Gateways Presentation On Usability With Hands-On Portion – please bring a laptop

These events are free and open to all.

FREE REGISTRATION

Flyer – DCS2 _Intro to Science Gateways_30oct18

Flyer – DCS2 _Science Gateways Usability presentation_30oct18

General Introduction to Science Gateways & the Science Gateways Community Institute (SGCI)
In the last decade mature complete science gateway frameworks have evolved such as HUBzero, Galaxy, Agave and Apache Airavata. Successful implementations have been adapted for several science gateways, for example, the technologies behind the science gateways CIPRES, which is used by over 25.000 users to date and serves the community in the area of large phylogenetic trees. Lessons learned from the last decade include that approaches should be technology agnostic, use standard web technologies or deliver a complete solution. Independent of the technology, the major driver for science gateways are the user communities and user engagement is key for successful science gateways. The US Science Gateways Community Institute (SGCI), opened in August 2016, provides free resources, services, experts, and ideas for creating and sustaining science gateways. It offers five areas of services to the science gateway developer and user communities: the Incubator, Extended Developer Support, the Scientific Software Collaborative, Community Engagement and Exchange, and Workforce Development. The talk will give an introduction to science gateways, examples for science gateways & an overview on the services offered by the SGCI to serve user communities & developers for creating successful science gateways.

Discover UCIT Research Computing Tools and Services

 

 

 

 

Jetstream Hands-on Workshop October 31st

Indiana University’s Jeremy Fischer will present a hands-on workshop on Jetstream, a free, cloud-based, on-demand high performance computing resource.
Please join IT@UC R&D and UCL on October 31 from 9:30am to 12:30pm in Langsam Library room 475 for a free workshop on Jetstream, the National Science Foundation’s first science and engineering cloud. With a focus on ease of use and broad accessibility, Jetstream is designed for those who have not previously used high performance computing and software resources.

Jetstream Core capabilities

  • Interactive virtual machines (VMs) – both a public library of preconfigured VMs and a private library with saved, personalized versions
  • Secure data movement using Globus Transfer
  • Virtual desktops for access from a tablet or laptop over a cellular network
  • Reproducible data analysis using digital object identifiers (DOIs) stored and published via IU’s digital archive

Workshops are open to anyone who interested in learning about Jetstream resources. There are no prerequisites for attending. Please bring a lap top.   REGISTER

Flyer: jetstream_oct_31

For additional information, contact Jane Combs at combsje@uc.edu.

After the workshop head to the Catskeller for the first Data Science Social from 4-6 pm.  Food provided through the Provost funded Data & Computational Science Series.  Drinks on you!